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Fresh momentum for particle physics CERN, Europe’s particle physics laboratory, inaugurated its latest linear accelerator on 9 May. The 90-metre-long Linac 4 will produce particles with 3 times the energy possible with its 39-year-old predecessor. Once fully tested, the new accelerator will allow an upgraded version of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to collect experimental data at a much higher rate from 2021. Linac 4 will take over as the first stage in a series of accelerators that together feed the LHC and other experiments at the laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland. Ebola outbreak On 12 May, the World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed an outbreak of the Ebola virus in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where nine suspected cases of the infection have been reported in the past three weeks. Health authorities are now considering whether to deploy an experimental Ebola vaccine against the outbreak. The aid group Médecins Sans Frontières (also known as Doctors Without Borders) is discussing a potential vaccination campaign with the Congolese government that would require the approval of the WHO. India’s GM crops India’s top biotechnology regulator has approved the planting of a genetically modified (GM) breed of mustard, which would be the country’s first GM food crop. The Genetic Engineering Appraisal Committee gave the green light to the seed — which is grown mainly for its oil — on 11 May. But before farmers can sow the mustard, India’s government will also have to approve its cultivation. And the government will need clearance from India’s Supreme Court, which is currently considering a lawsuit filed last year to prevent the mustard’s approval (see Nature 541, 267–268; 2017). Uncertain future The European Union and the United Kingdom will need at least two more years to agree on their future relationship concerning science and higher education, the EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, said on 5 May. A deal concerning Britain’s future participation in EU-funded research and student-exchange programmes is unlikely to be finalized before the United Kingdom leaves the bloc in March 2019, Barnier said at a state of the union event in Florence, Italy. The United Kingdom could continue to participate in European research collaborations as a third country, if it guarantees free movement of EU citizens. Dubious ban Turkey’s Science Academy — an independent organization of Turkish scientists — has declared the government ban on Wikipedia to be unconstitutional. The Turkish government used state-of-emergency powers to block access to Wikipedia on 29 April. It stated that the online encyclopaedia had operated a smear campaign against the country, with some pages implying that Turkey supports terrorist organizations. The academy said on 10 May that the ban deprives citizens of knowledge and open debate and that it “seriously undermines the image of Turkey in the 21st century”. Wikipedia has appealed to Turkey’s constitutional court against the ban. Arctic pact The eight nations that border the Arctic Ocean have agreed to ease rules for cross-border field research in the High North. At an Arctic Council meeting in Fairbanks, Alaska, on 11 May, representatives of the Arctic nations promised to reduce red tape for scientists trying to collect data in the region. The legally binding agreement, signed by Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Russia and the United States, will also give scientists better access to Arctic research facilities such as ice-breaking ships. FDA chief Physician and venture capitalist Scott Gottlieb was sworn in as commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration on 11 May, two days after his confirmation by the Senate. Gottlieb has experience at the agency, including a stint as deputy commissioner for medical and scientific affairs from 2005 to 2007. But he has also previously had extensive financial relationships with the industries he will now be regulating, including roles as a board member and consultant, which has concerned some consumer advocates. Political addition Cédric Villani, a flamboyant French mathematician, is to run for election to the French parliament in June. The 2010 Fields medallist, who heads the Henri Poincaré Institute in Paris, stands for election in the Saclay constituency near Paris, home to a cluster of leading French research institutions. Villani, who joined the campaign of the newly elected president Emmanuel Macron in April, was one of a list of political outsiders whom Macron’s party announced on 11 May as candidates for next month’s elections. Insel leaves Google Psychiatrist Tom Insel left Google on 5 May, 18 months after he started a mental-health programme in the company’s health-sciences division, Verily. Insel, who was formerly director of the US National Institute of Mental Health, will launch his own company, called Mindstrong, to analyse behaviour and mental illness using smartphone data. Co-founders of the company in Palo Alto, California, include Richard Klausner, a former director of the US National Cancer Institute, and Paul Dagum, who