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News Article | April 3, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Studies have established that climate fluctuations impact plant and animal life adversely. However, a new study suggests that global warming could possibly be boosting life in the Arctic waters. A study conducted by researchers at University of Southern Denmark, or SDU, states that the warm weather prevailing in the Arctic Polar ice caps is boosting the life in many of Arctic's "melt ponds." While some species all over the world are under strain due to global warming, Arctic wildlife is reportedly flourishing due to the rise in temperature. The thinning of ice in the Arctic is finally allowing more sunlight to reach the subsurface of the water, boosting algae bloom in the otherwise inhospitable region of the North Pole. "The melt ponds can form their own little ecosystem. When all the sea ice melts during the summer, algae and other organisms from melt ponds are released into the surrounding seawater," explained Heidi Louise Sørensen, lead author of this study. "Some of this food is immediately ingested by creatures living high up in the water column. Other food sinks to the bottom and gets eaten by seabed dwellers." SDU's Ronnie Glud and Bo Thamdrup, as well as Aarhus University's Søren Rysgaard and Erik Jeppesen helped Sørensen conduct the study. The researchers noted that the growth of sub-ice phytoplankton can now provide more food to an array of marine creatures, which dwell in the hostile area of North Pole. To come to this conclusion, researchers selected six melt ponds located in Yond-Sound in North-Eastern Greenland. Out of these six melt ponds, four were artificially created and two occurred naturally. The artificial melt ponds were categorized as the control ponds and the researchers added nitrogen and phosphorous in these ponds, using different permutations and combinations. Phosphorous and nitrogen were used as these nutrients are frequently deployed to fertilize gardens. For a span of 13 days Sørensen and her colleagues tested the melt pond waters under many different parameters, which included the chlorophyll content. Chlorophyll basically enables algae to absorb the energy from light sources. The researchers noticed that chlorophyll levels in the control ponds were 2 to 10 times higher than the naturally occurring melting ponds, and triggered a high rate of algae bloom. The researchers state that the algae bloom will help the life in the region, in all food chains. The copepods and krill, which are on the upper part of the water column, will survive on these nutrient-rich bacteria and algae in the melt ponds. These krill are then consumed by an array of larger animals, from amphipods to fish to whales and seals. Moreover, animals and plants such as brittle stars and sea cucumbers, which dwell on the sea bed, will also benefit from the growth of the algae. The study has been published in journal Polar Biology on March 1. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: worldmaritimenews.com

Terminal operator APM Terminals Gothenburg has decided to implement a partial lockout at the container terminal in response to the planned industrial action by members of the Swedish Dockworkers Union (SDU). As disclosed, the lockout will commence on May 19 and continue until June 30. During this period, the lockout will occur on weekdays between 16:00 and 7:00. The measure is intended to protect operations at the terminal from the most recent threats of industrial action against the company by the SDU, the terminal operator said. Consequently, port employees working the evening shift will be excluded from the workplace from 16:00 and not receive any salaries for their work, the union informed. “We have done everything in the last year to solve the conflict with the Swedish Dockworkers’ Union…The steady deterioration in the situation cannot go on, and in order to protect the business APM Terminals Gothenburg is taking protective action against the latest series of planned industrial action,” Henrik Kristensen, CEO of APM Terminals Gothenburg, commented. During the past six months, APM Terminals Gothenburg has allegedly seen productivity decline by approximately 20 percent of normal weekly capacity. This is equivalent to around 2,000 containers every week. “We see no alternative solution to this dispute other than a withdraw of current industrial actions and entering a long-term agreement including a period of time without any industrial actions. We also need an amendment to the legislation in such way that an employer who has a collective bargaining agreement (CBA) cannot be subjected to blockades or other industrial action by a trade union, who does not hold a CBA,” Kristensen added. As explained by the APM Terminals, last week SDU cancelled their planned strikes and overtime blockade to sit down in a meeting with APM Terminals together with Jordi Aragunde president of IDC. However, the meeting did not result in any kind of agreement as SDU and IDC came to the meeting demanding that a new agreement be signed on the spot, while the terminal company saw the meeting as “a first step towards a negotiation together with the National Swedish Mediation Institute.” “We need to be able to focus on recovering our business and developing our services instead of cutting staff, which is the unfortunate consequence of the disturbances in our service that the conflict results in,” the company management said in a customer advisory. “The way forward is via dialogue, where the outcome of the discussions must follow the Swedish model and arbitrary law, and ensuring that such negotiations are made via the National Swedish Mediation Institute. Only then can we ensure that the agreement will not be discarded by Labor Arbitration Court and resulting in fines and that the agreement is annulled. An agreement outside the Swedish arbitrary law would only be a short-term solution and lead to further conflicts in the future,” the advisory further reads. Separately, the SDU said it understands that APM Terminals has the legal right to lock out their employees “but expects management to take responsibility for their own actions”. Furthermore, the SDU said it is open to all kinds of collective solutions at the terminal and rejects APM Terminals’ claim that the union refuses to sign the CBA. The conflict, caused by a change in APM Terminals’ personnel policies, has been ongoing since spring 2016. Last month, the terminal operator started with layoffs and the implementation of new work patterns. The measures have been reportedly implemented without discussion with the SDU.


