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Lauffenburger D.A.,Massachusetts Institute of Technology | VanHook A.M.,Science Signaling
Science Signaling | Year: 2013

This Podcast features an interview with Douglas Lauffenburger, author of a Research Article that appears in the 6 August 2013 issue of Science Signaling. In many types of cancers, cell growth is driven by changes in the activities of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Drugs that target RTKs are used to treat various cancers, but tumor cells often become resistant to the drugs and resume growth. By analyzing a public collection of data on cancer cell lines, Meyer et al. found that increased signaling by the receptor tyrosine kinase AXL predicts the development of resistance to inhibitors of the RTK ErbB. ErbB and AXL cooperated to promote cell migration in triple-negative breast cancer cells, suggesting that simultaneously inhibiting AXL and ErbB may be more effective than treating with ErbB inhibitors alone. Source


Gough N.R.,Science Signaling
Science Signaling | Year: 2016

This Focus Issue highlights research into cell-specific regulation of store-operated calcium entry through the ORAI/STIM channel complex. Understanding the properties of these channels and how ORAI activity is regulated will lead to a better molecular view of immune cell function and diseases involving the immune system. Source


Gough N.R.,Science Signaling
Science Signaling | Year: 2016

Cells are the targets of anticancer therapy, whether the therapy is directed at the tumor cells themselves or the cells of the immune system. Articles in this issue and in the 2015 Science Signaling archives provide insights into what makes a cell responsive to therapy and how understanding the cellular processes affected by the drugs (including endosomal trafficking and response to proteotoxic stress) can lead to personalized cancer therapies, thereby minimizing side effects and ineffective treatment strategies. Copyright 2016 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science; all rights reserved. Source


Ye K.,Emory University | Van Hook A.M.,Science Signaling
Science Signaling | Year: 2013

This Podcast features an interview with Keqiang Ye, author of a Research Article that appears in the 9 July 2013 issue of Science Signaling. Glioblastoma is the most common form of aggressive brain cancer, and many glioblastomas contain mutations that cause overactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which promotes cell proliferation. In addition to mutations that increase EGFR signaling, some of the most aggressive glioblastomas also have mutations in the gene that encodes PTEN, the phosphatase and tensin homolog which is a tumor suppressor that inhibits cell proliferation. In a study published in the current issue of Science Signaling, a group led by Keqiang Ye reports their discovery of a small molecule that blocks EGFR activation and inhibits the growth of glioblastoma cells, even when those cells also lack PTEN. © 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved. Source


Foley J.F.,Science Signaling
Science Signaling | Year: 2013

This Focus Issue of Science Signaling, which complements the Science Special Issue on Inflammation, includes research that reveals regulators of a receptor implicated in an inflammatory bowel disease, as well as the contribution of a matrix metalloproteinase to skin inflammation. Perspectives discuss the role of proinflammatory cytokines in brain inflammatory disorders and the regulation of multiple types of cell death in tissues in response to proinflammatory factors. Together with content from the Science Signaling Archives, these articles underline the importance of understanding the basis of inflammatory responses that can both protect and harm the host. © 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science. Source

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