holds several patents on ‘digital phenotyping’ methods. Australian budget Australia has started the process of joining the European Southern Observatory (ESO). The government’s 2017–18 federal budget, released on 9 May, includes Aus$26.1 million (US$19.2 million) for optical astronomy research to be carried out in partnership with ESO. The agreement, which guarantees Australian access to major astronomy initiatives and facilities, includes an additional commitment of roughly Aus$12 million a year until 2027–28. Overall science spending from Australia’s federal budget will remain stable. However, government funding for universities will decrease by Aus$384.2 million (2.5%) over 2018 and 2019. Alarm underground The US Department of Energy declared a site-wide emergency at the Hanford nuclear site on 9 May after a tunnel holding contaminated waste partly collapsed. Several thousand workers at the former nuclear-weapons facility in Washington state took shelter while officials deployed a robot to investigate the damage. No contamination was detected, and by the next day, the facility had filled the hole with more than 420 cubic metres of soil. The cold war-era tunnel was one of two that led to a reprocessing plant used to extract plutonium for nuclear weapons from 1956 to 1988. See page 266 for more. Methane control The US Senate has rejected Republican efforts to block a rule limiting methane emissions on federal lands. Three Republicans joined all 48 Democrats in the 51–49 vote on 10 May. The rule, issued in November under former president Barack Obama, requires oil and gas operators to reduce flaring by half on public and tribal lands. Companies must also limit methane venting and regularly inspect equipment for leakage. The US Department of the Interior estimated that the rule would reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas industry by up to 35%. Empty run NASA will not put astronauts on the first full flight of its new heavy-lift rocket, the agency announced on 12 May. That test will also come at least a year later than expected, no earlier than 2019. When complete, the Space Launch System will be the first rocket capable of carrying people beyond low Earth orbit since the Saturn V, which flew astronauts to the Moon from 1968 to 1972. Earlier this year, NASA had looked into whether it could put astronauts on the first test that will couple the enormous rocket to its Orion crew capsule. But cost and schedule delays mean that it will be easier to fly that first mission without astronauts. By 2040, one-third of cases of tuberculosis (TB) in Russia could be drug resistant, according to a study in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. And in India, multi-drug resistance could soar to 12.4% of TB cases. Increased drug resistance in high-burden countries will mostly result from person-to person infections, rather than from non-resistant strains acquiring resistance, the study predicts. Globally, some 10.4 million new cases of TB currently cause around 1.8 million deaths per year. 21–23 May Theoretical physicists gather at a conference in Jerusalem on recent work in general relativity.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Receive press releases from Triad Math and Science Academy: By Email An assembly with Bob Holmes, "The One Man Volleyball Team," has accomplished that goal in thousands of schools. He then delivers the life changing message against bullying, suicide, drugs, alcohol, and not quitting. Greensboro, NC, April 20, 2017 --( An assembly with Bob Holmes, "The One Man Volleyball Team," has accomplished that goal in thousands of schools. He then delivers the life changing message against bullying, suicide, drugs, alcohol, and not quitting. In addition to playing volleyball games against the academy’s boys', girls' and faculty teams, Bob will deliver an inspiring message of hope, encouragement, motivation and challenge to all of the students. In America, every 30 seconds, a teenager attempts suicide. Many of these kids have lost hope for a number of reasons, including broken homes, no adult mentors, etc. Holmes has appeared in over 5,500 gymnasiums, in front of over 3.5 million people. He has 16,400 wins | 365 losses. "The goal of this session is to motivate 100% of our student body in an assembly, and to hope the students take away a positive motivational message," stated Guray Taysever. Guray Taysever is the Director of Triad Math and Science Academy. Greensboro, NC, April 20, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Bob Holmes, World Record Holder and The One Man volleyball team will be in Greensboro on Friday April 21, 2017, to speak to Triad Math and Science Academy students from 8:00 am to 11:30am. He will play the boys team, girls team, and faculty teams by himself. He has inspired kids and adults in this way for over twenty-six years! Bob has won over 16,000 games, including victories over the Baltimore Orioles, Buffalo Bills, Washington Redskins, Pittsburgh Steelers, and Miami Dolphins.An assembly with Bob Holmes, "The One Man Volleyball Team," has accomplished that goal in thousands of schools. He then delivers the life changing message against bullying, suicide, drugs, alcohol, and not quitting.In