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News Article | August 14, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Scientist.com, the world's largest marketplace for scientific services, today announced that it has joined Global Genes as co-sponsors of the “RARE Battle of the Brains,” a biotech competition at the inaugural Global Genes RARE Partnering and Investor Forum on September 14, 2017 in Irvine, California. Rare diseases affect more than 30 million Americans, yet less than five percent of the 7,000 known rare diseases have treatments available. “Despite a significant public need, rare diseases are often overlooked," said Kevin Lustig, PhD, CEO of Scientist.com. "A science-based competition will bring much needed attention to rare diseases and provide a few early-stage companies the opportunity to take the next step in their development.” The pitch competition will feature promising early-stage science innovators vying for a prize package of cash, publicity and sponsor-provided goods and services valued at $50K+. Visit the event website for entry information, judging criteria and application. “It’s unfortunate that research progress on rare diseases is often not limited by a shortage of discoveries but by challenges faced in assembling the resources and teams to build companies that can translate those discoveries into treatments,” said Brad Margus, CEO of a recently formed venture backed biotech, founder of a non-profit focused on his sons’ disease, and a Co-Chair of the Partnering Forum. "This event will connect the players needed to accelerate promising research and development in rare disease.” The application deadline to compete in the pitch competition is August 31, 2017. An expert panel consisting of scientists, pharma industry leaders and well-known venture capitalists will select the winners. “Events like the Global Genes’ RARE Partnering and Investor Forum encourage pharmaceutical industry leaders, academic researchers, research scientists, investors and entrepreneurs to collaborate in their collective mission to advance rare disease research and drug development,” said Nicole Boice, CEO of Global Genes. “Together, we can help the millions of patients and caregivers affected by rare disease.” About Scientist.com Scientist.com is the world's largest scientific services marketplace. The marketplace simplifies research sourcing, saves time and money and provides access to innovative tools and technologies - while maintaining full compliance with an organization’s procurement policies. Scientist.com operates private marketplaces for most of the world’s major pharmaceutical companies and the US National Institutes of Health (NIH). Visit scientist.com to learn more. About Global Genes Global Genes® is a leading rare disease patient advocacy organization that serves the needs of patients and families touched by rare and genetic diseases. Since 2009, under the unifying symbol of HOPE, the Blue Denim Genes Ribbon®, Global Genes® has been building awareness, developing patient-focused education and advocacy tools, and funding patient care programs and early investigative research. For more information, visit http://www.globalgenes.org.


