Delta, Canada
Delta, Canada

Time filter

Source Type

Evenden M.L.,University of Alberta | Whitehouse C.M.,Forest Health and Adaptation | Onge A.S.,University of Alberta | Vanderark L.,Scotts Canada Ltd. | And 3 more authors.
Canadian Entomologist | Year: 2016

The pea leaf weevil, Sitona lineatus (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is an important pest of field peas, Pisum sativum Linnaeus (Fabaceae), and faba beans, Vicia faba Linnaeus (Fabaceae), that has recently become established in the Prairie Provinces of Canada. Male pea leaf weevils produce an aggregation pheromone, 4-methyl-3,5-heptanedione, in the spring when overwintered weevils migrate to fields to feed and mate. The current study tests the attractiveness of the aggregation pheromone with and without synthetic bean volatiles to pea leaf weevils in the spring and in the fall when weevils seek perennial legumes to feed and overwinter. Modified Leggett traps similar to those used in Europe did not retain weevils in this study. Aggregation pheromone-baited pitfall traps caught male and female weevils in the spring and fall. Weevils were not attracted to traps baited with three bean volatiles, (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate, (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, and linalool. Bean volatiles did enhance response to pheromone, but only in the fall. Weevils were captured in most semiochemical-baited traps in a 1:1 sex ratio, but female-biased catch in control traps might indicate greater activity of females in the trap vicinity. This study lays the groundwork for semiochemical-based monitoring to detect pea leaf weevil spread in the Prairie Provinces. © Entomological Society of Canada 2016.


Todd Kabaluk J.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Lafontaine J.P.,Scotts Canada Ltd. | Borden J.H.,Scotts Canada Ltd.
Journal of Pest Science | Year: 2015

Wireworms are a serious agricultural pest, with control efforts targeting soil-dwelling larvae almost exclusively. They appear yearly for a brief period as adult click beetles to mate and oviposit, and as adults, possess qualities that make them good candidates for an attract and kill control tactic: (i) susceptibility to certain entomopathogenic fungi; and (ii) attraction of males to female sex pheromones. To expand the range of wireworm control options, our study aimed to determine if banded applications of a new granular formulation of Agriotes obscurus L. (Coleoptera: Elateridae) pheromone would increase beetle mortality when applied with banded Metarhizium brunneum Petch (Ascomycota: Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) LRC112. Pheromone granules applied at 12.7 kg/ha (1 % wt/wt 1:1 geranyl hexanoate:geranyl octanoate) together with rice conidiated with 2 × 1014 conidia/ha of M. brunneum LRC112 reduced beetle recapture by 98.2 % compared to M. brunneum alone. A lower rate (2 × 1013 conidia/ha) of M. brunneum with pheromone granules reduced recapture by 82.6 % compared to the lower rate alone. A significantly greater number of beetles aggregated at pheromone bands to acquire lethal doses of conidia in as little as 6 h, with conidia dose remaining unchanged up to 54 h later. Conidia dose acquired by beetles corresponded to treatment and was positively related to total beetle mortality and speed of death. Attracting and killing click beetles might represent a new tactical approach to control wireworm larvae by reducing click beetle fecundity. We expect the pheromone granules to also to have utility for click beetle mating disruption. © 2015 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

Loading Scotts Canada Ltd. collaborators
Loading Scotts Canada Ltd. collaborators