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Feng J.,Scientific Solutions, Inc.
Acta Crystallographica Section A: Foundations of Crystallography | Year: 2012

A new Fourier cycling phasing method is proposed based on the mathematical principle of the global minimization. In reciprocal space, the Fourier coefficient is of a mixed form of the normalized structure factors (2E o 2 - E c 2)E c, while in direct space the Fourier map is modified with a peak-picking procedure. This method does not use any preliminary information and does not rely on any critical parameter; it can start with either randomly assigned phases or fixed phases (all zeros). This method performs significantly better than the commonly used forms of Fourier cycling. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography.


Feng J.,Scientific Solutions, Inc.
Journal of Applied Crystallography | Year: 2011

A method is proposed for the initial identification of non-hydrogen atomic species in a crystal from X-ray diffraction intensities when the chemical composition is not available. When atom positions are determined, a portion of the scattering factor curve for each atom can be obtained by Fourier synthesis with reflections from concentric shells. From these curves, the atomic number and the isotropic displacement parameter for all non-H atoms, and the scaling constant of the structure factors, can be approximately determined. © 2011 International Union of Crystallography Printed in Singapore - all rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.72K | Year: 2010

The problem with current electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources is they are large. This large size is often incompatible with limited space availability, low power requirements, and/or light weight. These last two requirements are particularly important for accelerator systems designed for portable or transportable operation. A small, lightweight, and reliable source of singly ionized atoms could have a revolutionary impact on accelerator systems. Others have tried various approaches to reduce the size, but the minimum size of these sources has been limited by the free-space wavelength of the rf power energizing the plasma. Scientific Solutions is developing a miniature ECR ion source that is considerably smaller and more compact than those in use today. This miniECR source concept makes judicious use of dielectric materials to shrink the size of the ion source to dimensions smaller than the free-space wavelength. This small size reduces the rf power required to energize the source and enables the miniECR source to be used portable systems and in arrays of sources that could replace the large area sources used in ion implantation. A prototype miniECR source will be fabricated in Phase I of this project. Phase II involves extensive testing and qualification of the ion beam parameters with additional prototypes being fabricated and tested for specific applications. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits Commercial applications include neutron generators, portable accelerators for radiography, detection of explosives and special nuclear materials, and any ion beam application where reliability and low maintenance are essential.


Patent
Scientific Solutions, Inc. | Date: 2014-09-05

Disclosed is an ultrasonic IRIS inspection system and a method of providing automatically compensated concentric B-scans by means of curve-fitting the unadjusted tube boundaries from inspection data, and from the curve fitted theoretical circle, using non-linear regression analysis to determine an adjusted center. The off-center distance between the adjust center and the misaligned center is then used to produce concentric inspection result by compensating the unadjusted inspection result with the off-center distance.


Patent
Scientific Solutions, Inc. | Date: 2014-04-10

Herein disclosed is an x-ray florescence (XRF) test system which comprises an XRF test instrument used for testing a test targets responses to X-rays, the instrument including a test window allowing the X-ray and its responsive energy to pass through, and at least one window protecting film allowing X-rays to pass through and providing protections to the window, the film being configured to be coupled with the window in a fashion to be removed from or applied or reapplied over the window. The corresponding calibration mode can be manually or automatically applied according to the specific film presently in use.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 80.00K | Year: 2015

Unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) threats in a harbor environment present a complex, and in certain ways contradictory, set of detection and classification issues. The threats may come in the form of highly aggressive behaviors with associated kinematics and classification signatures, as well as passive loitering with different kinematics and classification opportunities.

One obvious modality to consider is mid-to-high frequency active acoustics in the 30-120 kHz range. This modality has a relatively long history of underwater detection and classification of threat divers in a harbor environment. There will be a number of issues with the simple repurposing of existing dive


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.83K | Year: 2010

This proposal describes the Space Plug-and-Play Spectrometer (SPNPS), a spectrometer built in support of the development of rapid-response CubeSat payloads. The goal is to have payloads which can be made to order in days or even hours, through the use of Space Plug-and-Play Avionics (SPA). The SPNPS instrument augments that goal by providing a spectrometer as plug-and-play as any electronic or mechanical component, a spectrometer which can be snapped into place and interchanged with other equivalent-size spectrometers at various wavelengths nearly as efficiently as changing boards in a computer. The spectrometer chosen for this development is the monolithic Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer, a Fourier transform interferometer requiring no moving parts, and no alignment beyond its initial laboratory assembly. A stock of monolithic SHS units for various wavelengths will be constructed, able to be pulled off the shelf at a moment''s notice, clamped, and inserted in the prospective CubeSat payload. The SPNPS is proposed for rocket exhaust plume detection, but has myriad potential uses. BENEFIT: Small size and low operating power enable the SPNPS “SpinUps” sensor to fly on any spacecraft from the smallest (CubeSat) to the largest. Because SPNPS is a relatively simple instrument, it could obtain useful data from almost any Low Earth Orbit (LEO) mission, ranging from three-axis stabilized to spinning. This versatility makes it attractive to a number of different agencies with different missions and needs, including the US Air Force (the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program), The US Navy (the Colony-I concept), NASA and NSF. The potential for CubeSat fleets and robust SPNPS units to be included on Solar System survey missions, and Mission to Planet Earth, is immense. And the NSF has recently begun CubeSat programs of its own. The SPNPS would also have use outside CubeSats, for any satellites seeking lightweight, felxible, directly constructed systems. In the private sector, three top-tier markets for SPNPS application are: (1) oil and gas exploration, (2) mineral exploration, and (3) agriculture. These markets have been selected based on relative application maturity, potential market size, and the number of existing users of multi-spectral imaging in these markets likely to expand their capabilities. Potential partners include Headwall photonics, and Telops.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.22K | Year: 2010