addition to playing volleyball games against the academy’s boys', girls' and faculty teams, Bob will deliver an inspiring message of hope, encouragement, motivation and challenge to all of the students. In America, every 30 seconds, a teenager attempts suicide. Many of these kids have lost hope for a number of reasons, including broken homes, no adult mentors, etc.Holmes has appeared in over 5,500 gymnasiums, in front of over 3.5 million people. He has 16,400 wins | 365 losses."The goal of this session is to motivate 100% of our student body in an assembly, and to hope the students take away a positive motivational message," stated Guray Taysever. Guray Taysever is the Director of Triad Math and Science Academy. Triad Math and Science Academy Crystal Cavalier 336 621 0061 www.tmsacharter.org To learn more, or to join the 30-Day Challenge, visit: Web: www.tmsacharter.com/30daychallenge Facebook: www.facebook.com/tmsacharter Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Triad Math and Science Academy


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

After a busy school day and at the end of a grueling week, the last thing most students would want to do is spend three hours working out high-level math problems. But on Friday, April 28th, just as they had done all year, six students from Lexington Christian Academy (LCA) piled into a van bound for Canton High School. There, they joined students from 40 other schools for the 45th annual New England Invitational Math Competition. Simply being invited to the tournament was the culmination of many months of hard work for the fledgling team from LCA, which joined the Massachusetts Math League (MML) as the newest team in Division Six earlier this year. From the first divisional meet in October, it was clear that the students would be facing an uphill climb. The team found itself grouped with perennial powerhouse schools like Acton-Boxborough Regional High School, Canton High School, and Lexington High School. “I was amazed at the level of talent from the other schools in our division. They earned perfect scores on so many individual rounds, and sometimes even the team round!” exclaimed sophomore Tim Zhou (Lexington, MA), who also serves as Captain of the Math Team. Tim rallied student support throughout the 2015–2016 school year in order to get a math team formed, funded, and recognized as an official student club group. The team consistently placed in fifth out of seven teams during regular season Meets against the large, veteran public schools in its home division. However, as they continued to press onwards, the young team from LCA eventually finished 8th overall out of the 42 schools in the MML and secured a spot in the State Meet as the highest-scoring “Small” sized institution. They were invited to the State Meet in Shrewsbury on April 3rd to compete against other similarly sized, but unfamiliar schools from the Greater Boston Math League, Western Massachusetts Math League, and more. “The grouping of schools based on enrollment size was a revelation to me,” remarked coach Max Xu. “I saw the State and New England tournaments as our chance to step out from under the long shadows cast by our extraordinary neighbors in MML. Compared to us they seemed simply massive, with student bodies numbering in the thousands and legendary coaches with decades of experience under their belts.” During the State Meet, LCA ultimately placed 4th in the “Small” School Division, earning a ticket to the New England Invitational Math Tournament. This marked the first time in the MML’s 45 year history that a school from Massachusetts made it to the New England Tournament during its first year of competition. The stage was set. On that sweltering Friday afternoon, sixty students from ten other “Small” schools arrived, some from as far as five hours away. As the first six individual rounds unfolded, LCA found itself neck-and-neck with the Advanced Math & Science Academy Charter School (AMSA) from Marlborough, tied for first place and just ahead of veteran schools like Buckingham Browne & Nichols, the Massachusetts Academy of Math & Science at WPI, and the Maine School of Science & Mathematics (MSSM). MML Contest Director, Richard Olson remarked, “What the Lexington Christian Academy Math Team has accomplished this past year speaks volumes about the excellence of the mathematics curriculum at LCA, the commitment of the teachers who instructed these students in their classes, the talent and drive of all the mathletes who competed, and the leadership of their coach!” After the final concluding team round and a dazzling challenge solution submission from AMSA, Lexington Christian Academy ultimately placed 2nd behind AMSA, edging out MSSM to take the runner-up spot. The students headed home exhausted but not quite satisfied with their second-place finish. However, with time left in the school year and the American Regional Math League competition in State College, Pennsylvania looming ahead in June, there’s still plenty of math to come. Lexington Christian Academy is an independent college preparatory school that exists to educate young men and women in the arts and sciences in the context of a complete commitment to the gospel of Jesus Christ.


