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News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

ST. LOUIS, MO, December 09, 2016-- Crystalle M. Cotton, Event Volunteer - Technical Support of WITS - Web Innovations & Technology Services, has been recognized for showing dedication, leadership and excellence in information technology.Worldwide Branding, the world's leading international personal branding organization, is proud to endorse the notable professional efforts and accomplishments of Crystalle M. Cotton. A member in good standing, Ms. Cotton parlays 15 years' experience into her professional network, and has been noted for achievements, leadership abilities, and the credentials she has provided in association with her Worldwide Branding membership.Ms. Cotton is a passionate professional with a background in information science, information technology, customer service and sales. She possesses the ability to work as an individual or as part of a team to complete projects and assignments in a timely manner, and she always takes responsibility for work actions. Since July 2016, she has been attending CoderGirl, a Launch Code group, to refresh and hone her computer science skills. She is adept at providing technical support using the skills that she has gained.To prepare for her career, Ms. Cotton earned a Bachelor of Science in management information systems and information systems at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, where she earned a 4.0 GPA in 2004. She has also earned a Silver Level National Career Readiness Certificate, as well as a PC Basics certificate from the National Computer Science Academy. Additionally, she has been recognized numerous times by The International Women's Leadership Association.Worldwide Branding has added Ms. Cotton to their distinguished Registry of Executives, Professionals and Entrepreneurs. While inclusion in Worldwide Branding is an honor, only small selections of members in each discipline are endorsed and promoted as leaders in their professional fields.About Worldwide BrandingFor more than 15 years, Worldwide Branding has been the leading, one-stop-shop, personal branding company, in the United States and abroad. From writing professional biographies and press releases, to creating and driving Internet traffic to personal websites, our team of branding experts tailor each product specifically for our clients' needs. From health care to finance to education and law, our constituents represent every major industry and occupation, at all career levels.For more information, please visit http://www.worldwidebranding.com


Kim H.,University of Tennessee at Knoxville | Helmbrecht E.E.,University of Tennessee at Knoxville | Blaine Stalans M.,University of Tennessee at Knoxville | Schmitt C.,University of Tennessee at Knoxville | And 4 more authors.
Plant Physiology | Year: 2011

Ethylene influences many processes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) through the action of five receptor isoforms. We used high-resolution, time-lapse imaging of dark-grown Arabidopsis seedlings to better understand the roles of each isoform in the regulation of growth in air, ethylene-stimulated nutations, and growth recovery after ethylene removal. We found that ETHYLENE RECEPTOR1 (ETR1) is both necessary and sufficient for nutations. Transgene constructs in which the ETR1 promoter was used to drive expression of cDNAs for each of the five receptor isoforms were transferred into etr1-6;etr2-3;ein4-4 triple loss-of-function mutants that have constitutive growth inhibition in air, fail to nutate in ethylene, and take longer to recover a normal growth rate when ethylene is removed. The patterns of rescue show that ETR1, ETR2, and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE4 (EIN4) have the prominent roles in rapid growth recovery after removal of ethylene whereas ETR1 was the sole isoform that rescued nutations. ETR1 histidine kinase activity and phosphotransfer through the receiver domain are not required to rescue nutations. However, REVERSION TO SENSITIVITY1 modulates ethylene-stimulated nutations but does not modulate the rate of growth recovery after ethylene removal. Several chimeric receptor transgene constructs where domains of EIN4 were swapped into ETR1 were also introduced into the triple mutant. The pattern of phenotype rescue by the chimeric receptors used in this study supports a model where a receptor with a receiver domain is required for normal growth recovery and that nutations specifically require the full-length ETR1 receptor. © 2011 American Society of Plant Biologists.


