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Pacora, Panama

Chaudhury M.F.,Screwworm Research Unit | Skoda S.R.,Screwworm Research Unit | Sagel A.,Screwworm Research Unit | Welch J.B.,U.S. Department of Agriculture
Journal of Medical Entomology | Year: 2010

Bovine blood inoculated with bacteria isolated from screwworm [Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) ]-infested animal wounds was tested as an attractant for oviposition for gravid screwworms. Eight species of gram-negative coliform (Enterobacteriaceae) bacteria mixed with bovine blood singly or all species combined and incubated for various times produced volatiles that attracted gravid flies in a cage bioassay in varying numbers. In 15-min duration tests, volatiles from five species of bacteria (Klebsiella oxytoca, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Providencia rettgeri, and Providencia stuartii) attracted more females than volatiles of the three species (Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter sakazakii, and Serratia liquefaciens). In 1-h duration oviposition tests, volatiles from the substrate using the same five species of bacteria attracted more females to oviposit than the other three species. Volatiles from 24-h incubation period elicited least attraction and oviposition whereas volatiles from the 48- and 72-h incubation period resulted in significantly more attraction and oviposition. Attraction and oviposition decreased significantly when the substrates were incubated for 96 h. Volatiles from substrate with all species of bacteria combined attracted a significantly higher percentage of flies to land and oviposit than those from substrates prepared with single species. It is possible that multiple active chemicals present in volatiles of the all-species substrate may act as synergists resulting in greater response than those observed with volatiles from single-species substrate. Before oviposition flies took a bloodmeal from the oviposition substrate. It is possible that the oviposition is moderated by two different factors in screwwormfirst, by using a chemical cue to land on a potential oviposition site and second, by using a bloodmeal to stimulate oviposition. © 2010 Entomological Society of America. Source


Chaudhury M.F.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Zhu J.J.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Sagel A.,Screwworm Research Unit | Chen H.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Skoda S.R.,U.S. Department of Agriculture
Journal of Medical Entomology | Year: 2014

Gravid screwworm flies, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel), are attracted to the volatiles from waste larval rearing media to deposit eggs. Studies were conducted to identify volatile chemicals from the waste larval media and determine their effectiveness to attract gravid flies to oviposit. Volatiles were collected using solid-phase microextraction method, and five active chemicals, namely, dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, phenol, p-cresol, and indole, were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In electroantennography studies, antennae of gravid screwworm flies, Cochliomyia macellaria (F.), responded positively to each of the identified compounds. A synthetic blend of these five compounds in the ratio of 335:200:57:1:12 was prepared and tested for its effectiveness to attract both C. hominivorax and C. macellaria using laboratory bioassay methods. Significantly more gravid C. macellaria were attracted to and landed on substrates treated with 10-fold diluted blends compared with those landed on substrates treated with ethanol only (as control). Only a few young females and young and old males were attracted to the substrates treated with the synthetic blend. The C. hominivorax females laid significantly more eggs on substrates treated with waste media, 10-fold diluted blend, and 100-fold diluted blend than on substrates with undiluted blend or ethanol. Similarly, C. macellaria deposited significantly more eggs on substrates treated with waste media, 10-fold diluted blend, and 100-fold diluted blend compared with substrates with undiluted blend or ethanol. C. macellaria females deposited significantly less amount of eggs than did C. hominivorax females. These results indicate that the synthetic blend of five compounds identified may serve as an oviposition attractant for C. hominivorax as well as for C. macellaria. © 2014 Entomological Society of America. Source


Chaudhury M.F.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Chen H.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Sagel A.,Screwworm Research Unit | Skoda S.R.,U.S. Department of Agriculture
Journal of Economic Entomology | Year: 2015

Spray-dried whole bovine blood, dry poultry egg, and a dry milk substitute are the constituents of the artificial diet currently used for mass rearing screwworm larvae, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Due to high cost and uncertainty of the commercial supply of spray-dried blood, research was conducted to identify alternative, locally available, inexpensive, dietary ingredients which could reduce cost of rearing and eliminate concerns of short supply. Experimental diets were prepared without blood component and with various ratios of bovine blood or blood cell product and defatted soy flour. Results indicate that spray-dried bovine blood can be replaced by a readily available and less expensive blood cell product. When the quantity of whole dried blood or blood cell component was reduced or removed completely from the diet, the larvae did not feed adequately, resulting in high mortality. Those larvae that survived produced pupae that were of unacceptable quality. When the milk product was replaced by soy flour, pupae were slightly smaller than those reared using the current diet; however, replacement of egg product with soy flour produced even smaller pupae. Longevity of adult flies that emerged from these small pupae was short and the females deposited few eggs. These results indicate that soy flour cannot replace the blood component from the diet, but can replace the milk product successfully. It is likely that some factor or a combination of factors in the blood act as feeding stimulants, without which larvae are unable to feed normally, resulting in high larval mortality. © 2015 The Authors. Source

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