Pacaci S.,SDU
International Journal of Engineering Education | Year: 2012

DC-DC converters have a wide usage as the driver circuit of direct current (DC) motors. This has necessitated sensitive speed controls to be made on DC motors. Classical controllers have lower performance due to the non-linear features of DCmotors, such as saturation and friction. The Neural Network Controllers (NNC) are widely used in controlling poorlydefined nonlinear and uncertain systems. NNCcourses are now being offered by several universities at the bachelor0s and master's degree levels as a result of NNC's successful applications in these fields. However, the training of an NNC driver circuit in a laboratory environment is a time-consuming and expensive task. In this study, an NNC training set of the DC converter-fed Permanent Magnet Direct Current (PMDC) motor, which is part of the electrical machinery courses, was prepared. The set has a flexible structure and a graphical interface. Thanks to this set, it has become possible to change the PMDC motor and controller parameters, and monitor the system's reaction under various operational conditions in graphics. This training set can also guarantee effective learning and comprehension of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). © 2012 TEMPUS Publications.


Pacaci S.,SDU
International Journal of Physical Sciences | Year: 2010

Direct current (DC) motors have currently a wide usage in industrial applications. This resulted in the necessity of making the speed controls of DC motors in a sensitive manner. Conventional controllers have poorer performances due to the non-linear features of DC motors like saturation and friction. Fuzzy logic controllers (FLC) are widely used in controlling poorly-defined, nonlinear and imprecise systems. FLC courses are being given in many universities at the graduate and/or postgraduate levels due to FLC achievements in these areas. The education of a FLC driver in a lab environment is a timeconsuming and expensive task. In this study, a virtual lab is prepared for the FLC of a permanent magnet direct current (PMDC) motor, which is a part of the electrical machines course. It is a software having a flexible structure and a graphical user interface (GUI). The virtual lab allows as a software tool monitoring the system's reaction in different operation conditions through graphs by changing the PMDC motor and controller parameters. ©2010 Academic Journals.


