Schomer and Associates

Champaign, IL, United States

Schomer and Associates

Champaign, IL, United States
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Schomer P.,Schomer and Associates | Freytag J.,Freytag and Associates LLC | Machesky A.,Schomer and Associates | Luo C.,Schomer and Associates | And 3 more authors.
Noise Control Engineering Journal | Year: 2011

This paper focuses on a re-analysis and updating of the 1974 report by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency entitled: Population Distribution of the United Sates as a Function of Outdoor Noise Level, and commonly known as the 100-site survey. New data, about half of which were gathered throughout the country during 2008 and 2009 and about half of which were gathered in the Baltimore area in about 1998, are presented in this paper, where these different data sets are compared one to one another, and where the total combined data set in terms of the day-night sound level (abbreviated DNL and symbolized L dn) is examined as a function of population density. The main conclusions are that the original function in the EPA report yields results that are 3 dB higher than results obtained in a free-field situation, primarily because the measurements in that study used a microphone supported on a pole and at a distance of 1.8 m (6 ft) from the façade of the building. The new data confirm that the EPA predictions are 3 dB higher than those obtained for a free-field situation. A second main conclusion is that there is neither indication of any significant increase in overall ambient community noise exposure over the past 35 years, nor is there indication of any significant decrease in overall ambient community noise exposure despite 35 years of technological noise control improvements on transportation and other noise sources. © 2011 Institute of Noise Control Engineering.


Bray W.R.,HEAD Acoustics Inc. | Schomer P.D.,Schomer and Associates | Thompson J.K.,JKT Enterprises
41st International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering 2012, INTER-NOISE 2012 | Year: 2012

The recent process of updating the stationary loudness standard ISO 532-1975 has revealed important issues. It is hoped that this publication can help increase understanding and participation of users with others involved in standards. Issues which have come into focus include: a) Lack of awareness in much of the industrial use community about standards status and activity - What mechanisms could exist for industrial users of standards to be aware of and participate actively in standards development? b) How to achieve balanced multidirectional participation and information flow: full, open communications and discussion from all perspectives with all interested parties at the table? c) How can industrial users influence managements to participate directly in the standards process (including operational imperatives such as paying to participate)? d) How can awareness be improved in and between the standards offices of different professional organizations about standards important to members, which may be undergoing a change? The authors have recognized these issues in their individual areas of work through the current ISO 532 situation, and join in a positive effort to provide perspectives and recommendations potentially of value to all concerned in the development and use not only of psychoacoustic standards, but of standards in general.


Bray W.R.,Acoustics Inc. | Schomer P.D.,Schomer and Associates | Thompson J.K.,JKT Enterprises
Sound and Vibration | Year: 2013

This article is intended to help increase understanding and participation of users with others involved in acoustics standards. Issues that have come into focus include: a) Lack of awareness in much of the industrial community about standards status and activity and what mechanisms could exist for industrial users of standards to be aware of and participate actively in standards development; b) How to achieve balanced multi-directional participation and information fow via full, open communications and discussion from all perspectives with all interested parties at the table; c) How industrial users can infuence management to participate directly in the standards process (including operational imperatives such as paying to participate); and d) How awareness can be improved in and between the standards offices of different professional organizations about important standards that may be undergoing a change?


Schomer P.,Schomer and Associates
Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics | Year: 2013

This paper is geared towards wind turbine sound, but it is really a simple variation on the basic concepts that this author used in the development of loudness-level-weighted sound exposure (Schomer et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am, 110(5), Pt. 1, 2390-2397, 2001) and of Rating Noise Curves (RNC) (Schomer, Noise Cont. Eng. J., 48(3), 85-96, 2000), which are used in the Standard, ANSI/ASA S 12.2 Criteria for evaluating room noise. The fundamental issue is: Can we hear slowly surging or pulsating sounds for which the LEQ spectrum is below the threshold of hearing, where "slowly" means that the pulses come at a rate that is no faster than about 4 pulses per second? The short answer is yes, and the longer answer is that this effect is a function of the spectral content and becomes more-and-more prominent as the spectral content goes lower-and-lower in the audible frequency range. So surging or pulsing sound that is primarily in the 16 or 31 Hz octave bands will show the greatest effect. This paper shows the applicability of these results to wind-turbine sound. © 2013 Acoustical Society of America.

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