Katipoglu-Yazan T.,Technical University of Istanbul | Pala-Ozkok I.,Technical University of Istanbul | Ubay-Cokgor E.,Technical University of Istanbul | Orhon D.,Technical University of Istanbul | Orhon D.,Science Academy
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2013

The study evaluated acute impact of erythromycin and tetracycline on nitrification and organic carbon removal kinetics in mixed microbial culture. Acclimated biomass was obtained from a fill and draw reactor fed with peptone mixture selected as synthetic substrate and operated at a sludge age of 10. days. Acute inhibition was tested in batch reactors involving a control unit started solely with substrate and the others with additional doses of each antibiotic. Modeling indicated that both steps of nitrification were totally blocked by erythromycin. Tetracycline inhibited and retarded nitrification kinetics at 50. mg/L and stopped nitrite oxidation at 200. mg/L, leading to nitrite accumulation. Both antibiotics also affected organic carbon removal by inducing partial inactivation of the heterotrophic community in the culture, increased substrate storage and accelerated endogenous respiration, with a relatively slight impact on heterotrophic growth. Major inhibitory effect was on process stoichiometry, leading to partial utilization of organic substrate. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Pala-Ozkok I.,Technical University of Istanbul | Orhon D.,Technical University of Istanbul | Orhon D.,Science Academy
Biochemical Engineering Journal | Year: 2013

This study evaluated the chronic impact of erythromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, on microbial activities, mainly focusing on changes in process kinetics induced on substrate biodegradation and all related biochemical processes of microbial metabolism. Experiments involved two fill/draw reactors sustained at steady state at two different sludge ages of 10 and 2.0 days, fed with peptone mixture and continuous erythromycin dosing of 50. mg/L. Oxygen uptake rate profiles were generated in a series of parallel batch reactors seeded with biomass from fill/draw systems at selected periods of steady-state operation. Experimental data were evaluated by model calibration reflecting inhibitory effect on process kinetics: continuous erythromycin dosing inhibited microbial growth, reduced the rate of hydrolysis, blocked substrate storage and accelerated endogenous respiration. Adverse impact was mainly due to changes inflicted on the composition of microbial community. Interruption of erythromycin feeding resulted in partial recovery of microbial response. Sludge age affected the nature of inhibition, indicating different process kinetics for faster growing microbial community. Kinetic evaluation additionally revealed the toxic effect of erythromycin, which inactivated a fraction of biomass. Mass balance using oxygen uptake rate data also identified a stoichiometric impact, where a fraction of available substrate, although completely removed, could not be utilized in metabolic activities. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: phys.org

