Sea Lane Biotechnologies

Dixon Lane-Meadow Creek, CA, United States

Sea Lane Biotechnologies

Dixon Lane-Meadow Creek, CA, United States
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Kashyap A.K.,Sea Lane Biotechnologies | Steel J.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Rubrum A.,St Jude Research Hospital | Estelles A.,Sea Lane Biotechnologies | And 12 more authors.
PLoS Pathogens | Year: 2010

Influenza viruses elude immune responses and antiviral chemotherapeutics through genetic drift and reassortment. As a result, the development of new strategies that attack a highly conserved viral function to prevent and/or treat influenza infection is being pursued. Such novel broadly acting antiviral therapies would be less susceptible to virus escape and provide a long lasting solution to the evolving virus challenge. Here we report the in vitro and in vivo activity of a human monoclonal antibody (A06) against two isolates of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus. This antibody, which was obtained from a combinatorial library derived from a survivor of highly pathogenic H5N1 infection, neutralizes H5N1, seasonal H1N1 and 2009 "Swine" H1N1 pandemic influenza in vitro with similar potency and is capable of preventing and treating 2009 H1N1 influenza infection in murine models of disease. These results demonstrate broad activity of the A06 antibody and its utility as an anti-influenza treatment option, even against newly evolved influenza strains to which there is limited immunity in the general population. © 2010 Kashyap et al.


PubMed | Sea Lane Biotechnologies and University of New Mexico
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Science signaling | Year: 2016

The pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) is an immature form of the BCR critical for early B lymphocyte development. It is composed of the membrane-bound immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain, surrogate light chain components, and the signaling subunits Ig and Ig. We developed monovalent quantum dot (QD)-labeled probes specific for Ig to study the behavior of pre-BCRs engaged in autonomous, ligand-independent signaling in live B cells. Single-particle tracking revealed that QD-labeled pre-BCRs engaged in transient, but frequent, homotypic interactions. Receptor motion was correlated at short separation distances, consistent with the formation of dimers and higher-order oligomers. Repeated encounters between diffusing pre-BCRs appeared to reflect transient co-confinement in plasma membrane domains. In human B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) cells, we showed that frequent, short-lived, homotypic pre-BCR interactions stimulated survival signals, including expression of BCL6, which encodes a transcriptional repressor. These survival signals were blocked by inhibitory monovalent antigen-binding antibody fragments (Fabs) specific for the surrogate light chain components of the pre-BCR or by inhibitors of the tyrosine kinases Lyn and Syk. For comparison, we evaluated pre-BCR aggregation mediated by dimeric galectin-1, which has binding sites for carbohydrate and for the surrogate light chain 5 component. Galectin-1 binding resulted in the formation of large, highly immobile pre-BCR aggregates, which was partially relieved by the addition of lactose to prevent the cross-linking of galectin-BCR complexes to other glycosylated membrane components. Analysis of the pre-BCR and its signaling partners suggested that they could be potential targets for combination therapy in BCP-ALL.


Milutinovic S.,Sanford Burnham Institute for Medical Research | Kashyap A.K.,Sea Lane Biotechnologies | Yanagi T.,Hokkaido University | Wimer C.,Sanford Burnham Institute for Medical Research | And 17 more authors.
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics | Year: 2016

Death receptors of the TNF family are found on the surface of most cancer cells and their activation typically kills cancer cells through the stimulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. The endogenous ligand for death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5) is TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, TRAIL (Apo2L). As most untransformed cells are not susceptible to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, death receptor activators have emerged as promising cancer therapeutic agents. One strategy to stimulate death receptors in cancer patients is to use soluble human recombinant TRAIL protein, but this agent has limitations of a short half-life and decoy receptor sequestration. Another strategy that attempted to evade decoy receptor sequestration and to provide improved pharmacokinetic properties was to generate DR4 or DR5 agonist antibodies. The resulting monoclonal agonist antibodies overcame the limitations of short half-life and avoided decoy receptor sequestration, but are limited by activating only one of the two death receptors. Here, we describe a DR4 and DR5 dual agonist produced using Surrobody technology that activates both DR4 and DR5 to induce apoptotic death of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and also avoids decoy receptor sequestration. This fully human anti-DR4/DR5 Surrobody displays superior potency to DR4- and DR5-specific antibodies, even when combined with TRAIL-sensitizing proapoptotic agents. Moreover, cancer cells were less likely to acquire resistance to Surrobody than either anti-DR4 or anti-DR5 monospecific antibodies. Taken together, Surrobody shows promising preclinical proapoptotic activity against cancer cells, meriting further exploration of its potential as a novel cancer therapeutic agent. © 2015 American Association for Cancer Research.