News Article | December 5, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Large areas of the global ocean, so called marine "dead zones" contain no oxygen and support microbial processes that remove vast amounts of nitrogen from the global ocean. Nitrogen is a key nutrient for life. These dead zones are well known off the western coasts of North and South America, off the coast of Namibia and off the west coast of India in the Arabian Sea. New research published in the journal Nature Geoscience shows that the Bay of Bengal, located in the northeastern Indian Ocean, also hosts a "dead zone" of an estimated 60,000 km2 and occupying water depths of between 100 and 400 meters. This research was conducted as cooperation between the University of Southern Denmark (SDU), the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Marine Microbiology in Bremen and the National Institute of Oceanography (NIO) of India. Lead author of the study Laura Bristow, a former postdoc at SDU and now a scientist at the MPI explains "the Bay of Bengal has long stood as an enigma because standard techniques suggest no oxygen in the waters, but, despite this, there has been no indication of nitrogen loss as in other 'dead zones' of the global ocean". Using newly developed oxygen-sensing technology, the researchers demonstrated that some oxygen does exist in the Bay of Bengal waters, but at concentrations much less than standard techniques could detect and some 10,000 times less than found in the air-saturated surface waters. The researchers also discovered that the Bay of Bengal hosts microbial communities that can remove nitrogen, as in other well-known "dead zones" and even some evidence that they do remove nitrogen, but at really slow rates. Bristow continues "we have this crazy situation in the Bay of Bengal where the microbes are poised and ready to remove lots more nitrogen than they do, but the trace amounts of oxygen keep them from doing so". Wajih Naqvi, former director of NIO, and a co-author of the study, adds "remove the last amounts of oxygen, and the Bay of Bengal could become a major global player in nitrogen removal from the oceans". Removing more nitrogen from the oceans could affect the marine nitrogen balance and rates of marine productivity. Globally, warming of the atmosphere through climate change is predicted to lead to an expansion of "dead zones" in the global ocean. It is currently unclear whether climate change would lead to the removal of these last traces of oxygen from the Bay of Bengal waters. However, the Bay of Bengal is also surrounded by a heavy population density, and expected increases in fertilizer input to the Bay may increase its productivity, contributing to oxygen depletion at depth. Bristow warns "Time will tell, but the Bay of Bengal is at a "tipping point", and we currently need models to illuminate how human activities will impact the nitrogen cycle in the Bay of Bengal, and also globally".


In this study, boronizing and/or shot peening surface treatments were applied individually or in combination to the P/M steel specimens. The composition of specimens was 3% Cu. +. 0.2% C. +. balance Fe%. Tensile strength, hardness values and surface properties of treated specimens were determined. Boronizing. +. shot peening surface treatment was found to be the most convenient surface treatment for P/M steel materials based on test results. However, it is important to avoid high peening intensities for shot peening of boronized surfaces because shot peening deteriorates the boronized surface of P/M steel specimens. As a result, surface hardness values such as 1800-2500 HV were achieved after boronizing, the difference between the matrix materials with a hardness of 200 HV was quite high. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.technologyreview.com