News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

ST. LOUIS, MO, December 09, 2016-- Crystalle M. Cotton, Event Volunteer - Technical Support of WITS - Web Innovations & Technology Services, has been recognized for showing dedication, leadership and excellence in information technology.Worldwide Branding, the world's leading international personal branding organization, is proud to endorse the notable professional efforts and accomplishments of Crystalle M. Cotton. A member in good standing, Ms. Cotton parlays 15 years' experience into her professional network, and has been noted for achievements, leadership abilities, and the credentials she has provided in association with her Worldwide Branding membership.Ms. Cotton is a passionate professional with a background in information science, information technology, customer service and sales. She possesses the ability to work as an individual or as part of a team to complete projects and assignments in a timely manner, and she always takes responsibility for work actions. Since July 2016, she has been attending CoderGirl, a Launch Code group, to refresh and hone her computer science skills. She is adept at providing technical support using the skills that she has gained.To prepare for her career, Ms. Cotton earned a Bachelor of Science in management information systems and information systems at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, where she earned a 4.0 GPA in 2004. She has also earned a Silver Level National Career Readiness Certificate, as well as a PC Basics certificate from the National Computer Science Academy. Additionally, she has been recognized numerous times by The International Women's Leadership Association.Worldwide Branding has added Ms. Cotton to their distinguished Registry of Executives, Professionals and Entrepreneurs. While inclusion in Worldwide Branding is an honor, only small selections of members in each discipline are endorsed and promoted as leaders in their professional fields.About Worldwide BrandingFor more than 15 years, Worldwide Branding has been the leading, one-stop-shop, personal branding company, in the United States and abroad. From writing professional biographies and press releases, to creating and driving Internet traffic to personal websites, our team of branding experts tailor each product specifically for our clients' needs. From health care to finance to education and law, our constituents represent every major industry and occupation, at all career levels.For more information, please visit http://www.worldwidebranding.com


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.sciencemag.org

This is an update to our ongoing coverage of the political purge of academia underway in Turkey in the wake of a failed coup attempt in July. In a surprise decree issued this past weekend, Turkey's government announced the firing of more than 1000 academics at public universities. Many of those fired are learning of their fate by finding themselves on a long list of names that the government released. The government also announced that it will now directly appoint the leaders of Turkey's universities. Insiders say that the government has long held de facto control over the election of university rectors, but that the new decree simply makes the government's control of academic leadership official. Turkey's Science Academy issued a statement in Turkish this week. "Allowing a central authority ... to decide on how every institution—especially universities where specialization is at the highest level—should conduct its affairs means to entrust the entire country to the supposed infallibility of a single individual in a world where economy and technology advance at an immense pace," it reads. "This goes against democracy and rationality."


