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Chicago Ridge, IL, United States

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago is one of America's largest accredited independent schools of art and design. It is located in the Loop in Chicago, Illinois. The school is associated with the museum of the same name, and "The Art Institute of Chicago" or "Chicago Art Institute" often refers to either entity. Providing degrees at the undergraduate and graduate levels, SAIC has been recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top two graduate art programs in the nation, as well as by Columbia University's National Arts Journalism survey as the most influential art school in the United States.SAIC has been accredited since 1936 by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design since 1944 , and by the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design since its founding in 1991. Additionally it is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board.Its downtown Chicago campus consists of seven buildings located in the immediate vicinity of the AIC building. SAIC is in an equal partnership with the AIC and share many administrative resources such as design, construction, and human resources. The campus, located in the Loop, comprises chiefly three buildings: the Michigan , the Sharp , and the Columbus . SAIC also owns additional buildings throughout Chicago that are used as student galleries or investments. Wikipedia.


Yang A.,School of the Art Institute of Chicago
American Biology Teacher | Year: 2010

Fostering science literacy by engaging students as active participants and communicators of scientific ideas can enhance learning as well as a sense of personal investment. Science "zine" projects can be an effective way to structure this kind of participatory science literacy and flexibly build on specific course content as well as skills in the research, conceptualization, and communication of scientific ideas. When students are engaged as media producers and educators, their role and responsibility in the "ecology of scientific information" becomes more apparent and potentially more rewarding.


Casadio F.,School of the Art Institute of Chicago | Rose V.,Argonne National Laboratory
Applied Physics A: Materials Science and Processing | Year: 2013

Here for the first time we describe the use of high resolution nanoprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping for the analysis of artists' paints, hierarchically complex materials typically composed of binder, pigments, fillers, and other additives. The work undertaken at the nanoprobe sought to obtain highly spatially resolved, highly sensitive mapping of metal impurities (Pb, Cd, Fe, and other metals) in submicron particles of zinc oxide pigments used in early 20th century artists' tube paints and enamel paints, with particular emphasis on Ripolin, a popular brand of French house paint used extensively by Pablo Picasso and some of his contemporaries. Analysis revealed that the Zn oxide particles only contain a little Fe, proving that the highest quality Zn oxide pigment, free of Pb and Cd, was used for Ripolin house paints as well as artists' paints. Nanoprobe XRF mapping also demonstrated that artists' tube paints generally have more abundant fillers and additional whites (based on Pb, Ti, Ca) than Ripolin paints, which contain mostly pure zinc oxide. The chemical characterization of paints at the nanoscale opens the path to a better understanding of their fabrication and chemical reactivity. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: NMP-21-2014 | Award Amount: 9.18M | Year: 2015

Currently there is a lack of methodologies for the conservation of modern and contemporary artworks, many of which will not be accessible in very short time due to extremely fast degradation processes. The challenge of NANORESTART (NANOmaterials for the REStoration of works of ART) will be to address this issue within a new framework with respect to the state of the art of conservation science. NANORESTART is devoted to the development of nanomaterials to ensure long term protection and security of modern/contemporary cultural heritage, taking into account environmental and human risks, feasibility and materials costs. The market for conservation of this heritage is estimated at some 5 billion per year, and could increase by a significant factor in the next years due to the wider use of nanomaterials. The new tools and materials developed will represent a breakthrough in cultural heritage and conservation science and will focus on: (i) tools for controlled cleaning, such as highly-retentive gels for the confinement of enzymes and nanostructured fluids based on green surfactants; (ii) the strengthening and protection of surfaces by using nanocontainers, nanoparticles and supramolecular systems/assemblies; (iii) nanostructured substrates and sensors for enhanced molecules detection; (iv) evaluation of the environmental impact and the development of security measures for long lasting conservation of cultural heritage. Within the project the industrial scalability of the developed materials will be demonstrated. NANORESTART gathers centres of excellence in the field of synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials, world leading chemical Industries and SMEs operating in R&D, and International and European centres for conservation, education and museums. Such centres will assess the new materials on modern/contemporary artefacts in urgent need of conservation, and disseminate the knowledge and the new nanomaterials among conservators on a worldwide perspective.


News Article | August 30, 2016
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