News Article | September 20, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Scientist.com, the world's leading marketplace for scientific services, and Global Genes, a leading global rare disease patient advocacy organization, announced that CureDuchenne won a prize package valued at $50K at the “RARE Battle of the Brains,” a scientific pitch competition held in Irvine, CA on Sept 14, 2017. CureDuchenne is a Newport Beach, CA-based company recognized as a global leader in research, patient care and innovation for improving and extending the lives of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. CureDuchenne’s Founder, Debra Miller, impressed judges with a polished presentation and heartfelt narrative on Dr. Eric Olson’s CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing research that could be transformational for Duchenne patients. Miller and her husband Paul founded CureDuchenne after their son was diagnosed with the crippling disease. From creating a one-of-a-kind Duchenne-specific physical therapy program to funding human clinical trials for new drug discovery, CureDuchenne has brought the fight to Duchenne at every level. “It is very humbling to think that we might actually play a role in finding a new treatment that would help our son and other children like him,” said Debra Miller, CureDuchenne’s founder, CEO and concerned parent. “There’s a huge unmet need for new therapies like gene editing and we need to work together and take advantage of every resource to accelerate the discovery process.” “We are thrilled to sponsor competitions like this that demonstrate that the Scientist.com marketplace can help anyone—a concerned parent, a patient, an academic researcher or an industry scientist—plan and run research experiments and develop new cures,” said Kevin Lustig, PhD, Scientist.com’s CEO. "Scientist.com was designed to democratize science.” The “RARE Battle of the Brains” pitch competition capped off the first-ever RARE Partnering and Investor Forum, which was part of the Global Genes’ 6th Annual RARE Patient Advocacy Summit, the largest event assembling rare disease patients, families and stakeholders worldwide. The competition featured eight promising early-stage innovators from biotech and academia: Myos (a subsidiary of Boston Children’s Hospital), Orphagen Pharmaceuticals, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Chameleon Biosciences, Boston’s Children Hospital, Circumvent Pharmaceuticals and eventual winner, CureDuchenne. Varying rare diseases addressed through entrants’ research included Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Batten disease, adrenocortical cancer and Hemophilia A and B, among others. Morrie Ruffin, Manager of the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine, hosted the event, and the esteemed panel of judges was comprised of 5am Ventures’ Kush Parmar, Shire’s Toby Freyman, Graeme Martin of Hatchbox Consulting and Jeremy Springhorn of Road’s End, all of whom presented at the RARE Partnering and Investor Forum. “The people in this community are all extraordinary; they’re all champions,” said Nicole Boice, CEO of Global Genes. “When we all work together, patients win, companies win and researchers win because it takes a village to cure a rare disease.” To see a full overview of the event, click here. About Scientist.com Scientist.com is the world's largest scientific services marketplace. The marketplace simplifies research sourcing, saves time and money and provides access to innovative tools and technologies - while maintaining full compliance with an organization’s procurement policies. Scientist.com operates private marketplaces for most of the world’s major pharmaceutical companies and the US National Institutes of Health (NIH). Visit scientist.com to learn more. About Global Genes Global Genes® is a leading rare disease patient advocacy organization that serves the needs of patients and families touched by rare and genetic diseases. Since 2009, under the unifying symbol of HOPE, the Blue Denim Genes Ribbon®, Global Genes® has been building awareness, developing patient-focused education and advocacy tools, and funding patient care programs and early investigative research. For more information, visit http://www.globalgenes.org. Join the RARE conversation @GlobalGenes on social media. About CureDuchenne CureDuchenne was founded in 2003 with a focus on saving the lives of those with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a disease that affects more than 300,000 boys worldwide. With support from CureDuchenne, nine research projects have advanced to human clinical trials. CureDuchenne also is the innovator bringing physical therapy and standard of care to local communities around the country through CureDuchenne Cares.  For more information, please visit CureDuchenne.org and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.


Joyce A.J.,Materials Health | Quantock K.M.,Scientist | Banh R.,Materials Health | Liew Y.W.,Red Cross
Immunohematology | Year: 2017

CONCLUSIONS: In situations when a patient's antibody detection test is negative, many institutions have moved from an indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) crossmatch to an electronic crossmatch system. Here we report a case of an acute hemolytic transfusion reaction attributable to anti-Dia in a patient with a negative antibody detection test. A 22-year-old female patient with a diagnosis of β thalassemia and sickle cell anemia commenced a routine exchange transfusion of 5 units of red blood cells (RBCs) in the apheresis unit as part of her regular treatment. When the patient started receiving the implicated unit, she reported back pain, chest pain, and a feeling of anxiety, suggestive of an acute transfusion reaction. The transfusion was ceased and an investigation of an adverse event was commenced. This case illustrates that the presence of antibodies to low-prevalence antigens remains a significant issue for transfusion-dependent individuals. To prevent other transfusion reactions by anti-Dia, the addition of Di(a+) cells to the reagent RBCs used for the antibody detection test along with IAT-crossmatching of donor units for all patients with sickle cell disease is recommended.