News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Electrical and computer engineering professor recognized by the IEEE for outstanding achievement; Erkip's groundbreaking work is helping pave the way for 5G wireless communications BROOKLYN, New York - Elza Erkip, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, will be the 2016 recipient of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Women in Communications Engineering (WICE) Award for her outstanding technical work in communications engineering and for bringing a high degree of visibility to the field. The award will be presented on December 4, 2016, at the Third Women's Workshop on Communications and Signal Processing, held in conjunction with IEEE GLOBECOM, a flagship conference of the IEEE Communications Society (ComSoc) and the world's largest annual gathering of communications engineering professionals from academia, industry, and government. Erkip, a fellow of the IEEE, has received many other honors from the group, and she was recently elected second vice president of the IEEE Information Theory Society; she is scheduled to ascend to the presidency in 2018. She received the IEEE Communications Society Stephen O. Rice Paper Prize in 2004, the IEEE International Conference on Communications' Communication Theory Symposium Best Paper Award in 2007, and the IEEE Communications Society Award for Advances in Communication in 2013. She was a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Information Theory Society from 2013 to 2014 and has held numerous editorship and organizational roles in IEEE publications and conferences over the course of her career. Additionally, Erkip has been elected to the Science Academy Society of Turkey and was among the Thomson Reuters 2014 and 2015 Editions of Highly Cited Researchers. Early in her career, she was selected by the National Science Foundation as one of the country's promising young researchers receiving its CAREER Award. "It's an incredible honor to be given the WICE Award," Erkip said. "I am proud to be a member of IEEE Communications Society and to be of service to its Women in Communications Engineering Committee. To be recognized by my fellow engineers and researchers by this prestigious award is very gratifying." As a faculty member of the research center NYU WIRELESS, Erkip has conducted work that has made significant advances in communications technology. She is one of the pioneers of cooperative networking, and more recently she has been working on 5G wireless systems. "Professor Erkip is an enormous credit to the school - and not only because of the honors she continually accrues," Dean of Engineering Katepalli R. Sreenivasan said. "Her active involvement in the IEEE proves her devotion to the scientific community, and her tireless work to ensure the widespread availability of wireless service proves her commitment to placing technology in service to society. Those are the ideals that we hold in high esteem here at NYU Tandon, and Professor Erkip perfectly embodies them." About the NYU Tandon School of Engineering The NYU Tandon School of Engineering dates to 1854, when the New York University School of Civil Engineering and Architecture as well as the Brooklyn Collegiate and Polytechnic Institute (widely known as Brooklyn Poly) were founded. Their successor institutions merged in January 2014 to create a comprehensive school of education and research in engineering and applied sciences, rooted in a tradition of invention, and entrepreneurship and dedicated to furthering technology in service to society. In addition to its main location in Brooklyn, NYU Tandon collaborates with other schools within the country's largest private research university and is closely connected to engineering programs in NYU Abu Dhabi and NYU Shanghai. It operates business incubators in downtown Manhattan and Brooklyn and an award-winning online graduate program. For more information, visit http://engineering. .


News Article | March 23, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

When he labelled outspoken academics as terrorists, Turkey’s increasingly authoritarian President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan was probably not thinking of Voltaire’s eighteenth-century philosophical maxim: “To hold a pen is to be at war”. Erdoğan sent shivers down the spines of those who care about human rights by declaring on 14 March that those who support terrorists are as guilty as those “who pull the trigger”, and that Turkish law should be changed to reflect this. “The fact that an individual is a deputy, an academic, an author, a journalist or the director of an NGO does not change the fact that that person is a terrorist,” he said. One the same day, three academics from universities in Istanbul were hauled into police custody and then refused bail while prosecutors considered charges of making propaganda for a terrorist organization. Their crime? In January, they had signed a petition that called for an end to violence in the southeast of the country, where government forces have been fighting Kurdish separatists. The petition was signed by 1,128 academics, mostly from Turkish universities, when it was publicly launched on 11 January. It immediately sparked Erdoğan’s rage. Many politically appointed university rectors leapt into line, launching disciplinary investigations into members of their staff who had signed — more than 500 so far. Dozens of signatories were brought in for police questioning. The harsh response attracted a shocked solidarity. Another 