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Midiri M.,University of Palermo | La Grutta L.,University of Palermo | Grassedonio E.,University of Palermo | Toia P.,University of Palermo | And 2 more authors.
Current Vascular Pharmacology | Year: 2015

Myocardial infarction is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Myocardial infarction may represent a major catastrophic event leading to severe hemodynamic failure or sudden death or it may occur repeatedly in patients with established heart disease. In this context, the role of imaging techniques may become useful for the understanding of the determinants in a preclinical setting before acute coronary events, and for an accurate and correct diagnosis of myocardial infarction. Three-dimensional noninvasive imaging techniques, such as Cardiac CT (CCT) and Cardiac MR imaging (CMR) were widely developed in the last two decades. These imaging techniques may provide new insights into understanding, assessment and follow-up of myocardial infarction. CCT is mainly oriented to morphological assessment including applications such as the detection of coronary artery stenoses even in acute settings, the evaluation of coronary atherosclerotic burden, and the follow-up of patients with known coronary artery disease who underwent myocardial revascularization. On the other hand, CMR is the reference standard for the functional assessment of the heart with evaluation of volumes, mass, and contractility of the ventricles. CMR myocardial viability imaging with delayed contrast enhancement has become broadly accepted for the detection and characterization of the extent of acute and chronic myocardial infarction. © 2015 Bentham Science Publishers. Source


Guglielmi G.,University of Foggia | Guglielmi G.,Scientific Institute Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital | Damilakis J.,University of Crete | Solomou G.,University of Crete | And 2 more authors.
Radiologia Medica | Year: 2012

Recent advances in the densitometric and imaging techniques involved in the management of osteoporosis are associated with increasing accuracy and precision as well as with higher exposure to ionising radiation. Therefore, special attention to quality assurance (QA) procedures is needed in this field. The development of effective and efficient QA programmes is mandatory to guarantee optimal image quality while reducing radiation exposure levels to the ALARA principle (as low as reasonably achievable). In this review article, the basic QA procedures are discussed for the techniques applied to everyday clinical practice. © 2012 Springer-Verlag Italia. Source


Anselmetti G.C.,Candiolo Hospital Turin | Muto M.,Neuroradiology Cardarelli Hospital Naples | Guglielmi G.,University of Foggia | Guglielmi G.,Scientific Institute Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital | Masala S.,University of Rome Tor Vergata
Radiologic Clinics of North America | Year: 2010

Percutaneous vertebral augmentation techniques performed with vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty are safe and effective for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures, primary or secondary spine tumors, and selected traumatic fractures. This article compares the procedures and outlines their advantages and disadvantages. It concludes that vertebroplasty should be performed in most cases, but kyphoplasty is preferable in selected cases. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. Source


Damilakis J.,University of Crete | Guglielmi G.,University of Foggia | Guglielmi G.,Scientific Institute Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital
Radiologic Clinics of North America | Year: 2010

The importance of quality assurance in bone densitometry facilities has been widely recognized. Bone densitometry service should be characterized by a good quality control program and standardization of practice. The primary aim is to ensure reproducible and consistent results at low radiation burden to patients. The establishment of a program of staff continuing education and training is important to maintain or improve the quality of the work. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. Source


Griffith J.F.,Chinese University of Hong Kong | Guglielmi G.,University of Foggia | Guglielmi G.,Scientific Institute Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital
Radiologic Clinics of North America | Year: 2010

Vertebral fractures are usually the first to occur in osteoporosis, provide indisputable evidence of reduced bone strength, and are frequently a harbinger of further vertebral and nonvertebral fracture. Radiologists are best placed to draw attention to the presence of vertebral fractures, most of which are clinically silent. Magnetic resonance imaging supplemented if necessary by computed tomography is usually sufficient to enable distinction between osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic vertebral fracture, without a need for percutaneous biopsy. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. Source

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