Scripps Clinic Scripps Green Hospital

La Jolla, CA, United States

Scripps Clinic Scripps Green Hospital

La Jolla, CA, United States
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Bitar A.Y.,Scripps Clinic Scripps Green Hospital | Thompson C.D.,Scripps Clinic Scripps Green Hospital | Tan C.W.,Scripps Clinic Scripps Green Hospital | Allem K.,Scripps Clinic Scripps Green Hospital | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Cardiology Cases | Year: 2015

A 68-year-old woman presented to our hospital with unstable angina and was admitted for further evaluation. While hospitalized, she developed persistent angina with hypotension along with ST-segment elevation in leads V1-V2 along with lead aVR elevation on 12-lead electrocardiogram. Coronary angiography revealed diffuse multi-vessel coronary vasospasm most notably in the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Due to incomplete resolution of vasospasm with intracoronary verapamil and nitroglycerin, along with hemodynamic compromise requiring an intra-aortic balloon pump, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of the LAD was performed. Clinical workup revealed hypereosinophlia and elevated IgE; diagnosis of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis was confirmed with evidence of radiographic migratory pulmonary infiltrates and airway obstruction on spirometry. The patient had recurrent angina after PCI but her symptoms resolved fully after a course of corticosteroids. We attribute her refractory vasospastic angina to previously undiagnosed small/medium-vessel vasculitis.<. Learning objective: We present a case of refractory coronary artery vasospasm in the setting of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA). Typically, calcium channel blockers and nitrates are used to treat hyperreactive narrowing of the coronary vasculature but we propose this case was refractory to standard treatment due to the underlying pathology of EGPA. Alternative causes of coronary vasospasm when standard therapies fail should be considered.>. © 2015 Japanese College of Cardiology.


Raji K.O.,Scripps Clinic Scripps Green Hospital | Payne L.,Howard University | Chen S.C.,Atlanta VAMC | Chen S.C.,Emory University
Journal of Skin Cancer | Year: 2015

The goal of our study was to determine current melanoma reporting methods available to dermatologists and dermatopathologists and quantify changes in reporting methods from 2012 to 2014. A cross-sectional study design was utilized consisting of website perusal of reporting procedures, followed up by telephone and email inquiry of reporting methods from every state cancer registry. This study was conducted over a six-month period from February to August 2014. A previous similar survey was conducted in 2012 over the same time frame and results were compared. Kansas state cancer registry provided no data. As of August 2014, 96% of 49 state cancer registries had electronic methods available to all designated reporters. Seven (14%) states required an electronic-only method of reporting melanoma cases. Eighty-six percent allowed hard copy pathology report submission. Compared to the 2012 survey, 2 additional states were found to have initiated electronic reporting methods by 2014. In conclusion, a variety of methods exist for reporting diagnosed melanoma cases. Although most state cancer registries were equipped for electronic transmission of cases for mandated reporters, a number of states were ill-equipped for electronic submission from outpatient dermatologists. There was a general trend towards electronic versus nonelectronic reporting from 2012 to 2014. © 2015 Kehinde O. Raji et al.


PubMed | Scripps Clinic Scripps Green Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Dermatology online journal | Year: 2016

Transient lingual papillitis is a benign condition characterized by the inflammation of one or more fungiform papillae on the dorsolateral tongue. Although it is a common condition that affects more than half of the population, few cases have been reported in the dermatological literature. Therefore, it is a condition uncommonly recognized by dermatologists though it has a distinct clinical presentation that may be easily diagnosed by clinicians familiar with the entity. We report an interesting case of transient lingual papillitis in a 27 year-old healthy woman following the consumption of the hard candy, Atomic Fireball. We describe treatment and resolution of the condition, and its recurrence following re-exposure to the identified culprit. This report further reviews the literature to illustrate the clinical manifestations, etiology, differential diagnosis, course, and treatment of this condition.


PubMed | Scripps Research Institute and Scripps Clinic Scripps Green Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: World journal of respirology | Year: 2016

Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is an effective palliative intervention that is widely accepted for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Post-TACE pulmonary complications resulting in acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are rare events. Pulmonary complications after TACE are thought to be related to chemical injury subsequent to the migration of the infused ethiodized oil or chemotherapeutic agent to the lung vasculature, facilitated by arteriovenous (AV) shunts within the hyper-vascular HCC. We review herein the literature on pulmonary complications related to TACE for HCC. Post-TACE pulmonary complications have included pulmonary oil embolism, interstitial pneumonitis, chemical pneumonitis, ALI, ARDS, lipoid pneumonia, acute eosinophilic and neutrophilic pneumonia, bilious pleuritis, pulmonary abscess, pulmonary tumor embolism, and possibly pulmonary metastasis with HCC. The risk factors associated with post-TACE pulmonary complications identified in the literature include large hyper-vascular HCC with AV shunts, large-volume Lipiodol infusion, and embolization


PubMed | Scripps Clinic Scripps Green Hospital, Emory University and Howard University
Type: | Journal: Journal of skin cancer | Year: 2016

The goal of our study was to determine current melanoma reporting methods available to dermatologists and dermatopathologists and quantify changes in reporting methods from 2012 to 2014. A cross-sectional study design was utilized consisting of website perusal of reporting procedures, followed up by telephone and email inquiry of reporting methods from every state cancer registry. This study was conducted over a six-month period from February to August 2014. A previous similar survey was conducted in 2012 over the same time frame and results were compared. Kansas state cancer registry provided no data. As of August 2014, 96% of 49 state cancer registries had electronic methods available to all designated reporters. Seven (14%) states required an electronic-only method of reporting melanoma cases. Eighty-six percent allowed hard copy pathology report submission. Compared to the 2012 survey, 2 additional states were found to have initiated electronic reporting methods by 2014. In conclusion, a variety of methods exist for reporting diagnosed melanoma cases. Although most state cancer registries were equipped for electronic transmission of cases for mandated reporters, a number of states were ill-equipped for electronic submission from outpatient dermatologists. There was a general trend towards electronic versus nonelectronic reporting from 2012 to 2014.

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