1,000 people signed the petition, including a large number of Western scientists, before it was closed on 20 January. An atmosphere of uncertainty and fear prevails. None of the signatories knows whether they, too, will be arrested, and several have had death threats. Some have actively sought sabbaticals abroad; those working outside the country are afraid to return even to visit family. Meanwhile, Turkey is playing a major part on the world political stage, in a role that is overshadowing the fate of the academics. Turkey is a geopolitical fulcrum. On one side it borders war-torn Middle East, on the other, strife-ridden Europe that is struggling to cope with the refugee crisis. When the country reached a historic agreement with the European Union last week to take back migrants who were crossing into Europe illegally, many in the EU complained bitterly about making a deal with Erdoğan because of his worrying human-rights record. Terrorist attacks in Turkey are intensifying, some carried out by Kurdish separatists, others by the Islamist group ISIS. Erdoğan’s controversial announcement followed on the heels of a deadly attack in Ankara, and on 19 March, a suicide bomber killed four in Istanbul. Kurdish separatist terrorism had abated during a two-year ceasefire, but that broke down last July. Erdoğan argues that the peace petition, by focusing only on government military attacks on Kurdish militants, which have killed many innocent civilians, and ignoring terrorist attacks and other serious human-rights abuses carried out by the separatists, actively supports terrorism. While appreciating the urgency of a call to peace, many scientists and academics themselves have reservations about the petition, seeing it as unhelpfully confrontational and even intellectually dishonest. But many have still bravely spoken up for the freedom of expression of the signatories. Turkey’s recently formed Science Academy published a strongly supportive statement in January. “The right to express one’s opinions — even if these might be annoying or minority views — is an essential freedom of every citizen and every academic,” it said. The academy should know — it was created by those who resigned en masse from the Turkish Academy of Sciences when Erdoğan took it over by decree in 2011. Scientists everywhere should use their pens and send their support.


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: phys.org

But for a girl who has adapted to living a life with a left arm that ends just past her elbow, there's no instruction manual for how to incorporate this new technology into her day. That will be up to her to figure out. And researchers at the biomaterials laboratory will be studying her, trying to figure it out, too. Delanie Gallagher of Spanish Lake is the first of 10 children researchers plan to enroll in a study trying to determine how to develop a prosthetic that is useful for children born with all or part of a limb missing, or who lose a limb through trauma or surgery. Most end up living without a prosthetic because it lacks function and only gets in the way. Of the more than 540,000 Americans living with upper limb amputations, only about 20 percent use a prosthetic. Delanie's new arm incorporates myoelectric technology - sensors that detect when muscles in the stump contract and signal parts in the prosthetic to move. Prosthetics with this technology typically cost from $25,000 to $50,000, making them unfeasible for fast-growing children. The WashU lab created a hard plastic arm using a 3-D printer at a cost of just a few hundred dollars. The myoelectric technology was kept simple enough to keep the prosthetic low-cost and lightweight, with one sensor that signals the hand to either open or close, or the wrist to turn. Nick Thompson, a scientist in the lab, hopes the simple route will make arm prostheses more accessible and useful to children. "Tons of people are doing this now, but they are reaching for the fruit high in the tree, trying to develop something with the most functionality that is the closest you can get to your biological limb," Thompson said. "We are going the opposite. We are looking for something quick that can be made and modified quickly. That is our goal." But the big question is how useful it will be. Delanie is proof of how children overcome. She had difficulty thinking of something that she can't already do. What does she hope her new prosthetic will help her do? "I don't know," Delanie said. "I don't know what I can do." Delanie's mom, Janet Gallagher, remembered when Delanie was a baby and got her first prosthetic to help her crawl. "She just dragged it along," Gallagher said. It was quickly tossed aside. Delanie has had two other prostheses, used only to help her steady and steer her bike, hold up a fishing pole or brace her bow and arrow. "It didn't help her," Gallagher said. "She could do better without it." Using her stump, Delanie figured out how to color, use scissors, tie her shoes, braid her hair, put her hair in a ponytail and play the piano. On a recent day at school at the Gateway Science Academy in south St. Louis, she needed no help. She carried her books in a shoulder bag rather than a backpack. She held a pencil sharpener in the crook of her elbow as she turned her pencil. She played with a piece of clay, molding it into a flower between her stump and hand. She twirled her hair with her stump, raised it high when the teacher sought answers from the class. At lunch, Delanie ripped open bags with her teeth and braced her Capri Sun against her body