PubMed | Oxford BioTherapeutics, Sutro Biopharma, Biometrica, Novartis and 4 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecular cancer therapeutics | Year: 2016

Death receptors of the TNF family are found on the surface of most cancer cells and their activation typically kills cancer cells through the stimulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. The endogenous ligand for death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5) is TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, TRAIL (Apo2L). As most untransformed cells are not susceptible to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, death receptor activators have emerged as promising cancer therapeutic agents. One strategy to stimulate death receptors in cancer patients is to use soluble human recombinant TRAIL protein, but this agent has limitations of a short half-life and decoy receptor sequestration. Another strategy that attempted to evade decoy receptor sequestration and to provide improved pharmacokinetic properties was to generate DR4 or DR5 agonist antibodies. The resulting monoclonal agonist antibodies overcame the limitations of short half-life and avoided decoy receptor sequestration, but are limited by activating only one of the two death receptors. Here, we describe a DR4 and DR5 dual agonist produced using Surrobody technology that activates both DR4 and DR5 to induce apoptotic death of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and also avoids decoy receptor sequestration. This fully human anti-DR4/DR5 Surrobody displays superior potency to DR4- and DR5-specific antibodies, even when combined with TRAIL-sensitizing proapoptotic agents. Moreover, cancer cells were less likely to acquire resistance to Surrobody than either anti-DR4 or anti-DR5 monospecific antibodies. Taken together, Surrobody shows promising preclinical proapoptotic activity against cancer cells, meriting further exploration of its potential as a novel cancer therapeutic agent.


Foreman P.K.,Sea Lane Biotechnologies | Gore M.,Sea Lane Biotechnologies | Kobel P.A.,Sea Lane Biotechnologies | Xu L.,Sea Lane Biotechnologies | And 8 more authors.
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics | Year: 2012

ErbB3 is an important regulator of tumorigenesis and is implicated in development of resistance to several currently used oncology drugs.Wehave identified ErbB3 inhibitors based on a novel biologic scaffold termed a surrobody. Two of these inhibitors appear to work by a previously unrecognized mechanism of action. As a consequence, they not only inhibited cell proliferation and intracellular signaling driven by stimulation with the ErbB3 ligand neuregulin (NRG), but also inhibited signaling and proliferation that was driven by overexpression of ErbB2 in the absence of ligand stimulation. In addition, the surrobodies inhibited tumor growth in vivo in both ErbB2-overexpressing and nonoverexpressing cells. In ErbB2-overexpressing cells, both of the anti-ErbB3 surrobodies significantly augmented the activities of trastuzumab, lapatinib, and GDC-0941, agents that inhibit cell proliferation by different mechanisms. Moreover, althoughNRGdiminished the efficacy of these agents, when they were combined with anti-ErbB3 surrobodies the affect ofNRGwas abrogated. In this capacity, the anti-ErbB3 surrobodies were more effective than the ErbB2/ErbB3 dimerization inhibitory antibody pertuzumab. Despite the fact that these surrobodies appear to engage ErbB3 differently than previously described anti-ErbB3 antibodies, they retain all of the beneficial characteristics of this class of agents, including the ability to augment drugs that inhibit EGF receptor. These anti-ErbB3 agents, therefore, show substantial promise for development as single agents or in combination with other ErbB-directed antibodies or small molecules and may provide for a broader range of therapeutic indications than previously described anti-ErbB3 antibodies. ©2012 AACR.