But for a girl who has adapted to living a life with a left arm that ends just past her elbow, there's no instruction manual for how to incorporate this new technology into her day. That will be up to her to figure out. And researchers at the biomaterials laboratory will be studying her, trying to figure it out, too. Delanie Gallagher of Spanish Lake is the first of 10 children researchers plan to enroll in a study trying to determine how to develop a prosthetic that is useful for children born with all or part of a limb missing, or who lose a limb through trauma or surgery. Most end up living without a prosthetic because it lacks function and only gets in the way. Of the more than 540,000 Americans living with upper limb amputations, only about 20 percent use a prosthetic. Delanie's new arm incorporates myoelectric technology - sensors that detect when muscles in the stump contract and signal parts in the prosthetic to move. Prosthetics with this technology typically cost from $25,000 to $50,000, making them unfeasible for fast-growing children. The WashU lab created a hard plastic arm using a 3-D printer at a cost of just a few hundred dollars. The myoelectric technology was kept simple enough to keep the prosthetic low-cost and lightweight, with one sensor that signals the hand to either open or close, or the wrist to turn. Nick Thompson, a scientist in the lab, hopes the simple route will make arm prostheses more accessible and useful to children. "Tons of people are doing this now, but they are reaching for the fruit high in the tree, trying to develop something with the most functionality that is the closest you can get to your biological limb," Thompson said. "We are going the opposite. We are looking for something quick that can be made and modified quickly. That is our goal." But the big question is how useful it will be. Delanie is proof of how children overcome. She had difficulty thinking of something that she can't already do. What does she hope her new prosthetic will help her do? "I don't know," Delanie said. "I don't know what I can do." Delanie's mom, Janet Gallagher, remembered when Delanie was a baby and got her first prosthetic to help her crawl. "She just dragged it along," Gallagher said. It was quickly tossed aside. Delanie has had two other prostheses, used only to help her steady and steer her bike, hold up a fishing pole or brace her bow and arrow. "It didn't help her," Gallagher said. "She could do better without it." Using her stump, Delanie figured out how to color, use scissors, tie her shoes, braid her hair, put her hair in a ponytail and play the piano. On a recent day at school at the Gateway Science Academy in south St. Louis, she needed no help. She carried her books in a shoulder bag rather than a backpack. She held a pencil sharpener in the crook of her elbow as she turned her pencil. She played with a piece of clay, molding it into a flower between her stump and hand. She twirled her hair with her stump, raised it high when the teacher sought answers from the class. At lunch, Delanie ripped open bags with her teeth and braced her Capri Sun against her body so she could stab it with a straw. When the English teacher read a book aloud, no one batted an eye at a quote by a character who lost part of her leg from a land mine: "Every day, I wished I had it back." Delanie's fifth-grade classmates say they are excited about her new robotic arm, but they are used to how she is. "It's going to be cool, but she does so much without it," her best friend, Georgia Collier, said. "It's going to be different." Gallagher said Delanie sometimes worries about her future. She wonders how she will drive a car, if she will be able to take care of children. As she enters her preteen years, she's figuring out new things like how to hold a blow dryer, put on makeup and curl her hair. Delanie definitely likes how the new arm looks. She asked that it be pink, engraved with her initials. She named it Rosy Pink Petunia Gallagher. Dr. Charles Goldfarb, a WashU orthopedic surgeon at St. Louis Children's Hospital who cares for children with amputated limbs, said a prosthetic can have social benefits. "Can we help her do more things a little similar to her peers?" Goldfarb said. That may become more important as she gets older. "A teenager wants to be like any other teenager," he said. The Minimally Invasive Surgery Biomaterials Lab opened on the medical campus just over three years ago. Its focus was using a 3-D printer to create and test bioabsorbable surgical mesh. In 2014, the lab learned of three engineering students whose senior project involved using a 3-D printer to create a prosthetic for 13-year-old Sydney Kendall who had lost her arm six years earlier in a boating accident. That sparked the start of the lab's work with prosthetic arms. "We asked, 'Can we take this up and improve what the students have worked on?'" Thompson said. A wire in the arm the students created for Sydney was connected to a sensor in her shoulder. Shrugging her shoulder caused the hand to open or close. The wire was cumbersome, she told the scientists, and difficult to use. So, the lab printed a prosthetic with a myoelectric sensor inside its socket that could move the hand and wrist and gave it to Sydney. She found it needed a stronger grip and was heavy. They refined it again, printing her another last spring. The process offered promise. "It justified to do this type of study on pediatric patients," Thompson said. "That's where we are now." Scientists hope a study of more children will give them feedback on how to overcome what they refer to as "Sydney Syndrome" - the prosthetic sitting in a drawer collecting dust. Participants will complete questionnaires three months, six months and a year after getting their prostheses. "Now we feel we have a design that is of high enough utility to try on multiple patients to see if there's any benefit from using them," Thompson said. "The patients will tell us what directions we need to go in to make it better." The study is funded by a $10,000 grant from the St. Louis Children's Hospital Foundation. Low-cost 3-D printing makes it feasible. A 3-D printer works like a regular ink printer, but instead of ink, it prints layers of heated plastic to create models designed with a computer program. The technology dates to the 1980s and was used in manufacturing to make machine parts. In the 2000s, consumers began buying home printers to make jewelry or toys. In the past several years, surgeons have created models of organs and tumors to plan for surgeries. And researchers are experimenting with using materials to print heart valves, stents and skull fragments. The science is advancing rapidly. "The concept of 3-D printing has flipped the prosthetic world over," Goldfarb said, not just in terms of the possibilities, but also in its purpose. "For forever, our goal with a prosthetic has been to make something unobtrusive and unnoticeable with the same skin tone. But it doesn't do much," Goldfarb said. "These prostheses look nothing like your arm. They look like superhero arms. They are bold and distinctive looking. "The difference philosophically is we're making arms that say, 'Hey, look at me. I've got a great, cool arm; and I'm not trying to hide it. It's part of who I am.' ... It's a different concept, and it's helpful for a lot of kids." Back in the lab, as technicians tested the myolectric sensor in Delanie's new arm, the sensor wasn't consistently picking up the signal to move the wrist. After more than an hour of trying to find the problem, they determined Delanie will have to figure out how to best position the arm so the sensor picks up the signal from her muscle. "That's the learning curve for her. No one can do it except her," Thompson said. "As she wears it more and more, she'll figure out how it feels when it's in the best spot." Delanie's dad, Joe Gallagher, joked she's not allowed to hold eggs with it yet. "If she gets to move it three times out of 10, that's a good thing," her father said. "It's a learning process." While the family is wondering how the robotic arm might help Delanie with what she can already do, they don't have expectations that the science will be life-changing - at least for her. But with Delanie's help, scientists could someday develop a useful prosthetic for a child who suddenly loses an arm. Or one that a child with a congenital defect could use as a toddler. Delanie is excited, her parents said, mostly about helping other kids. "She says, 'I'm helping make an arm for people who lose it or for people who are born like me,'" her mom said. "She's looking at it as, 'I'm making history, and helping makes lives better.'"