PubMed | Center for Community Medicine, Scientist and Laboratory Medicine
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of clinical and diagnostic research : JCDR | Year: 2016

There is a balance between the oxidative and the anti-oxidative forces in human body. Some studies document decreased level of anti-oxidant in pre-eclampsia while other studies showed normal level of anti-oxidant in pre-eclampsia and the evidence is equivocal.The aim of the present study was to assess enzymatic anti-oxidant activities in pre-eclamptic women and compare it with normotensive pregnant women with period of gestation between 28 to 36 weeks.A community-based cross-sectional survey was conducted (from November 2012-December 2013) at the Ballabgarh Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) site which was managed by Centre for Community Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. All registered pregnant women with period of gestation between 28 weeks - 36 weeks were eligible for inclusion in the study. All eligible pregnant women were contacted through home visit. A total of 217 pregnant women were enrolled out of which 209 blood samples were collected from pregnant women. About three ml of blood from antecubital vein was drawn without use of tourniquet, under aseptic conditions. It was later analysed for the serum anti-oxidative measures {Malanoaldehyde, Vitamin C, Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP) levels}. Data were entered on Epi-Info version 3.5.4. Data management and analysis was carried out in Stata 11. The means were compared using t-test and p-value stated. Categorical data was analysed using chi-square test. Logistic regression was used and adjusted p-value was stated.A total of 217 pregnant women were eligible for the study and all were enrolled. Out of the 217 blood samples collected, eight samples accidently got destroyed. A total of 28 out of remaining 209 pregnant women (13.4%) had pre-eclampsia. Mean age (SD) was 22.4 (2.3) years, mean height (SD) was 156.6 (6.9) cm, mean weight (SD) was 65.1 (9.7) kg in pre-eclampsia group. In pre-eclampsia group mean serum levels of malanoaldehyde, vitamin C and FRAP was 4.2 (0.26) ng/dl, 0.83 (0.11) mg/dl, 678.0 (35.6) mol/L. It was 4.5 (0.09) ng/dl,0.88 (0.03) mg/dl, 599.3 (13.3) mol/L in normotensive pregnant women group respectively. The difference was statistically significant for FRAP levels only.Serum anti-oxidant levels are not raised among women with pre-eclampsia.


Roy N.,Scientist | Choudhury R.N.P.,Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar
Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Electronics | Year: 2016

As the variable dielectric constant, loss and some electric characteristics over the frequency and temperature band of operation make a material unsuitable for some devices, an attempt has been made through this work to obtain frequency–temperature independence of said parameters by suitable addition of metal oxide (MnO2) in lead-free ferroelectric (BaSr) TiO3 in the band of interest. The doping concentration of the oxide in Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 has been optimized for the purpose. The doping of manganese oxide reduces the loss by compensating the oxygen vacancies and the structural defects. With variable doping concentration of MnO2 dielectric loss is brought down to an acceptable limit (<10−3). Impedance and modulus spectroscopy of the prepared materials provide an insight into the electrical processes involved in it. The AC/DC conductivity analysis provides loss-conductivity spectrum for device utilization. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.


PubMed | Scientist and Acharya Nagarjuna University
Type: | Journal: International journal of biological macromolecules | Year: 2016

In this research, a serine protease was isolated and purified from Indian earthworm Pheretima posthumous by fractionation with ammonium sulfate followed by ion exchange and size exclusion chromatography. The molecular weight of purified protease was determined 29.5kDa by Maldi-TOF/MS. The enzyme exhibited a maximum proteolytic activity of 1.2U/ml with specific activity of 17.65U/mg at pH 8 and temperature 40C. 2D electrophoresis study illustrated purity of enzyme, purified as a single peptide and isoelectric point (pI) 4.5. The enzyme has shown tremendous stability and proteolytic activity in the wide range of pH range (4-12) and temperatures (20-60C). The kinetic constant Km and Vmax of purified protease were reported 0.09mg/ml and 23.25mg/ml/min. The enzyme also possesses excellent catalytic capacity with Kcat (341.9min


Gebrekidan B.,Mekelle University | Tegegne A.,Scientist | Regassa F.,Addis Ababa Institute of Technology
Animal Reproduction Science | Year: 2016

