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Chiraratananon S.,King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi | Chiraratananon S.,Science and Technology Postgraduate Education and Research Development Office | Hien V.D.,Asian Institute of Technology
Energy and Buildings | Year: 2011

In Thailand, traditional houses and public buildings were constructed from materials of low thermal mass. Windows and doors in such buildings are well shaded. Open windows, doors, and even gaps in the raised floor allow all interior spaces in a building to be naturally ventilated. Prior to the introduction of air-conditioning, concrete began to replace wood as walling material. New large air-conditioned buildings have glazed and closed windows so all interior spaces require air-conditioning and forced ventilation. Under the present situation, there is a tendency to believe in the merit of thermally massive walls. This paper presents results from an experimental and simulation study on comparative energy and economic performance of thermally light and massive walls that are used to enclose air-conditioned spaces. The spaces are assumed to serve three residential functions and three commercial functions. Results related to residential functions reaffirm the merits of vernacular architecture. Results related to commercial functions are mixed. However, very massive walls are not economical. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source


Chirarattananon S.,King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi | Chirarattananon S.,Science and Technology Postgraduate Education and Research Development Office | Hien V.D.,Asian Institute of Technology | Tummu P.,King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi
Energy and Buildings | Year: 2012

Traditional houses and public buildings in Thailand were constructed from materials of low thermal mass and the walls were not insulated. Brick and concrete began to replace wood as walling material before air-conditioning was introduced into the country. New large buildings have glazed and closed windows so interior spaces require air-conditioning and forced ventilation. Up to the present, no insulation is used on walls. This paper presents results from an experimental and simulation study on comparative energy and economic performance of walls used to enclose air-conditioned spaces. The walls are externally and internally insulated to different thicknesses. The spaces are assumed to serve three commercial functions. Results show that insulation can generally help improve thermal performance of walls, but the function that a space serves dictates where insulation should be placed and how cost effective it is. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. Source


Taengchum T.,King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi | Chirarattananon S.,King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi | Chirarattananon S.,Science and Technology Postgraduate Education and Research Development Office
Energy Procedia | Year: 2015

Light pipes can bring daylight from the sky into deep interior spaces of a building. A pipe is often connected with a bend so as to capture more light. Another bend is connected before the exit port to optimize delivery of light into a room. This paper presents results of modeling, experiment, and simulation of transmission of light through rectangular light pipes. Analytic method of forward raytracing is used for tracing light rays from the source into the bend through to the straight section and through to the bend and then the exit port into the room. The curve surface of the entry bend is modeled as a circular bend section. The interior surface of each section is specular but may have different reflectances. The algorithms of calculation are coded in MATLAB scripts and functions. The interior surfaces of the rectangular light pipe and bends are lined with a film of reflectance of 99.5%. A set of experiments was conducted indoor using an LED lamp as a point source. Results of calculation using the method match closely with those from experiments. © 2015 Published by Elsevier Ltd. Source


Samuhatananon S.,King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi | Chirarattananon S.,King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi | Chirarattananon S.,Science and Technology Postgraduate Education and Research Development Office | Chirarattananon P.,University of Cambridge
LEUKOS - Journal of Illuminating Engineering Society of North America | Year: 2011

This paper presents results of modeling, experiments, and simulation of transmission of beam and diffuse daylight through straight circular light pipes with and without bends. Analytic method is used in the development of an algorithm for tracing light rays that enter, are reflected from interior pipe surfaces, and eventually transmit from a pipe. Each bend section is modeled as a torus. For short straight pipes, the transmitted collimated rays at the exit ports form interesting geometrical patterns. Results from calculation of transmission of beam and diffuse daylight through straight pipes with and without bends match well with results from experiments. The paper also compares results from calculation of transmitted daylight illuminance when measured luminance of 145 standard sky zones are used to form entering rays, and when generated luminance of the same sky zones are used. The method presented is theoretical but lends itself to practical application. © 2011 The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America. Source


Tummu P.,King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi | Chirarattananon S.,King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi | Chirarattananon S.,Science and Technology Postgraduate Education and Research Development Office | Hien V.D.,Asian Institute of Technology | And 3 more authors.
Energy and Buildings | Year: 2013

Vernacular residential houses in Thailand were not heated nor cooled. The walls of such houses were constructed from wood and other light natural materials. Air-conditioning to cool interior spaces is now common and brick and concrete has replaced natural materials for walling. Even when a house is designed for air-conditioning, no insulation is used on the enclosing walls. It is generally believed that thick and heavy walls reduces cooling load in a space but insulation may not and is too costly. This paper presents results from an experimental and simulation study on comparative thermal performance of walls enclosing spaces that are used to serve three residential functions of bedroom, living room, and studio room. The study considers different levels of insulation and its placement at the interior and exterior surfaces on walls with and without windows, and for each functional use of a space. Use of external shading and blinds or curtain is not considered in this study. In all cases, the study concludes that insulation placed at interior wall surface improves wall thermal performance and is superior to that of exterior placement. The latter part appears to contrast with what have been found in similar studies taken under cool climate. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. Source

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