Scottish Government

Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Scottish Government

Edinburgh, United Kingdom
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ZURICH, SWITZERLAND / ACCESSWIRE / May 11, 2017 / About 7 months ago, International Wastewater Systems Inc. (CSE: IWS; Frankfurt: IWI) announced that its wholly owned subsidiary SHARC Energy Systems (UK) Ltd. formed a strategic alliance with Scottish Water Horizons Ltd., the commercial subsidiary of Scottish Water, a public water utility owned 100% by the Scottish Government. Now, the starting shot for this major alliance occurred, as IWS announced that it has been awarded grant support to facilitate the installation of SHARC wastewater heat recovery systems at 5 locations across Scotland totaling £9.8 million GBP ($17.3 million CAD). In the press-release, Lynn Mueller, CEO of IWS, commented that "the contracts being awarded today by the Scottish Government provide the Company with first 5 of the 750 sites identified for conversion in Scotland, these are the culmination of over two years of hard work by the Company and its employees. This announcement is the game changer which the Company has been waiting for." This means that IWS will receive a total of £9.8 million GBP for the installation of 5 SHARC systems, which puts the price tag for a single SHARC at £1.96 million GBP ($3.5 million CAD) on average. If indeed 750 SHARC systems will be installed in Scotland, it becomes clear that this represents a £1.5 billion GBP ($2.6 billion CAD) opportunity for IWS, which company currently has a market capitalization of $24 million CAD. On top of all that, IWS will receive 20 years of renewable heat incentive payments. The full report can be accessed with the following links: Disclaimer: Please read the full disclaimer within the full research report as a PDF as fundamental risks and conflicts of interest exist.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-03a-2014 | Award Amount: 6.92M | Year: 2015

This proposal SFS-03a-2014-aligned focuses to minimize the risk of introduction/impact of emerging pests threatening EU agriculture and forestry. The targets are: 1) Xylella fastidiosa and its vectors in olive, grapevine, citrus, stone fruit, ornamentals and landscape trees of high socio-economic importance; 2) Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum and its vectors affecting a number of strategic crops such as potato, tomato and carrot; and 3) Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus (anomorph. Chalara fraxinea) and Phytophtora spp. seriously affecting broadleaf and conifer species in forest ecosystems. Targeted pests, their vectors and the host response will be explored using innovative approaches (NGS, transcriptomic). Diseases surveillance and epidemiology given by current methods will integrate improved survey protocols and remote sensing. Innovative IPM will include studies of microbiome to develop sustainable solutions in line with the EU plant health legislation. New knowledge gained with POnTE will result in an outcome-based pest prevention and management work plan to: a) implement area-wide pest risk assessments; b) prevent the entry and develop surveillance and early detection tools (diagnostic kits, lab-on-chip, new biomarkers); c) mitigate the spread and reduce the socio-economic impact; d) IPM based on disease resistance, disease-free seeds, cultural practices and physical environmentally-friendly treatments; e) support knowledge-based decision-making policies at EU level. The proposal fosters and promotes a multi-actor approach and transnational research collaborations among 25 Partners at the forefront of research in plant protection, agro-engineering and economics. It involves key industries/SMEs that develop diagnostic kits and services, agrochemical and seed companies, stakeholder groups. End-users will participate in the development of the project and immediately implement the practical solutions derived from the outcomes to solve these serious emerging diseases.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: SCC-1-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 19.56M | Year: 2016

The RUGGEDISED project will create urban spaces powered by secure, affordable and clean energy, smart electro-mobility, smart tools and services. The overall aims are: 1. Improving the quality of life of the citizens, by offering the citizens a clean, safe, attractive, inclusive and affordable living environment. 2. Reducing the environmental impacts of activities, by achieving a significant reduction of CO2 emissions, a major increase in the investment and usage of RES and an increase in the deployment of electric vehicles. 3. Creating a stimulating environment for sustainable economic development, by generating more sustainable jobs, stimulating community involvement in smart solutions and to boost start-up and existing companies to exploit the opportunities of the green digital economy and Internet of Things. To achieve the aims, a key innovation challenge in all three lighthouse cities of RUGGEDISED is to arrange successful combinations of integrated smart solutions for energy and e-mobility (enabled by ICT platforms and open data protocols) and business models with the right incentives for stakeholders to invest and participate in a smart society. Specific challenges relevant for the lighthouse cities are: - to manage peak load variation in thermal and electrical energy supply and demand; - to develop appropriate cooperation structures and business models for exchange of energy; - to develop Smart City (open) data platforms and energy management systems RUGGEDISED has derived 10 specific objectives and planned 32 smart solutions to meet the challenges. The development of solutions in the lighthouse cities is not the primary goal of the project, but a necessary means to find the right incentives and to create validated business cases to enable large scale deployment and replication of solutions. Three follower cities Brno, Parma and Gdansk have selected 27 smart follower solutions to follow the lighthouse cities and to prepare for implementation in the future


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE.2012.1.2-05 | Award Amount: 4.20M | Year: 2012