Xu L.,Sea Lane Biotechnologies | Estelles A.,Sea Lane Biotechnologies | Briante R.,Sea Lane Biotechnologies | Kurtzman A.L.,Sea Lane Biotechnologies | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Molecular Biology | Year: 2010

Surrobodies22The Surrobody and Surrobodies marks are trademarks of Sea Lane Biotechnologies, LLC. are a unique type of binding protein based on the pre-B-cell receptor (pre-BCR). The pre-BCR is transiently expressed during development of the antibody repertoire. Unlike heterotetrameric canonical antibodies that are composed of identical pairs of heavy and light chains, the pre-BCR is a heterohexameric complex composed of identical pairs of heavy chains that are each paired with a two-subunit surrogate light chain (SLC). The SLC contains nonimmunoglobulin-like peptide extensions on each of the two SLC components. This arrangement provides unique opportunities for protein engineering by functional derivatization of these nonimmunoglobulin-like tails. Here we report recombinant fusions to these tails with either a fully active cytokine or with single-chain variable fragment (scFv) domains to generate Surrobodies with unique functions or Surrobodies that are bispecific with respect to targeted binding. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Sea Lane Biotechnologies
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of molecular biology | Year: 2010

Surrobodies(2) are a unique type of binding protein based on the pre-B-cell receptor (pre-BCR). The pre-BCR is transiently expressed during development of the antibody repertoire. Unlike heterotetrameric canonical antibodies that are composed of identical pairs of heavy and light chains, the pre-BCR is a heterohexameric complex composed of identical pairs of heavy chains that are each paired with a two-subunit surrogate light chain (SLC). The SLC contains nonimmunoglobulin-like peptide extensions on each of the two SLC components. This arrangement provides unique opportunities for protein engineering by functional derivatization of these nonimmunoglobulin-like tails. Here we report recombinant fusions to these tails with either a fully active cytokine or with single-chain variable fragment (scFv) domains to generate Surrobodies with unique functions or Surrobodies that are bispecific with respect to targeted binding.


PubMed | Sea Lane Biotechnologies
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecular cancer therapeutics | Year: 2012

ErbB3 is an important regulator of tumorigenesis and is implicated in development of resistance to several currently used oncology drugs. We have identified ErbB3 inhibitors based on a novel biologic scaffold termed a surrobody. Two of these inhibitors appear to work by a previously unrecognized mechanism of action. As a consequence, they not only inhibited cell proliferation and intracellular signaling driven by stimulation with the ErbB3 ligand neuregulin (NRG), but also inhibited signaling and proliferation that was driven by overexpression of ErbB2 in the absence of ligand stimulation. In addition, the surrobodies inhibited tumor growth in vivo in both ErbB2-overexpressing and nonoverexpressing cells. In ErbB2-overexpressing cells, both of the anti-ErbB3 surrobodies significantly augmented the activities of trastuzumab, lapatinib, and GDC-0941, agents that inhibit cell proliferation by different mechanisms. Moreover, although NRG diminished the efficacy of these agents, when they were combined with anti-ErbB3 surrobodies the affect of NRG was abrogated. In this capacity, the anti-ErbB3 surrobodies were more effective than the ErbB2/ErbB3 dimerization inhibitory antibody pertuzumab. Despite the fact that these surrobodies appear to engage ErbB3 differently than previously described anti-ErbB3 antibodies, they retain all of the beneficial characteristics of this class of agents, including the ability to augment drugs that inhibit EGF receptor. These anti-ErbB3 agents, therefore, show substantial promise for development as single agents or in combination with other ErbB-directed antibodies or small molecules and may provide for a broader range of therapeutic indications than previously described anti-ErbB3 antibodies.


PubMed | Sea Lane Biotechnologies
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PLoS pathogens | Year: 2010

Influenza viruses elude immune responses and antiviral chemotherapeutics through genetic drift and reassortment. As a result, the development of new strategies that attack a highly conserved viral function to prevent and/or treat influenza infection is being pursued. Such novel broadly acting antiviral therapies would be less susceptible to virus escape and provide a long lasting solution to the evolving virus challenge. Here we report the in vitro and in vivo activity of a human monoclonal antibody (A06) against two isolates of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus. This antibody, which was obtained from a combinatorial library derived from a survivor of highly pathogenic H5N1 infection, neutralizes H5N1, seasonal H1N1 and 2009 Swine H1N1 pandemic influenza in vitro with similar potency and is capable of preventing and treating 2009 H1N1 influenza infection in murine models of disease. These results demonstrate broad activity of the A06 antibody and its utility as an anti-influenza treatment option, even against newly evolved influenza strains to which there is limited immunity in the general population.

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