so she could stab it with a straw. When the English teacher read a book aloud, no one batted an eye at a quote by a character who lost part of her leg from a land mine: "Every day, I wished I had it back." Delanie's fifth-grade classmates say they are excited about her new robotic arm, but they are used to how she is. "It's going to be cool, but she does so much without it," her best friend, Georgia Collier, said. "It's going to be different." Gallagher said Delanie sometimes worries about her future. She wonders how she will drive a car, if she will be able to take care of children. As she enters her preteen years, she's figuring out new things like how to hold a blow dryer, put on makeup and curl her hair. Delanie definitely likes how the new arm looks. She asked that it be pink, engraved with her initials. She named it Rosy Pink Petunia Gallagher. Dr. Charles Goldfarb, a WashU orthopedic surgeon at St. Louis Children's Hospital who cares for children with amputated limbs, said a prosthetic can have social benefits. "Can we help her do more things a little similar to her peers?" Goldfarb said. That may become more important as she gets older. "A teenager wants to be like any other teenager," he said. The Minimally Invasive Surgery Biomaterials Lab opened on the medical campus just over three years ago. Its focus was using a 3-D printer to create and test bioabsorbable surgical mesh. In 2014, the lab learned of three engineering students whose senior project involved using a 3-D printer to create a prosthetic for 13-year-old Sydney Kendall who had lost her arm six years earlier in a boating accident. That sparked the start of the lab's work with prosthetic arms. "We asked, 'Can we take this up and improve what the students have worked on?'" Thompson said. A wire in the arm the students created for Sydney was connected to a sensor in her shoulder. Shrugging her shoulder caused the hand to open or close. The wire was cumbersome, she told the scientists, and difficult to use. So, the lab printed a prosthetic with a myoelectric sensor inside its socket that could move the hand and wrist and gave it to Sydney. She found it needed a stronger grip and was heavy. They refined it again, printing her another last spring. The process offered promise. "It justified to do this type of study on pediatric patients," Thompson said. "That's where we are now." Scientists hope a study of more children will give them feedback on how to overcome what they refer to as "Sydney Syndrome" - the prosthetic sitting in a drawer collecting dust. Participants will complete questionnaires three months, six months and a year after getting their prostheses. "Now we feel we have a design that is of high enough utility to try on multiple patients to see if there's any benefit from using them," Thompson said. "The patients will tell us what directions we need to go in to make it better." The study is funded by a $10,000 grant from the St. Louis Children's Hospital Foundation. Low-cost 3-D printing makes it feasible. A 3-D printer works like a regular ink printer, but instead of ink, it prints layers of heated plastic to create models designed with a computer program. The technology dates to the 1980s and was used in manufacturing to make machine parts. In the 2000s, consumers began buying home printers to make jewelry or toys. In the past several years, surgeons have created models of organs and tumors to plan for surgeries. And researchers are experimenting with using materials to print heart valves, stents and skull fragments. The science is advancing rapidly. "The concept of 3-D printing has flipped the prosthetic world over," Goldfarb said, not just in terms of the possibilities, but also in its purpose. "For forever, our goal with a prosthetic has been to make something unobtrusive and unnoticeable with the same skin tone. But it doesn't do much," Goldfarb said. "These prostheses look nothing like your arm. They look like superhero arms. They are bold and distinctive looking. "The difference philosophically is we're making arms that say, 'Hey, look at me. I've got a great, cool arm; and I'm not trying to hide it. It's part of who I am.' ... It's a different concept, and it's helpful for a lot of kids." Back in the lab, as technicians tested the myolectric sensor in Delanie's new arm, the sensor wasn't consistently picking up the signal to move the wrist. After more than an hour of trying to find the problem, they determined Delanie will have to figure out how to best position the arm so the sensor picks up the signal from her muscle. "That's the learning curve for her. No one can do it except her," Thompson said. "As she wears it more and more, she'll figure out how it feels when it's in the best spot." Delanie's dad, Joe Gallagher, joked she's not allowed to hold eggs with it yet. "If she gets to move it three times out of 10, that's a good thing," her father said. "It's a learning process." While the family is wondering how the robotic arm might help Delanie with what she can already do, they don't have expectations that the science will be life-changing - at least for her. But with Delanie's help, scientists could someday develop a useful prosthetic for a child who suddenly loses an arm. Or one that a child with a congenital defect could use as a toddler. Delanie is excited, her parents said, mostly about helping other kids. "She says, 'I'm helping make an arm for people who lose it or for people who are born like me,'" her mom said. "She's looking at it as, 'I'm making history, and helping makes lives better.'"