In memorium: Ralph J. Cicerone, former US Science Academy president and outspoken advocate for science Ralph J. Cicerone, who served as president of the US National Academy of Sciences (NAS) from 1 July 2005 through June of this year, died 5 November at his home in New Jersey. He was 73. Cicerone was a world-renowned atmospheric scientist whose research placed him at the forefront in shaping science and environmental policy, both nationally and internationally. His accomplishments include the restoration and renovation of the historic NAS building on the National Mall, the creation of a $500 million Gulf Research Program following the Deepwater Horizon disaster, two visits to NAS by President Barak Obama, and a number of influential studies that helped to define the causes, extent, and effects of global climate change. Ralph Cicerone (left) shaking hands with President Barack Obama. White House science adviser John Holdren is pictured in the center in this photo taken on 27 April 2009 during the president's visit to the National Academy of Sciences to address its annual meeting. Credit: White House photo In 2001, he led a key NAS study about climate change requested by President George W. Bush. Ten years later, under Cicerone's leadership, a comprehensive set of reports titled America's Climate Choices were issued, calling for action on reducing greenhouse gas emissions while identifying strategies to help the nation and world adapt to a changing climate. Under Cicerone's guidance, the NAS and the Royal Society -- the science academy of the UK -- teamed up in 2014 to produce Climate Change: Evidence and Causes, a clearly written publication for policymakers, educators, and members of the general public. "The entire scientific community is mourning the sudden and untimely loss of this great leader who has been unexpectedly removed from the forefront of the scientific issues that matter most to the future well-being of society," said Marcia McNutt, Cicerone's successor as president of the NAS. "Ralph Cicerone was a model for all of us of not only doing what counts, but doing it with honesty, integrity, and deep passion."


