Science and Technical

Christchurch, New Zealand

Science and Technical

Christchurch, New Zealand
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Greene T.C.,Science and Technical | Westbrooke I.M.,Science and Technical | Brown D.,Science and Technical | Dilks P.J.,Science and Technical
Notornis | Year: 2014

Abstract The minimum population size of Kermadec parakeets (Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae cyanurus) is reported for Macauley Island in the southern Kermadec Islands group. To minimise population impacts of any accidental parakeet deaths the confirmed presence of a minimum population of 3,000 parakeets was required prior to the attempted eradication of Pacific rats (Rattus exulans) from Macauley Island. Eight pre-defined vegetation strata were identified and 4 count methods ranging from simple counts to distance sampling were assigned to each strata depending on sampling conditions. As the resultant point estimate of 3,484 parakeets during the 29 June to 1 July 2006 survey period was greater than the minimum threshold the rat eradication was able to proceed. The potential impacts of changes in the vegetation on the population dynamics of Kermadec parakeets and recommendations for future monitoring of this species on Macauley Island are discussed. © The Ornithological Society of New Zealand Inc.


Pryde M.A.,Science and Technical | Pickerell G.,CMB 14056 | Coats G.,PO Box 523 | Hill G.S.,Te Anau Area Office | And 2 more authors.
New Zealand Journal of Zoology | Year: 2013

Racumin® paste is an anticoagulant toxin increasingly being used for rodent control throughout New Zealand. Sachets containing Racumin® paste were distributed within the Eglinton Valley, Fiordland between July and November 2006 as part of a control operation targeting ship rats (Rattus rattus). Although the paste sachets were contained within bait stations, rats and possums were able to pull the sachets out of the stations exposing birds to the toxin. During a study of the breeding success of South Island robins (Petroica australis) within the Eglinton Valley, 50% of the robin pairs were known to be exposed to Racumin®. Direct consumption of baits or traces of Racumin® in several dead nestlings were noted. If bait sachets are unable to be secured, the use of this form of the toxin in areas where robins are present needs to be carefully considered or alternative toxins and matrices used. © 2013 Copyright The Royal Society of New Zealand.

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