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SMi’s will return to Rome, Italy for the 10th annual Border Security conference on the 15th and 16th February 2017 Rome, Italy, December 14, 2016 --( SMi are thrilled to announce Aéroports de Paris as the latest addition to the 2017 speaker line-up. With the recent affairs and threats that the capital have faced, Aeroports de Paris make an excellent addition to Border Security 2017 as they will provide updates on how security measures are increasing across airports within the city. Emmanuel Berton the Project Manager of Border Controls will be speaking on day two of the conference with his presentation ‘Enhancing Security for Aeroports De Paris' with Automatic Border Control (ABC) Trials’. Emmanuel will discuss managing growing security threats with technological solutions; fulfilling security and customer experience requirements with the implementation of ABC technology as well as effectively coordinating with the government for comprehensive security measures in Paris airports. Other sessions which are not to be missed include addresses from: Austrian Armed Forces, Italian Coast Guard, Swedish National Bureau of Investigation, Finnish Customs, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, SITA, NATO, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, French Customs, Guardia di Finanza, European Maritime Safety Agency, EU ‘PROTECT’ Project, European Union Satellite Center, International Organisation for Migration and many more. Hot Topics for 2017: • Operational case studies • Biometric technology and its implementation • Smart border technology • Surveillance and detection • Threats and border management Running alongside the conference will be a pre-conference workshop entitled ‘Biometrics for Border Management and Security’, which will be led by Max Snijder, CEO of the European Biometrics Group, European Association for Biometrics. This half day workshop will provide a comprehensive overview of the current use of biometrics as a part of border control. The workshop will provide insight into biometrics, recent trends and developments as well as looking ahead at the role of biometrics in the future of identity management. Specific subjects covered will involve Mobile Biometrics, Cyber Biometric and Public vs Private data sources. There is currently a £100 early bird available for those wishing to attend, register at www.bordersec.com/prcom Border Security 2017 is sponsored by SITA and WCC Smart Search & Match. For sponsorship packages contact Sadia Malick on +44 (0) 207 827 6748 or email smalick@smi-online.co.uk. For delegate enquiries contact James Hitchen on +44 (0) 207 827 6054 or email jhitchen@smi-online.co.uk. For media enquiries, contact Zoe Gale on +44 20 7827 6138 or zgale@smi-online.co.uk Border Security 15-16 February 2017 Rome, Italy www.bordersec.com/prcom Contact e-mail: zgale@smi-online.co.uk Contact tel: +44 (0) 207 827 6054 Sponsored by: SITA and WCC Smart Search & Match #BorderSec *(Source) http://bit.ly/2g8cAKU About SMi Group: Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk Rome, Italy, December 14, 2016 --( PR.com )-- "The dramatic events of the past 2 years (Bruxelles, Istanbul, Paris, Nice, Copenhagen, Orlando, Ankara, Thalys, etc.) show us that even if the threat on aviation still remains, it is shifting to landside, to public areas. These public areas might be a public square, a concert hall, a train station or indeed, an airport terminal." *(Source)SMi are thrilled to announce Aéroports de Paris as the latest addition to the 2017 speaker line-up. With the recent affairs and threats that the capital have faced, Aeroports de Paris make an excellent addition to Border Security 2017 as they will provide updates on how security measures are increasing across airports within the city. Emmanuel Berton the Project Manager of Border Controls will be speaking on day two of the conference with his presentation ‘Enhancing Security for Aeroports De Paris' with Automatic Border Control (ABC) Trials’. Emmanuel will discuss managing growing security threats with technological solutions; fulfilling security and customer experience requirements with the implementation of ABC technology as well as effectively coordinating with the government for comprehensive security measures in Paris airports.Other sessions which are not to be missed include addresses from: Austrian Armed Forces, Italian Coast Guard, Swedish National Bureau of Investigation, Finnish Customs, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, SITA, NATO, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, French Customs, Guardia di Finanza, European Maritime Safety Agency, EU ‘PROTECT’ Project, European Union Satellite Center, International Organisation for Migration and many more.Hot Topics for 2017:• Operational case studies• Biometric technology and its implementation• Smart border technology• Surveillance and detection• Threats and border managementRunning alongside the conference will be a pre-conference workshop entitled ‘Biometrics for Border Management and Security’, which will be led by Max Snijder, CEO of the European Biometrics Group, European Association for Biometrics.This half day workshop will provide a comprehensive overview of the current use of biometrics as a part of border control. The workshop will provide insight into biometrics, recent trends and developments as well as looking ahead at the role of biometrics in the future of identity management. Specific subjects covered will involve Mobile Biometrics, Cyber Biometric and Public vs Private data sources.There is currently a £100 early bird available for those wishing to attend, register at www.bordersec.com/prcomBorder Security 2017 is sponsored by SITA and WCC Smart Search & Match.For sponsorship packages contact Sadia Malick on +44 (0) 207 827 6748 or email smalick@smi-online.co.uk.For delegate enquiries contact James Hitchen on +44 (0) 207 827 6054 or email jhitchen@smi-online.co.uk.For media enquiries, contact Zoe Gale on +44 20 7827 6138 or zgale@smi-online.co.ukBorder Security15-16 February 2017Rome, Italywww.bordersec.com/prcomContact e-mail: zgale@smi-online.co.ukContact tel: +44 (0) 207 827 6054Sponsored by: SITA and WCC Smart Search & Match#BorderSec*(Source) http://bit.ly/2g8cAKUAbout SMi Group: Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from SMi Group