This project develops the Spatial Heterodyne Interferometer for Methane Sounding (SHIMS), a lightweight, compact, robust spectrometer system for remote sensing of methane (CH4) via a series of absorption lines in the ~tetradecad~, over the range 1.6 to 1.7 microns. This instrument will be incorporated into a satellite package, and is capable of being scaled into a 2- to 3-U CubeSat payload size. The end result of this project will be: (1) a full nadir-viewing near IR spectrometer system, featuring the first-ever high-resolution monolithic Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer for the near IR range; and, (2) a separate prototype of the first-ever SHS monolith with dedicated, built-in output optics which attach directly to the SHS monolith and to a detector via a standard c-mount adapter. This innovation will circumvent the need for the user to incorporate separate optics outside the monolith, making the unit even more end-user-ready.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 389.81K | Year: 2011

The electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) source is rapidly becoming the de facto standard source for accelerator applications where a reliable, robust, and low maintenance source of positive ions is needed for a particular application. As a result, a wide variety of ECR sources have been developed for specific accelerator applications ranging from isotope production to proton therapy to ion implantation and industrial processing. Note however that even the simplest of these sources is relatively large and requires hundreds of kilowatts of RF power. Electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) sources used for industrial processing, such as ion implantation, are larger still. A small, lightweight, and reliable high-current source of singly ionized atoms could have a revolutionary impact on accelerator systems and industrial processing. The design of a miniature ECR (miniECR) ion source, developed under a Phase I grant, is considerably smaller and more compact than those available today. This source makes judicious use of dielectric materials to shrink the dimensions of the ion source to values significantly smaller than the free-space wavelength (~12 cm). An additional benefit of this small size is a reduction in RF power required to energize the source from hundreds of Watts to less than 100 Watts. The design of the miniECR source was completed in Phase I and two sources were fabricated for testing. The proposed Phase II program characterizes miniECR sources under a variety of conditions specific to different missions. In particular, beams of protons produced by a miniECR source will be characterized to optimize the source for proton-beam accelerators (isotope production, proton therapy, etc.). Operation of a miniECR source with deuterium ions will be characterized to optimize source parameters for neutron sources. Finally, characterization of a miniECR source operating with heavy ions optimizes the source for production of ions suitable for ion implantation and as a source of ions for tuning charge-breeder injection lines. The small size of the miniECR source, coupled with the inherent ruggedness and reliability of ECR sources, simplifies considerably the ion injector of proton accelerators and neutron sources. The small size also enables large ion implantation sources to be replaced with an array of miniECR sources. Additionally a linear array of miniECR sources enables wafer processing by sweeping a line source of ions across the wafer. This approach is not possible with existing ion implantation systems and enables a new paradigm in ion implantation processing that is more compatible with the large-aperture bending magnets used to isolate a particular ion species for implanting in the wafer.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 80.00K | Year: 2010

Based on its extensive experience designing, building, testing, and operating the High Frequency Marine Mammal Mitigation Sonar (HF/M3), the Integrated Marine Mammal Monitoring and Protection System (IMAPS), and the Swimmer Detection Sonar Network (SDSN), Scientific Solutions, Inc. proposes to develop a simple, compact, and low power active sonar for short-range detection, localization, and tracking of marine mammals. The requirement is for all the electronics and processing to integrate with an AN/SSQ-125 (A-size) sonobuoy. Preliminary analysis shows that a low source level of 173 dB re µPa2 @ 1 m should be possible while still achieving a range of 300 m and a bearing accuracy on the order of 10 degrees. The approached to be used is that of the SDSN system, simple fixed beams vice the use of a complex phased array system. The fine-bearing algorithm developed and proven for the SDSN will be used to determine bearing. In Phase 1 the feasibility of implementing the sonar will be assessed including integration with the AN/SSQ-125 source buoy. In Phase 2 a prototype of the mitigation sonar will be developed and tested at NUWC’s Lake Seneca test facility, using simulated marine mammal targets that SSI has already developed and tested.

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