In memorium: Ralph J. Cicerone, former US Science Academy president and outspoken advocate for science Ralph J. Cicerone, who served as president of the US National Academy of Sciences (NAS) from 1 July 2005 through June of this year, died 5 November at his home in New Jersey. He was 73. Cicerone was a world-renowned atmospheric scientist whose research placed him at the forefront in shaping science and environmental policy, both nationally and internationally. His accomplishments include the restoration and renovation of the historic NAS building on the National Mall, the creation of a $500 million Gulf Research Program following the Deepwater Horizon disaster, two visits to NAS by President Barak Obama, and a number of influential studies that helped to define the causes, extent, and effects of global climate change. Ralph Cicerone (left) shaking hands with President Barack Obama. White House science adviser John Holdren is pictured in the center in this photo taken on 27 April 2009 during the president's visit to the National Academy of Sciences to address its annual meeting. Credit: White House photo In 2001, he led a key NAS study about climate change requested by President George W. Bush. Ten years later, under Cicerone's leadership, a comprehensive set of reports titled America's Climate Choices were issued, calling for action on reducing greenhouse gas emissions while identifying strategies to help the nation and world adapt to a changing climate. Under Cicerone's guidance, the NAS and the Royal Society -- the science academy of the UK -- teamed up in 2014 to produce Climate Change: Evidence and Causes, a clearly written publication for policymakers, educators, and members of the general public. "The entire scientific community is mourning the sudden and untimely loss of this great leader who has been unexpectedly removed from the forefront of the scientific issues that matter most to the future well-being of society," said Marcia McNutt, Cicerone's successor as president of the NAS. "Ralph Cicerone was a model for all of us of not only doing what counts, but doing it with honesty, integrity, and deep passion."


In memorium: Ralph J. Cicerone, former US Science Academy president and outspoken advocate for science Ralph J. Cicerone, who served as president of the US National Academy of Sciences (NAS) from 1 July 2005 through June of this year, died 5 November at his home in New Jersey. He was 73. Cicerone was a world-renowned atmospheric scientist whose research placed him at the forefront in shaping science and environmental policy, both nationally and internationally. His accomplishments include the restoration and renovation of the historic NAS building on the National Mall, the creation of a $500 million Gulf Research Program following the Deepwater Horizon disaster, two visits to NAS by President Barak Obama, and a number of influential studies that helped to define the causes, extent, and effects of global climate change. Ralph Cicerone (left) shaking hands with President Barack Obama. White House science adviser John Holdren is pictured in the center in this photo taken on 27 April 2009 during the president's visit to the National Academy of Sciences to address its annual meeting. Credit: White House photo In 2001, he led a key NAS study about climate change requested by President George W. Bush. Ten years later, under Cicerone's leadership, a comprehensive set of reports titled America's Climate Choices were issued, calling for action on reducing greenhouse gas emissions while identifying strategies to help the nation and world adapt to a changing climate. Under Cicerone's guidance, the NAS and the Royal Society -- the science academy of the UK -- teamed up in 2014 to produce Climate Change: Evidence and Causes, a clearly written publication for policymakers, educators, and members of the general public. "The entire scientific community is mourning the sudden and untimely loss of this great leader who has been unexpectedly removed from the forefront of the scientific issues that matter most to the future well-being of society," said Marcia McNutt, Cicerone's successor as president of the NAS. "Ralph Cicerone was a model for all of us of not only doing what counts, but doing it with honesty, integrity, and deep passion."

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