This week in Chicago, the Array of Things team begins the first phase of the groundbreaking urban sensing project, installing the first of an eventual 500 nodes on city streets. By measuring data on air quality, climate, traffic and other urban features, these pilot nodes kick off an innovative partnership between the University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory and the City of Chicago to better understand, serve and improve cities. Array of Things is designed as a "fitness tracker" for the city, collecting new streams of data on Chicago's environment, infrastructure and activity. This hyper-local open data can help researchers, city officials and software developers study and address critical city challenges, such as preventing urban flooding, improving traffic safety and air quality and assessing the nature and impact of climate change. In the first phase of the project, 50 nodes will be installed in August and September on traffic light poles in The Loop, Pilsen, Logan Square and along Lake Michigan. These nodes will contain sensors for measuring air and surface temperature, barometric pressure, light, vibration, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, ozone and ambient sound intensity. Two cameras will collect data on vehicle and foot traffic, standing water, sky color and cloud cover. The first two nodes were installed last week at the intersections of Damen and Archer Avenues and Damen Avenue and Cermak Road, where they will collect information on weather, traffic and air quality. A total of 500 nodes will be installed across Chicago by the end of 2018, and additional nodes will be shared with cities across the United States and in countries such as England, Mexico, and Taiwan. "The University of Chicago has a long and flourishing tradition of scholarship that engages with urban life and makes a positive impact," said Robert J. Zimmer, president of the University. "The Array of Things project advances these ideals by gathering a broad scope of data about the urban environment, in a form that researchers, policymakers and residents can use to develop innovative ways of improving our city and urban areas around the world." "The Array of Things project is just one example of the advancements that are possible when the city, university and Argonne combine their diverse and complementary perspectives, experience and expertise," said Argonne Director Peter B. Littlewood. "I'm excited to see the Array of Things fulfill its potential to help make Chicago cleaner, healthier and more livable, and I also look forward to future game-changing collaborations with our local partners." Initial node locations and data applications were determined based on interactions with community organizations and research groups. Eight nodes in Pilsen will contain sensors for tracking air quality and its relationship with asthma and other diseases. Partnerships with the Chicago Loop Alliance and Vision Zero motivated studies of pedestrian and vehicle flow and traffic safety in The Loop neighborhood. And scientists at UChicago and Argonne chose locations along the lake and across the middle of Chicago that will allow for optimal measurements of features related to urban weather and climate change. "The Array of Things is a community technology," said Charlie Catlett, director of the Urban Center and Computation and Data at the University of Chicago and Argonne and the lead investigator of Array of Things. "It's about creating new streams of data that help us understand and address the most critical urban challenges. Where we see an intersection of resident concerns, science interests and policymaker interest, that's where we see opportunity for Array of Things deployment in Chicago." Array of Things will also support City of Chicago efforts to provide smarter and proactive services using predictive analytics and data-driven policy. For example, by tracking the weather conditions leading up to flooding at intersections, city crews can respond more quickly to floods or make infrastructural changes that prevent standing water from accumulating. City departments could also use data on heavy truck traffic and air quality to make decisions about commercial routing that preserves clean air and safe roads in residential neighborhoods. "It's truly doing science in the city and out in the communities. We'll be able to engage with community groups to help them make the data their own and figure out to use it to address the questions they have," said Brenna Berman, Chief Information Officer of the City of Chicago. "You're going to see community groups use this data to understand their communities and neighborhoods better as we all try to build a better life here in Chicago." Data collected by Array of Things nodes will be open, free and available to the public, researchers and developers. After a brief period of testing and calibration, the project will publish data through the City of Chicago Data Portal, open data platform Plenar.io, and via application programming interfaces. As specified by the Array of Things privacy and governance policies, no personally identifiable information will be stored or released by sensor nodes. Array of Things is funded by a $3.1 million grant from the National Science Foundation, with additional investments from Argonne and the Chicago Innovation Exchange. "We at the National Science Foundation are proud to support the Array of Things," said Jim Kurose, head of Computer and Information Science and Engineering at NSF. "The launch of the first nodes will provide important information and data-driven insights about the health of cities and residents, and illustrate how fundamental research is vital to the transformation of our local communities envisioned by the National Smart Cities Initiative." The underlying software and hardware uses the Waggle sensor platforming, designed by Pete Beckman, Rajesh Sankaran and Catlett at Argonne. The node enclosures were designed and manufactured by Product Development Technologies in Lake Zurich, Ill., from original designs by Douglas Pancoast and Satya Mark Basu of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. AT&T is the project's communications partner, providing all AoT connectivity for Chicago. Array of Things technology was developed with help from industry partners who provided in-kind engineering expertise, including Cisco, Intel, Microsoft, Motorola Solutions, Schneider Electric and Zebra Technologies.


Casadio F.,School of the Art Institute of Chicago | Leona M.,Metropolitan Museum of Art | Lombardi J.R.,City University of New York | Van Duyne R.,Northwestern University
Accounts of Chemical Research | Year: 2010

Organic dyes extracted from plants, insects, and shellfish have been used for millennia in dyeing textiles and manufacturing colorants for painting. The economic push for dyes with high tinting strength, directly related to high extinction coefficients in the visible range, historically led to the selection of substances that could be used at low concentrations. But a desirable property for the colorist is a major problem for the analytical chemist; the identification of dyes in cultural heritage objects is extremely difficult. Techniques routinely used in the identification of inorganic pigments are generally not applicable to dyes: X-ray fluorescence because of the lack of an elemental signature, Raman spectroscopy because of the generally intense luminescence of dyes, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy because of the interference of binders and extenders. Traditionally, the identification of dyes has required relatively large samples (0.5-5 mm in diameter) for analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. In this Account, we describe our efforts to develop practical approaches in identifying dyes in works of art from samples as small as 25 μm in diameter with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In SERS, the Raman scattering signal is greatly enhanced when organic molecules with large delocalized electron systems are adsorbed on atomically rough metallic substrates; fluorescence is concomitantly quenched. Recent nanotechnological advances in preparing and manipulating metallic particles have afforded staggering enhancement factors of up to 1014. SERS is thus an ideal technique for the analysis of dyes. Indeed, rhodamine 6G and crystal violet, two organic compounds used to demonstrate the sensitivity of SERS at the single-molecule level, were first synthesized as textile dyes in the second half of the 19th century. In this Account, we examine the practical application of SERS to cultural heritage studies, including the selection of appropriate substrates, the development of analytical protocols, and the building of SERS spectral databases. We also consider theoretical studies on dyes of artistic interest. Using SERS, we have successfully documented the earliest use of a madder lake pigment and the earliest occurrence of lac dye in European art. We have also found several examples of kermes and cochineal glazes, as well as madder, cochineal, methyl violet, and eosin lakes, from eras ranging from ancient Egypt to the 19th century. The ability to rapidly analyze very small samples with SERS makes it a particularly valuable tool in a museum context. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

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