In memorium: Ralph J. Cicerone, former US Science Academy president and outspoken advocate for science Ralph J. Cicerone, who served as president of the US National Academy of Sciences (NAS) from 1 July 2005 through June of this year, died 5 November at his home in New Jersey. He was 73. Cicerone was a world-renowned atmospheric scientist whose research placed him at the forefront in shaping science and environmental policy, both nationally and internationally. His accomplishments include the restoration and renovation of the historic NAS building on the National Mall, the creation of a $500 million Gulf Research Program following the Deepwater Horizon disaster, two visits to NAS by President Barak Obama, and a number of influential studies that helped to define the causes, extent, and effects of global climate change. Ralph Cicerone (left) shaking hands with President Barack Obama. White House science adviser John Holdren is pictured in the center in this photo taken on 27 April 2009 during the president's visit to the National Academy of Sciences to address its annual meeting. Credit: White House photo In 2001, he led a key NAS study about climate change requested by President George W. Bush. Ten years later, under Cicerone's leadership, a comprehensive set of reports titled America's Climate Choices were issued, calling for action on reducing greenhouse gas emissions while identifying strategies to help the nation and world adapt to a changing climate. Under Cicerone's guidance, the NAS and the Royal Society -- the science academy of the UK -- teamed up in 2014 to produce Climate Change: Evidence and Causes, a clearly written publication for policymakers, educators, and members of the general public. "The entire scientific community is mourning the sudden and untimely loss of this great leader who has been unexpectedly removed from the forefront of the scientific issues that matter most to the future well-being of society," said Marcia McNutt, Cicerone's successor as president of the NAS. "Ralph Cicerone was a model for all of us of not only doing what counts, but doing it with honesty, integrity, and deep passion."


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.sciencemag.org

This is an update to our ongoing coverage of the political purge of academia underway in Turkey in the wake of a failed coup attempt in July. In a surprise decree issued this past weekend, Turkey's government announced the firing of more than 1000 academics at public universities. Many of those fired are learning of their fate by finding themselves on a long list of names that the government released. The government also announced that it will now directly appoint the leaders of Turkey's universities. Insiders say that the government has long held de facto control over the election of university rectors, but that the new decree simply makes the government's control of academic leadership official. Turkey's Science Academy issued a statement in Turkish this week. "Allowing a central authority ... to decide on how every institution—especially universities where specialization is at the highest level—should conduct its affairs means to entrust the entire country to the supposed infallibility of a single individual in a world where economy and technology advance at an immense pace," it reads. "This goes against democracy and rationality."


News Article | March 23, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

When he labelled outspoken academics as terrorists, Turkey’s increasingly authoritarian President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan was probably not thinking of Voltaire’s eighteenth-century philosophical maxim: “To hold a pen is to be at war”. Erdoğan sent shivers down the spines of those who care about human rights by declaring on 14 March that those who support terrorists are as guilty as those “who pull the trigger”, and that Turkish law should be changed to reflect this. “The fact that an individual is a deputy, an academic, an author, a journalist or the director of an NGO does not change the fact that that person is a terrorist,” he said. One the same day, three academics from universities in Istanbul were hauled into police custody and then refused bail while prosecutors considered charges of making propaganda for a terrorist organization. Their crime? In January, they had signed a petition that called for an end to violence in the southeast of the country, where government forces have been fighting Kurdish separatists. The petition was signed by 1,128 academics, mostly from Turkish universities, when it was publicly launched on 11 January. It immediately sparked Erdoğan’s rage. Many politically appointed university rectors leapt into line, launching disciplinary investigations into members of their staff who had signed — more than 500 so far. Dozens of signatories were brought in for police questioning. The harsh response attracted a shocked solidarity. Another 1,000 people signed the petition, including a large number of Western scientists, before it was closed on 20 January. An atmosphere of uncertainty and fear prevails. None of the signatories knows whether they, too, will be arrested, and several have had death threats. Some have actively sought sabbaticals abroad; those working outside the country are afraid to return even to visit family. Meanwhile, Turkey is playing a major part on the world political stage, in a role that is overshadowing the fate of the academics. Turkey is a geopolitical fulcrum. On one side it borders war-torn Middle East, on the other, strife-ridden Europe that is struggling to cope with the refugee crisis. When the country reached a historic agreement with the European Union last week to take back migrants who were crossing into Europe illegally, many in the EU complained bitterly about making a deal with Erdoğan because of his worrying human-rights record. Terrorist attacks in Turkey are intensifying, some carried out by Kurdish separatists, others by the Islamist group ISIS. Erdoğan’s controversial announcement followed on the heels of a deadly attack in Ankara, and on 19 March, a suicide bomber killed four in Istanbul. Kurdish separatist terrorism had abated during a two-year ceasefire, but that broke down last July. Erdoğan argues that the peace petition, by focusing only on government military attacks on Kurdish militants, which have killed many innocent civilians, and ignoring terrorist attacks and other serious human-rights abuses carried out by the separatists, actively supports terrorism. While appreciating the urgency of a call to peace, many scientists and academics themselves have reservations about the petition, seeing it as unhelpfully confrontational and even intellectually dishonest. But many have still bravely spoken up for the freedom of expression of the signatories. Turkey’s recently formed Science Academy published a strongly supportive statement in January. “The right to express one’s opinions — even if these might be annoying or minority views — is an essential freedom of every citizen and every academic,” it said. The academy should know — it was created by those who resigned en masse from the Turkish Academy of Sciences when Erdoğan took it over by decree in 2011. Scientists everywhere should use their pens and send their support.


