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Davey T.,SASA Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture | Carnegie S.F.,SASA Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture | Saddler G.S.,SASA Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture | Mitchell W.J.,Heriot - Watt University
Plant Pathology | Year: 2014

Potato mop-top virus (PMTV), the cause of spraing in potato tubers, is transmitted by Spongospora subterranea, the cause of powdery scab, and by planting infected seed tubers. This study was undertaken to determine the relative importance of these sources of infection in seed potato production in Scotland. The transmission of PMTV from tested seed tubers to daughter plants was examined over 2 years and six cultivars. The development of foliar symptoms varied with year and cultivar. Infection of daughter tubers derived from PMTV-infected seed tubers was more prevalent on plants affected by foliar symptoms than those without symptoms. The rate of transmission of PMTV from infected seed tubers to daughter tubers ranged from 18 to 54%. Transmission was affected by cultivar and by origin of seed tubers used for a cultivar, but not by a cultivar's sensitivity to PMTV infection. The incidence of PMTV in daughter tubers of cv. Cara grown from seed potatoes from one source (common origin) by more than 25 seed producers was examined over two successive generations. The incidence of PMTV in daughter tubers was not correlated with that in the seed tubers but appeared to be strongly associated with soil inoculum. The incidence of PMTV was correlated with powdery scab in those crops in which both were present. There was some evidence from soil tests conducted in 2006 using a tomato bait plant and real-time RT-PCR that planting PMTV-infected seed potatoes could increase the risk of introducing the virus into land not infested by PMTV. © 2013 British Society for Plant Pathology. Source


Carnegie S.F.,SASA Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture | Davey T.,SASA Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture | Saddler G.S.,SASA Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture
Plant Pathology | Year: 2010

Potato mop-top virus (PMTV) causes disease in both the growing plant and tubers (spraing) of potato and is transmitted by the plasmodiophorid Spongospora subterranea, the cause of powdery scab. The effect of temperature during plant growth on the transmission of PMTV from infected seed tubers and from infested growing media was investigated in a series of glasshouse experiments. Symptoms developed on foliage of plants derived from infected seed tubers but none developed when PMTV was transmitted by S. subterranea in soil. The incidence of foliar symptoms was greatest on plants grown at 12°C, less at 16°C, few at 20°C and absent at 24°C. The transmission of PMTV from infected seed tubers was not significantly affected by temperatures between 12 and 24°C, but when the virus was transmitted by S. subterranea, minimal tuber infection occurred at 24°C and no differences were recorded at temperatures between 12 and 20°C. The incidence of powdery scab on tubers was greatest at 12 and 16°C and very low at 20 and 24°C. However, the incidence and severity of root galling caused by S. subterranea, was greatest at 20 and very low at 24°C. The incidence of powdery scab was greater on tubers of plants derived from infected seed tubers grown in a fluctuating temperature regime of 12 h at 20°C followed by 24 h at 12°C than on those grown at a constant 20°C, whereas the incidence of tuber infection by PMTV and spraing was similar for both regimes. This demonstrates that infection of roots can occur at a higher temperature than that for powdery scab on tubers and that this root infection can enable the transmission of PMTV into the potato plant. © 2009 BSPP. Source

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