Healthy seed are key to high crop yields, underpinning European and global food security. A wide range of diseases and pests are carried by seed and as well as spreading and increasing old problems, new problems may be introduced into the European Community countries via this route. There are currently opportunities to improve seed quality control by implementing emerging novel methodologies. The TESTA project will develop a range of novel methods to underpin the control of these diseases and pests, including faster, more accurate methods to assess the mode of seed transmission, economic and practical sampling approaches for the detection of low levels in large seed lots, novel and efficient generic detection methodologies, non-destructive testing methods and improved, effective and sustainable disinfection methods. Target crop and disease/pest combinations have been identified in consultation with EPPO, ISHI-ISF and ISTA. Outcomes from the project will include a comprehensive electronic database of seed transmitted diseases and pests, validated detection methods for target species, a validation protocol for assessing the efficacy of disinfection, as well as many key scientific publications. These will provide supporting methods and sources for the EU seed testing laboratories and plant health services. The consortium comprises experienced researchers who have been involved in key previous research projects funded by the EU and national authorities, representatives of EPPO, ISTA plant health panel and ISHI working groups as well as seed testing laboratories and SMEs involved in seed production. The consortium includes a member from South Africa who is an international expert on seed production in non-EU countries and will provide insight into emerging risks. Involvement of these important players in the management of the project will guarantee that the project plans and outcomes are well-targeted and taken up in a practice so that the project legacy is ensured.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2010.1.2-06 | Award Amount: 1.30M | Year: 2011

The Community Plant Health Regime (CPHR) aims to prevent the introduction, establishment and spread of regulated and quarantine plant pests. These pests pose increasing risks to European agriculture, horticulture, forestry and the environment. This is due to increased globalisation of trade (volume and diversity), but is exacerbated by climate change and EU expansion (increased pathways). In comparison, resources for national plant health inspection services, science programmes and research are declining. For this reason, the EUPHRESCO Phytosanitary ERA-Net was established in 2006, with the full support of the EU Council Working Party of Chief Officers of Plant Health Services. It aimed to better coordinate national, trans-national and EU-funded research in direct support of the CPHR (EU policy, inspection services and science capability). The current EUPHRESCO Project ends in 2010; this new EUPHRESCO-II proposal will deepen and enlarge the previously successful cooperation between research programmes. EUPHRESCO-II will: Strengthen the basis for, and result in, a self-sustainable, long-term, durable network; Deepen the cooperation through continued trans-national research that optimises limited resources, supports other plant health initiatives and coordination mechanisms, and further develops a culture of collaboration; Deepen the cooperation by improving processes and tools and reducing barriers; Enlarging the network (31 partners, plus 14 Observers) to increase its critical mass, address more regional or sector-based (e.g. forestry plant health) issues and increase opportunities for international cooperation with non-European countries that are either the source of quarantine pests or share similar pest problems. Overall, EUPHRESCO II will enhance the European Research Area that supports the CPHR. It will directly support EU policy, operations and science capability by providing rapid and customised answers to challenges caused by quarantine plant pests.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2010.4.2.3-3 | Award Amount: 1.88M | Year: 2011

The policy issue central to this project is food as many of todays sustainability problems (e.g. water shortage, GHG emissions, pollution of soil and water, decrease of biodiversity, urban waste) are related to the prevailing pattern of food production and consumption (including processing and distribution). Hence, developing more sustainable food production and consumption patterns will have a significant impact on sustainable development in general. This project aims to develop and experiment with new integrative modalities of linking research to policy-making in the field of sustainable food consumption and production, thereby contributing to the establishment of new policy-relevant communities of researchers, policy makers & CSOs and enhancing the use of research insights in policies to promote sustainable food systems. Three different Communities of Practice will be developed, focusing on different dimensions of a newly emerging integrated territorial food geography: a) short food supply chains, b) sustainable public food procurement, and c) urban food strategies. Like the FOODLINKS consortium, each CoP will consist of researchers, policymakers and CSO representatives. In this project we will monitor and evaluate the knowledge brokerage activities in the CoPs, in order to propose new ways of linking research and policymaking in the food domain as well as in other public domains.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: EeB.ENV.2012.6.6-2 | Award Amount: 6.79M | Year: 2012

Europe can become the leader in CO2 emission reduction by applying innovative solutions to its built cultural heritage. According to the European Recovery Plan one of the actions that needs to be taken to tackle the current crisis, is investing in energy efficiency. Historic urban buildings consume 4% of all energy and are responsible for 3% of CO2 emissions. Therefore, improving energy efficiency in historic buildings and historic districts is essential. Nevertheless, most of the current developments in energy efficiency address new construction without dealing with the unique problems of historic structures. A number of technologies and products have been developed, however many of the solutions are not acceptable for historic structures due to the necessity of preserving integrity and authenticity. Therefore, the main goal of EFFESUS is to develop and demonstrate, through case studies a methodology for assessing and selecting energy efficiency interventions, based on existing and new technologies that are compatible with heritage values. A Decision Support System will be a primary deliverable. The environment in historic buildings and urban districts is controlled differently from modern cities and accordingly the project will also develop a multi-scale data model for the management of energy. In addition, new non-invasive, reversible yet cost-effective technologies for significantly improving thermal properties will also be developed. Finally, existing regulations and building policies may not fit cultural heritage specificities so the EFFESUS project will also address these non-technical barriers. These outcomes will be achieved through 10 work packages, performed by an interdisciplinary consortium of 23 partners from 13 countries. Due to the attractiveness of this niche market, 36 % of the project budget is allocated to SMEs, which will work together with large companies, research institutions and end users throughout the duration of the project.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.1.2-12 | Award Amount: 3.93M | Year: 2012

