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Dixit A.K.,Scientist Agronomy | Dixit A.K.,Indian Grassland And Fodder Research Institute | Kumar S.,Indian Grassland And Fodder Research Institute | Rai A.K.,ICAR CSSRI | And 3 more authors.
Indian Journal of Agronomy | Year: 2014

A field experiment was conducted at Jhansi during the winter season (rabi) of 2009–10 to rainy season (kharif) of 2012 to study the impact of tillage practices and irrigation management on chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and their carry-over effects on succeeding fodder sorghum [Sorghum bicolour (L.) Moench]. Reduced tillage recorded 1.74 t/ha grain yield of chickpea and was on a par with conventional tillage. However, reduced tillage (57.7%) and zero tillage (57.4%) recorded significantly higher harvest index than conventional tillage (55.2%). Similarly, application of 2 irrigations to chickpea recorded higher grain yield (1.90 t/ha) and system productivity in terms of chickpea-equivalent yield (4.00 t/ha) but application of only 1 irrigation recorded higher irrigation water-use efficiency (295 kg grain /ha-cm). Significantly higher plant height, plant population, grains per pod, 100-seed weight, weeds count and weed dry matter were also recorded in irrigated plots than unirrigated control. Higher system productivity in terms of chickpea-equivalent yield (CEY) was recorded under reduced tillage (3.85 t/ha) and conventional tillage (3.90 t/ha) than zero tillage. Reduced tillage and 2 irrigations in chickpea recorded higher net returns i.e. 33.1 × 103 and 34.6 × 103/ha and benefit: cost ratio i.e. 0.85 and 0.87, from whole system. After 3 years, the bulk density of 15–30 cm soil depths was lower in zero tillage (1.34 Mg/m3) than conventional (1.40 Mg/ m3) and reduced tillage (1.37 Mg/m3). Similarly, significantly higher values of total organic carbon (10.31 g/kg), electrical conductivity (0.20 dS/m), available N (260.1 kg/ha) and available K (197.7 kg/ha) were recorded under zero tillage. Application of 2 irrigations recorded lower electrical conductivity (0.152 dS/m) and available N (237.0 kg/ha) and higher available K (189.8 kg/ha) status. © 2014, Indian Society of Agronomy. All rights reserved.


Kumaresan M.,Scientist Agronomy | Kumaresan M.,ICAR Central Tobacco Research Institute Regional Station | Swamy A.,Scientist Plant Breeding | Swamy A.,ICAR Central Tobacco Research Institute Regional Station | And 2 more authors.
Indian Journal of Agronomy | Year: 2014

A field experiment was conducted at the farm of Central Tobacco Research Institute-Regional Station, Vedasandur, during 2008–10, to evaluate the organic and inorganic sources of nutrients in chewing tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) and their residual effect on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) under different fertility levels. Three levels of organic manures, viz. sunhemp green-manuring and ploughing in-situ at 45 days, 75% of recommended farmyard manure (FYM), 100% of FYM with 2 levels of fertilizers, viz. 75% recommended dose of fertilizer (RDF) and 100% RDF were tested in chewing tobacco. The residual effect of the organic manures and fertilizers applied to chewing tobacco was tested in the succeeding sunflower. Three levels of fertilizers, viz. 50% RDF, 75% RDF and 100% RDF, were tested for sunflower. First-grade leaf yield and total cured leaf yield of chewing tobacco increased significantly by 15% and 16%, respectively, with sunhemp green manuring over the 75% RFYM. The first grade leaf yield and total cured leaf yield recorded was 2.99 and 3.55 t/ha respectively. Recommended dose of fertilizer (RDF) at 100% level significantly increased the First-grade leaf yield (FGLY) and total cured leaf yield (TCLY) by 9 and 5%, respectively, over the 75% RDF. Sunhemp green manuring to chewing tobacco significantly increased the sunflower seed yield and oil yield by 18 and 25%, respectively, over the 75% recommended farmyard manure. The RDF at 100% level to sunflower increased the seed and oil yield by 16 and 25%, respectively, over the 75% RDF to chewing tobacco. The seed and oil yield recorded were 1.39 t/ha and 474 kg/ha. Tobacco- equivalent yield significantly increased by 16% over the 75% RFYM. The tobacco-equivalent yield (TEY) was 4.32 t/ha. Application of 100% RDF to tobacco significantly increased the net returns by 6% over the 75% RDF. The net returns recorded was 98,300/ha. The residual soil organic-C status varied between 0.48 and 0.53%. The phosphorus balance showed that the net gain of P was higher (2.0–2.2 kg/ha), when RDF was added to chewing tobacco as well as sunflower. The potassium balance showed that the net gain of K was higher (12–16 kg/ha) with 100% recommended farmyard manure under various nutrient level. © 2014, Indian Society of Agronomy. All rights reserved.

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