Retrospective studies were conducted in Kafta-Humera and Wukro areas of Tigray region of Ethiopia. A retrospective study was carried out on 12 herds consisting 2144 Begait cattle from pastoral and agro-pastoral areas to assess herd composition and calf-crop. To evaluate the reproductive performance, 210 cows were selected randomly from pastoral, agro-pastoral, confinement and crop-livestock production systems. All necessary data of reproductive parameters were collected through questionnaire surveys, group discussions and follow-up observations. SPSS software was applied to analyze the data. The result of the present study showed that the average calf-crop of 53% and 42.1% and annual calf mortality rate of 20.8% and 9.4%, were observed for pastoral and agro-pastoral production systems, respectively. The mean age at first service (AFS), age at first calving (AFC) and calving interval (CI) in months were 34.9, 43.9 and 12.9 in pastoral, 35.9, 45.0 and 14.0 in agro-pastoral, 34.4, 44.9 and 15.0 in confinement and 40.5, 49.5 and 19.6 in crop-livestock production systems, respectively. AFC and CI were significantly (P < 0.05) affected by site and production system. Significantly longer AFS, AFC and CI were noticed in crop-livestock system than in the other 3 production systems. However, CI was not affected by age and parity. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Sardar S.,Scientist | Babu K.A.,Scientist
Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on VLSI Design | Year: 2014

Hardware implementation of a real-time, highly accurate face recognition system (FRS) is proposed in this correspondence. Face images are acquired from a CMOS sensor camera connected to Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)based reconfigurable hardware board using Cam Link interface. We used contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) for image contrast enhancement, discrete wavelet transform (DWT) to remove variable illumination & select appropriate sub band and principal component analysis (PCA) with 35 principal components which is optimized for performance and speed. Finally, Restricted Coulomb Energy (RCE) based neural network (NN) classifier is used for face recognition. We have implemented the RCE based NN in FPGA and thus utilized the inherent parallelism effectively which is not possible with NN software implementation. The performance of our implementation is superior than face recognition software and hardware implementations, which are targeted to achieve higher recognition accuracy at faster rate using minimum computational resources. Our system recognizes a single image in real-time i.e. within 18 ms corresponding to 37 frames per second image capture. We have verified our proposed system with multiple standard face databases as well as using our own face data repository. © 2014 IEEE.


The relationship between both interstitial and blood glucose remains a debated topic, on which there is still no consensus. The experimental evidence suggests that blood and interstitial fluid glucose levels are correlated by a kinetic equilibrium, which as a consequence has a time and magnitude gradient in glucose concentration between blood and interstitium. Furthermore, this equilibrium can be perturbed by several physiological effects (such as foreign body response, wound-healing effect, etc.), with a consequent reduction of interstitial fluid glucose versus blood glucose correlation. In the present study, the impact of operating in the interstitium on continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMs) will be discussed in depth, both for the application of CGMs in the management of diabetes and in other critical areas, such as tight glycaemic control in critically ill patients.


PubMed | Addis Ababa Institute of Technology, Scientist and Mekelle University
Type: | Journal: Animal reproduction science | Year: 2016

Retrospective studies were conducted in Kafta-Humera and Wukro areas of Tigray region of Ethiopia. A retrospective study was carried out on 12 herds consisting 2144 Begait cattle from pastoral and agro-pastoral areas to assess herd composition and calf-crop. To evaluate the reproductive performance, 210 cows were selected randomly from pastoral, agro-pastoral, confinement and crop-livestock production systems. All necessary data of reproductive parameters were collected through questionnaire surveys, group discussions and follow-up observations. SPSS software was applied to analyze the data. The result of the present study showed that the average calf-crop of 53% and 42.1% and annual calf mortality rate of 20.8% and 9.4%, were observed for pastoral and agro-pastoral production systems, respectively. The mean age at first service (AFS), age at first calving (AFC) and calving interval (CI) in months were 34.9, 43.9 and 12.9 in pastoral, 35.9, 45.0 and 14.0 in agro-pastoral, 34.4, 44.9 and 15.0 in confinement and 40.5, 49.5 and 19.6 in crop-livestock production systems, respectively. AFC and CI were significantly (P<0.05) affected by site and production system. Significantly longer AFS, AFC and CI were noticed in crop-livestock system than in the other 3 production systems. However, CI was not affected by age and parity.

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