The genetic changes associated with domestication in aquaculture pose an increasing threat to the integrity of native fish gene pools. Consequently, there is a bourgeoning need for the development of molecular tools to assess and monitor the genetic impact of escaped or released farmed fish. In addition, exploration of basic links between genetic differences among farmed and wild fish and differences in important life-history traits with fitness consequences are crucial prerequisites for designing biologically informed management strategies. The project AquaTrace will establish an overview of current knowledge on aquaculture breeding, genomic resources and previous research projects for the marine species seabass, seabream and turbot. The project will apply cutting-edge genomic methods for the development of high-powered, cost-efficient, forensically validated and transferable DNA based tools for identifying and tracing the impact of farmed fish in the wild. Controlled experiments with wild and farmed fish and their hybrids will be conducted with salmon and brown trout as model organisms using advanced common garden facilities. These experiments will elucidate the fundamental consequences of introgression by pinpointing and assessing the effects on fitness of specific genomic regions. Generated insights will form the basis of a risk assessment and management recommendations including suggestions for mitigation and associated costs. This information and the developed molecular tools will be available as open-access support to project participants and external stakeholders including the aquaculture industry. The project is expected to facilitate technology transfer to the aquaculture sector by promoting better tailored breeding practices and traceability throughout production chain. Overall this initiative will support the development of sustainable European aquaculture and provide Good Environmental Status in line with the Marine Strategy Framework Directive.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2010.5.2-1 | Award Amount: 5.07M | Year: 2011

SiteChar will facilitate the implementation of CO2 storage in Europe by improving and extending standard site characterisation workflows, and by establishing the feasibility of CO2 storage on representative potential CO2 complexes suitable for development in the near term. Reasonable estimates of the theoretical capacities of storage sites have been undertaken in previous studies. We will develop a workflow to undertake site characterisation, assessment of risks and development of monitoring plans necessary to reach the final stage of licensing. We will perform detailed site-specific techno-economic analyses and evaluate injection strategies, based on credible and realistic sources of CO2. We will undertake in-depth activities to enhance public awareness. The SiteChar workflow will be tested at a range of onshore and offshore, open and structural traps and depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs, located across Europe. Site characterisation will be placed in an economic context. A key innovation will be the development of internal dry-run licence applications for 2 sites, tested by relevant regulatory authorities. This iterative process will refine the storage site characterisation workflow and identify gaps in site-specific characterisation needed to secure storage licenses under the EC Directive, as implemented in host member states. In addition, we will address critical points of the workflow, such as screening of multiple options, fault geomechanics, reactive flow simulation, the presence of geological heterogeneity, trapping mechanisms, a Framework for Risk Assessment and Management and sensitivity analysis. These studies will be conducted through a strong collaboration of experienced industrial and academic research partners. SiteChar will produce practical guidelines for site characterisation and advance a portfolio of sites to a (near-) completed feasibility stage, ready for detailed front-end engineering and design.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-03a-2014 | Award Amount: 7.00M | Year: 2015

Insects are the most diverse Class of life on earth, and different insects can be essential for, or highly damaging to, agriculture, horticulture and forestry. There is a pressing need, not just for new insecticides to combat resistance, but more specific, greener insecticides that target deleterious insects while sparing beneficial ones. This proposal aims to identify such insecticides by turning the insects own hormones against them, both by designing artificial neuropeptide mimetic analogs as candidate compounds, and by generating transgenic insects that carry deleterious neuropeptide payloads within them, that can propagate through a population and impact on survival at times of stress. We have assembled an international multi-actor consortium from EU member and associated member states, as well as a third country partner, with unparalleled experience in insect functional genomics, neuropeptide physiology, synthetic chemistry and synthetic biology, and in field-testing of candidates. Established links to agricultural, horticultural and forestry end-users, agencies/advisors and our SME partners ensure relevance to user need; and set out a pathway to exploitation and implementation of our results, for impact across three major economic sectors in the EU and globally. We will deliver novel, green neuropeptide-based insect pest biocontrol tools by: utilising beyond the State-of-the-Art technologies based on two approaches: rational design of neuropeptide hormone analogues; and development of genetically-encoded neuropeptides for translational insect synthetic biology in genetic pest management. bridging outstanding research and technology in neuroendocrinology and genetics to end user need, to ultimately produce neuropeptide hormone analogues and genetic pest management biocontrol tools. validating and demonstrating these novel insect biocontrol agents in laboratory, field and forest applications, based on user need and a market-driven approach.

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