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Campbell J.H.,Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | Hayden J.S.,Schott North America Inc. | Marker A.,Schott North America Inc.
International Journal of Applied Glass Science | Year: 2011

Advances in laser glass compositions and manufacturing have enabled a new class of high-energy/high-power (HEHP), petawatt (PW), and high average power (HAP) laser systems that are being used for fusion energy ignition demonstration, fundamental physics research, and materials processing, respectively. The requirements for these three laser systems are different, necessitating different glasses or groups of glasses. The manufacturing technology is now mature for melting, annealing, fabricating, and finishing of laser glasses for all three applications. The laser glass properties of major importance for HEHP, PW, and HAP applications are briefly reviewed and the compositions and properties of the most widely used commercial laser glasses are summarized. Proposed advances in these three laser systems will require new glasses and new melting methods, which are briefly discussed. The challenges presented by these laser systems will likely dominate the field of laser glass development over the next several decades. © 2011 The American Ceramic Society and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


George S.,SCHOTT North America Inc
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2016

Phosphate glasses are known to produce high gain for the Er3+ emission into 1540nm, especially when sensitized with Yb. Unfortunately, the phosphate glass matrix tends to be weaker than other available amorphous materials. Unlike crystalline materials, glass chemical structure around the active ion can be optimized for both material strength and laser output. Reported here is the result from a design of experiment that was completed in order to strengthen the glass structure of a commercially available phosphate laser glass without impacting its laser output efficiencies. Laser output performance results for the glass that met the targeted thermal and mechanical limits are presented. This effort concludes with a scalable material that is ultimately released to the commercial market. © 2016 SPIE.


George S.,SCHOTT North America Inc. | Vullo P.,SCHOTT North America Inc.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2015

Phosphate glasses are known to produce high gain for the Er3+ emission into 1540nm, especially when sensitized with Yb. Unfortunately, the phosphate glass matrix tends to be weaker than other available amorphous materials. Being that glasses are engineerable, a study was initiated in order to strengthen the glass structure of a commercially available phosphate laser glass without impacting its laser output efficiencies. Secondly, we seek to understand the impact of the various glass modifiers that drive thermal shock resistance of phosphate glasses on the Er emission manifolds. This report details a number of compositions that were designed, melted and analyzed for properties. Laser output performance results for the glasses that met the targeted parameters are presented. © 2015 SPIE.


Davis M.J.,SCHOTT North America Inc. | Hayden J.S.,SCHOTT North America Inc.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2011

Laser performance measurements (quasi-CW) were made of various Nd-doped SCHOTT catalog laser glasses: LG-680, LG-750, LG-760, LG-770, APG-1, and APG-2; all but the first, a silicate, are phosphate glasses. Nominal Nd 3+ doping was approximately 3 × 10 20 ions/cm 3. An end-pumped, laser diode geometry was used and input powers, pump pulse length, and pump rep-rates were kept low to avoid thermal lensing (4 W, 1 msec, and 0.1 Hz, respectively). As expected, the phosphate glasses performed better than the silicate glass. Slope efficiencies ranged from 25% for LG-680 up to nearly 33% for LG-760. APG-1, designed for high rep-rate, high-power systems, performed nearly the same in this particular configuration as glasses designed for high-energy applications (e.g., LG-770). © 2011 SPIE.


George S.A.,SCHOTT North America Inc. | Hayden J.S.,SCHOTT North America Inc.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2014

Laser design codes utilize laser properties provided by materials manufacturers for performance modeling. Large scale manufacturing of materials during compositional developments for a particular laser design is not economically feasible. Nevertheless, the laser properties derived from the available sample volumes must be reliable and reproducible. In recent years, as a result of the renewed interest in novel glasses for ultrafast laser applications, SCHOTT has developed improved measurements and methodologies for providing the most accurate information possible to laser scientists. Even though the J-O method is robust and time tested for the spectroscopic characterization of Nd3+, the accuracy of the results requires reliable measurements. This paper outlines the J-O approximation for manifold to manifold transitions, measurements needed, and some of the pitfalls to watch for during the collection of data for Nd-doped materials. © 2014 SPIE.


Hayden J.S.,SCHOTT North America Inc.
International Journal of Applied Glass Science | Year: 2015

The long-term commercial potential for solid-state laser gain materials based on glass has only been possible by constant technological developments that have overcome otherwise "market lethal" performance and cost issues. We will discuss a few examples that resulted in the development of completely new manufacturing processes that expanded the laser glass operation window and made possible the construction of large laser systems such as the National Ignition Facility in the United States and the French Laser Mégajoule. In parallel, through compositional modifications and identification of special postprocessing treatments, new active glasses with tailored properties have been continuously developed for specific laser architectures. We will also discuss current research activity directed at finding customized laser glass compositions for the next generation of high-peak-power (e.g., Exawatt class) laser systems. © 2015 American Ceramic Society and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Disclosed are silica and fluoride doped lead-bismuth-gallium heavy metal oxide glasses for visible to mid-wave Infrared Radiation transmitting optics and preparation thereof.


Patent
Schott North America Inc. | Date: 2012-02-08

Disclosed are the use of phosphate-based glasses as a solid state laser gain medium, in particular, the invention relates to broadening the emission bandwidth of rare earth ions used as lasing ions in a phosphate-based glass composition, where the broadening of the emission bandwidth is believed to be achieved by the hybridization of the glass network.


Patent
Schott North America Inc. | Date: 2012-02-08

The invention relates to aluminoborosilicate-based glasses. Thanks to the high values of Youngs modulus, fracture toughness and hardness, the rare earth aluminoborosilicate glass system according to the invention is suitable as transparent armor window material.


Patent
Schott North America Inc. | Date: 2012-04-04

The invention relates to aluminophosphate-based glasses suitable for use as a solid laser medium, which further contains SiO_(2) and B_(2)O_(3). The laser glasses possess desirable figure of merit values for FOM_(TM) and FOM_(laser), as described herein.

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