The aircraft was on a scheduled flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing when it disappeared from air traffic controllers’ radar screens. Military radar continued to track the aircraft, which deviated from its planned route and eventually flew south, finally traveling beyond radar range. The aircraft was never seen or heard from again and the 242 people on board are assumed dead. The aircraft has never been found because nobody knows where it landed or crashed. The best guess is that it flew south for seven hours and then ditched in the Indian Ocean, some 1,800 kilometers southwest of Perth, Australia. But an extensive search of the sea surface and seafloor in that area has found nothing. All that raises an important question: have the authorities been looking in the right place? Today, Ian Holland of the Australian Defence Science and Technology Group publishes some of the reasoning that has defined the search area. Holland has been an important member of the team that has analyzed the data relating to the flight. In particular, he has focused on the last known signals sent from the aircraft to an orbiting Inmarsat communications satellite. In the absence of any other information from the plane, investigators have used these signals to determine the search area—but is there any more that can be gleaned from this data? First some background. MH370 was fitted with a satellite data unit capable of relaying voice conversations and routine data transmissions. It sent its information via an Inmarsat satellite that is geostationary over the Indian Ocean. Although the aircraft transmitted no voice communication, the satellite data unit continued to operate, acknowledging two telephone calls from the ground that went unanswered and making several routine broadcasts such as electronic handshakes and the like. At first glance, it’s hard to imagine how these brief data transmissions can provide any information about the aircraft’s location. But Holland and his colleagues have used them to gather a remarkable amount of information. The communications protocol requires a ground station to make contact with the aircraft’s satellite data unit at a specific time and frequency, regardless of where the plane is on the planet. However, the signal takes time to travel from the ground to the aircraft and back again. This time, known as the burst time offset, is determined by the distance the signal has to travel. This distance is straightforward to calculate. It defines a circle centered on the position on the ground directly below the satellite. However, the calculation does not suggest where on this circle the plane might be, and investigators have had to use other clues to narrow down this position. In total, MH370 sent seven signals from its satellite data unit, each defining a slightly different circle. It sent its final signal at 0019 UTC on March 8, 2014, having initiated a log on request just eight seconds earlier. That’s an important clue. Log on requests only occur when the satellite data unit restarts after some kind of shutdown. Investigators have assumed this shutdown occurred when the plane ran out of fuel and the SDU restarted using power from a device called a ram air turbine, which is deployed in an emergency to generate power. If that is correct, the last transmission must have been near the end of the flight. But how near? Could MH370 have glided many tens or hundreds of kilometers before it hit the ocean? If so, this significantly increases the potential search area. Holland says he and colleagues are able to narrow down this area using another line of mathematical investigation. The satellite data unit broadcasts at a specific frequency, but the aircraft’s velocity toward or away from the satellite introduces a Doppler shift that changes this frequency. This is known as the burst frequency offset. So in theory it’s possible that this shift in frequency can indicate the direction of flight at that instant. In practice, this calculation is hard to do and is much tougher than calculating the distance. Holland’s paper today is largely about this calculation. “The Burst Frequency Offset is a more complex measurement which is generally less well understood,” he says. The calculation is tough because of the number of variables that can influence the frequency. The aircraft’s motion is just one of them. The motion of the satellite plays a role, creating a Doppler shift associated with the uplink and downlink between the satellite and ground station. The ground station also attempts to compensate for any Doppler shift by changing the frequency. And the oscillators in the satellite and aircraft transmitters are not perfect. They vary, producing changes in broadcast frequency. Holland and co attempted to understand all these sources of frequency change by analyzing the broadcasts from MH370 during 20 previous flights in the week before it was lost. Holland goes on to show that if the plane was flying level when a call was made to the plane from the ground soon after contact was lost, then the burst frequency offsets suggest it must have been flying south. That’s important. He also shows that Doppler shifts on the final two broadcasts from the plane’s satellite data unit, suggest that it was descending rapidly. “The downwards acceleration over the 8 second interval between these two messages was found to be approximately 0.68g,” says Holland. This is consistent with the plane being out of control and out of fuel. That has important implications for the search area. If the plane was in an uncontrolled descent, it cannot have flown far after the last broadcast of the satellite data unit. And that means the plane must lie somewhere near the arc calculated from the burst timing offset data. “This suggests that 9M-MRO should lie relatively close to the 7th BTO arc,” concludes Holland. But exactly where on this arc isn’t clear. That’s interesting work which Holland is now opening up to outside scrutiny. He clearly sets out many of the assumptions he and his colleagues have had to make in coming to their conclusion. An important question for the community is whether these assumptions are all justified and whether Holland and his team have overlooked anything. In the meantime, the families of the victims are conducting their own search for wreckage associated with the plane. And until new evidence emerges, the search for MH370 will remain suspended. Ref: arxiv.org/abs/1702.02432: The Use of Burst Frequency Offsets in the Search for MH370


Kilincarslan S.,SDU
Acta Physica Polonica A | Year: 2015

For the adequate shielding of the radiological equipment using X and gamma rays, special materials with high attenuation properties are needed. This objective may be achieved by the use of concrete. Concrete engineers and technologists must take the role of aggregates more seriously, since there are increasing demands of modern concrete mixtures in terms of technological properties and greater economy. Heavyweight concrete contains aggregates that are natural or synthetic. In this study, metal industry waste products such as iron filings and rebar pieces were used to produce heavy concrete. Physical, mechanical and radiation shielding properties of the obtained concrete with barite, aggregates and artificial aggregates were studied. According to test results, the concrete produced with artificial aggregates can provide the desired physical properties. Radiation shielding coefficient was found to be proportional to the density of concrete.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