News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Electrical and computer engineering professor recognized by the IEEE for outstanding achievement; Erkip's groundbreaking work is helping pave the way for 5G wireless communications BROOKLYN, New York - Elza Erkip, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, will be the 2016 recipient of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Women in Communications Engineering (WICE) Award for her outstanding technical work in communications engineering and for bringing a high degree of visibility to the field. The award will be presented on December 4, 2016, at the Third Women's Workshop on Communications and Signal Processing, held in conjunction with IEEE GLOBECOM, a flagship conference of the IEEE Communications Society (ComSoc) and the world's largest annual gathering of communications engineering professionals from academia, industry, and government. Erkip, a fellow of the IEEE, has received many other honors from the group, and she was recently elected second vice president of the IEEE Information Theory Society; she is scheduled to ascend to the presidency in 2018. She received the IEEE Communications Society Stephen O. Rice Paper Prize in 2004, the IEEE International Conference on Communications' Communication Theory Symposium Best Paper Award in 2007, and the IEEE Communications Society Award for Advances in Communication in 2013. She was a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Information Theory Society from 2013 to 2014 and has held numerous editorship and organizational roles in IEEE publications and conferences over the course of her career. Additionally, Erkip has been elected to the Science Academy Society of Turkey and was among the Thomson Reuters 2014 and 2015 Editions of Highly Cited Researchers. Early in her career, she was selected by the National Science Foundation as one of the country's promising young researchers receiving its CAREER Award. "It's an incredible honor to be given the WICE Award," Erkip said. "I am proud to be a member of IEEE Communications Society and to be of service to its Women in Communications Engineering Committee. To be recognized by my fellow engineers and researchers by this prestigious award is very gratifying." As a faculty member of the research center NYU WIRELESS, Erkip has conducted work that has made significant advances in communications technology. She is one of the pioneers of cooperative networking, and more recently she has been working on 5G wireless systems. "Professor Erkip is an enormous credit to the school - and not only because of the honors she continually accrues," Dean of Engineering Katepalli R. Sreenivasan said. "Her active involvement in the IEEE proves her devotion to the scientific community, and her tireless work to ensure the widespread availability of wireless service proves her commitment to placing technology in service to society. Those are the ideals that we hold in high esteem here at NYU Tandon, and Professor Erkip perfectly embodies them." About the NYU Tandon School of Engineering The NYU Tandon School of Engineering dates to 1854, when the New York University School of Civil Engineering and Architecture as well as the Brooklyn Collegiate and Polytechnic Institute (widely known as Brooklyn Poly) were founded. Their successor institutions merged in January 2014 to create a comprehensive school of education and research in engineering and applied sciences, rooted in a tradition of invention, and entrepreneurship and dedicated to furthering technology in service to society. In addition to its main location in Brooklyn, NYU Tandon collaborates with other schools within the country's largest private research university and is closely connected to engineering programs in NYU Abu Dhabi and NYU Shanghai. It operates business incubators in downtown Manhattan and Brooklyn and an award-winning online graduate program. For more information, visit http://engineering. .

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