Savannah River Remediation Savannah River Site

Aiken, United States

Savannah River Remediation Savannah River Site

Aiken, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Ling L.T.,Savannah River Remediation Savannah River Site | Blanco S.M.,U.S. Department of Energy
15th International High-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference 2015, IHLRWM 2015 | Year: 2015

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy site which has produced nuclear materials for national defense, research, space, and medical programs since the 1950's. As a by-product of this activity, approximately 37 million gallons of high-level liquid waste containing approximately 292 million curies of radioactivity is stored on an interim basis in 43 underground storage tanks. Originally, 51 tanks were constructed and utilized to support the mission. Six tanks have been operationally closed and taken out of service and two are currently undergoing the closure process. The Liquid Waste System is a highly integrated operation involving safely storing liquid waste in underground storage tanks; removing, treating, and dispositioning the low-level waste fraction in concrete; vitrifying the higher activity waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility; and storing the vitrified waste in stainless steel canisters until permanent disposition. After waste removal and processing, the storage and processing facilities are cleaned and closed. A Liquid Waste System Plan was developed to integrate and document the activities required to disposition legacy and future High-Level Waste and to remove from service radioactive liquid waste tanks and facilities. It establishes and records a planning basis for waste processing in the liquid waste system through the end of the program mission. The integrated Plan which recognizes the challenges of constrained funding provides a path forward to complete the liquid waste mission within all regulatory and legal requirements. The overarching objective of the Plan is to meet all Federal Facility Agreement and Site Treatment Plan regulatory commitments on or ahead of schedule while preserving as much lifecycle acceleration as possible through incorporation of numerous cost savings initiatives, elimination of non-essential scope, and deferral of other scope not on the critical path to compliance. There is currently a premium on processing and storage space in the radioactive liquid waste tank system. To enable continuation of risk reduction initiatives, the Plan establishes a processing strategy that provides tank space required to meet, or minimizes the impacts to meeting, programmatic objectives. The Plan also addresses perturbations in funding and schedule impacts.


Ling L.T.,Savannah River Remediation Savannah River Site | MacVean S.,Savannah River Remediation Savannah River Site | Folk J.,U.S. Department of Energy
15th International High-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference 2015, IHLRWM 2015 | Year: 2015

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) site located on 300-square miles in South Carolina. Since it became operational in 1951, the site has produced nuclear material for national defense, research, medical, and space programs. The separation of fissionable nuclear material from irradiated targets and fuels resulted in the generation of over 150 million gallons of radioactive waste. Originally, 51 tanks were constructed and utilized to support the mission. Six tanks have been operationally closed and taken out of service and two are currently undergoing the closure process. Most of the tank waste is a complex mixture of chemical and radioactive waste generated during the separation of special nuclear materials and enriched uranium from irradiated targets and spent fuel using the Plutonium Uranium Reduction Extraction (PUREX) process in the F-Canyon separation facility and the modified PUREX process in the H-Canyon separation facility (HM process). Waste generated from the recovery of Pu-238 in H-Canyon for the production of heat sources for space missions is also included. The waste was converted to an alkaline solution; metal oxides settled as sludge (iron, aluminum, uranium, manganese, nickel, and mercury), and supernate evaporated to form saltcake. The Liquid Waste System is a highly integrated operation involving safely storing liquid waste in underground storage tanks; removing, treating, and dispositioning the low-level waste fraction in concrete; vitrifying the higher activity waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF); and storing the vitrified waste in stainless steel canisters until permanent disposition. Continued long-term storage of these radioactive wastes poses a potential environmental risk. Therefore, since 1996, DOE and its contractors have been removing waste from tanks, pre-treating it, vitrifying it, and pouring the vitrified waste into canisters for long-term disposal in a permanent repository. As of December 31, 2014, DWPF had produced 3,917 vitrified waste canisters.

Loading Savannah River Remediation Savannah River Site collaborators
Loading Savannah River Remediation Savannah River Site collaborators