All mammals can hear -- but it is not an ability that is fully developed at birth. Some mammals like humans take years to fully develop their hearing abilities, but for a newborn harbour porpoise it takes less than 30 hours. This is the fastest in any studied mammal. It takes less than 30 hours for a newborn harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) to develop full hearing abilities. This is faster than any other mammals studied. Together with colleagues Lara Delgado-García from SDU and Jakob Højer Kristensen from the research and experience center Fjord&Bælt in Kerteminde, Denmark, he has published a study in Journal of Comparative Physiology A. Mammals are not born with fully developed hearing. It may take weeks, months or years, and land living mammals need the most time. Guinea pigs need weeks. Cats, rabbits, minks, bats and rats need months. And humans may need years. The biologists studied the hearing in two newborns (age 1-4 days old) and three adults from the Fjord&Bælt center. The adults were studied for comparison. No difference between newborns and adults The biologists non-invasively measured the auditory brainstem response in the animals, stimuli consisting of clicks centered at 130 kHz, which is the frequency band used for echolocation and communication in this species. The results indicate that hearing is fully developed within a day from birth, which suggests that harbour porpoise neonates have the earliest hearing development in any mammal studied so far. What about other whales? All other studies of mammal hearing have shown that newborns have only limited or sometimes even absent hearing. This is because hearing is not fully developed, but is still being developed after birth. Humans can hear right after birth - and also before birth -- but it takes years before the sense is fully developed (humans are generally slow developers). With the new knowledge about porpoise hearing development, the researchers expect that the same phenomenon might be found in other toothed whales. There are ca. 80 different toothed whale species. Information about hearing in porpoises and other toothed whales is crucial both for understanding the sensory development of newborn toothed whales shaped by evolution, as well as for designing efficient protection mechanisms and legislations for species prone to disturbance by anthropogenic noise from windmills, ship traffic, etc.


It takes less than 30 hours for a newborn harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) to develop full hearing abilities. This is faster than any other mammals studied. "Hearing is the most important of the senses for a porpoise, both for adults and calves, so it is logical that a newborn calf spends energy on fine tuning and optimizing this sense as fast as possible," says biologist Magnus Wahlberg, University of Southern Denmark. Together with colleagues Lara Delgado-García from SDU and Jakob Højer Kristensen from the research and experience center Fjord&Bælt in Kerteminde, Denmark, he has published a study in Journal of Comparative Physiology A. Mammals are not born with fully developed hearing. It may take weeks, months or years, and land living mammals need the most time. Guinea pigs need weeks. Cats, rabbits, minks, bats and rats need months. And humans may need years. "A newborn porpoise calf needs a good hearing, so that it can maintain contact with its mother and develop echolocation skills," says Jakob Højer Kristensen. The biologists studied the hearing in two newborns (age 1-4 days old) and three adults from the Fjord&Bælt center. The adults were studied for comparison. No difference between newborns and adults The biologists non-invasively measured the auditory brainstem response in the animals, stimuli consisting of clicks centered at 130 kHz, which is the frequency band used for echolocation and communication in this species. "We saw no significant differences in the hearing of the newborn and the adult porpoises, says Lara Delgado-Garcia." The results indicate that hearing is fully developed within a day from birth, which suggests that harbour porpoise neonates have the earliest hearing development in any mammal studied so far. What about other whales? All other studies of mammal hearing have shown that newborns have only limited or sometimes even absent hearing. This is because hearing is not fully developed, but is still being developed after birth. Humans can hear right after birth - and also before birth—but it takes years before the sense is fully developed (humans are generally slow developers). With the new knowledge about porpoise hearing development, the researchers expect that the same phenomenon might be found in other toothed whales. There are ca. 80 different toothed whale species. Information about hearing in porpoises and other toothed whales is crucial both for understanding the sensory development of newborn toothed whales shaped by evolution, as well as for designing efficient protection mechanisms and legislations for species prone to disturbance by anthropogenic noise from windmills, ship traffic, etc. Explore further: Early baleen whales contended for title of ocean's Barry White

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