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.csmonitor.com

People watch as India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C37) carrying 104 satellites in a single mission lifts off from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, India, on Feb. 15, 2017. —Two years after India became the first Asian nation to send a probe to Mars, the country’s space agency can claim another record: The most satellites launched with a single rocket. At 9:28 a.m. Tuesday morning, a Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) built by the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) lifted off from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre on the Bay of Bengal, carrying 104 satellites from seven countries. By 10 a.m., all had successfully been inserted into orbit, and India had surpassed a bar previously set by a Russian launch of 37 satellites in 2014. “This remarkable feat by @isro is yet another proud moment for our space scientific community and the nation,” the country’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, tweeted. “India salutes our scientists.” In recent years, India has gained a reputation for reliable, inexpensive satellite launches; Tuesday’s launch positions it to gain an even bigger share of this fast-growing market. “India offers launch costs that are fifty percent cheaper than the rest of the world,” Pallava Bagla, a science editor with the privately run Indian TV channel NDTV, told Al Jazeera last June, so if SpaceX, Arianespace or NASA can do it at $100, India is willing to do it at $50.” If anything, that may be an understatement. On Wednesday, Moneycontrol.com’s Sidhartha Shukla reported that launching a satellite through SpaceX could cost around $60 million, but “ISRO charged an average of [$3 million] per satellite between 2013 and 2015.” ISRO’s strong position in the satellite-launch market had an inauspicious start. The first PSLV, launched in 1993, failed because of software glitches. By persevering with the program, ISRO was able to take advantage of the country’s talented, but relatively low-wage, workforce to bring launch costs down. Ramabhadran Aravamudan, former director of the ISRO Satellite Center in Bangalore, attributed India’s low launch prices to “cheaper labor costs and a state-led model that doesn't involve ‘industries with their own profit margins,’ ” CNN reported. This approach runs counter to the United State's current strategy of turning orbital spaceflight over to private firms as a means to bring costs down. But ISRO has nonetheless found plenty of customers, and managed to capitalize on another recent trend: the development of lightweight, inexpensive “CubeSats” and “SmallSats” that can be packed into a single rocket. Tuesday’s launch delivered 103 of these smaller satellites – 88 of which belonged to the San Francisco-based imaging company Planet – into orbit, along with a larger environmental satellite. Last year, private launches like these brought in 230 rupees crore (about $3.4 million) for ISRO’s commercial arm. The experience has also enabled ISRO to set more ambitious goals, on a tight budget. The country’s Mangalyaan Mars Orbiter reached the Red Planet in 2014 at a cost of $75 million – less than the budget for the 2013 Sci-Fi thriller “Gravity.” “They're not at the level of the Big 4,” Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, told The Christian Science Monitor last May, referring to the space programs of the US, Russia, China, and Europe. ”But they’re pretty darn good.”


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.csmonitor.com

People watch as India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C37) carrying 104 satellites in a single mission lifts off from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, India, on Feb. 15, 2017. —Two years after India became the first Asian nation to send a probe to Mars, the country’s space agency can claim another record: The most satellites launched with a single rocket. At 9:28 a.m. Tuesday morning, a Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) built by the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) lifted off from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre on the Bay of Bengal, carrying 104 satellites from seven countries. By 10 a.m., all had successfully been inserted into orbit, and India had surpassed a bar previously set by a Russian launch of 37 satellites in 2014. “This remarkable feat by @isro is yet another proud moment for our space scientific community and the nation,” the country’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, tweeted. “India salutes our scientists.” In recent years, India has gained a reputation for reliable, inexpensive satellite launches; Tuesday’s launch positions it to gain an even bigger share of this fast-growing market. “India offers launch costs that are fifty percent cheaper than the rest of the world,” Pallava Bagla, a science editor with the privately run Indian TV channel NDTV, told Al Jazeera last June, so if SpaceX, Arianespace or NASA can do it at $100, India is willing to do it at $50.” If anything, that may be an understatement. On Wednesday, Moneycontrol.com’s Sidhartha Shukla reported that launching a satellite through SpaceX could cost around $60 million, but “ISRO charged an average of [$3 million] per satellite between 2013 and 2015.” ISRO’s strong position in the satellite-launch market had an inauspicious start. The first PSLV, launched in 1993, failed because of software glitches. By persevering with the program, ISRO was able to take advantage of the country’s talented, but relatively low-wage, workforce to bring launch costs down. Ramabhadran Aravamudan, former director of the ISRO Satellite Center in Bangalore, attributed India’s low launch prices to “cheaper labor costs and a state-led model that doesn't involve ‘industries with their own profit margins,’ ” CNN reported. This approach runs counter to the United State's current strategy of turning orbital spaceflight over to private firms as a means to bring costs down. But ISRO has nonetheless found plenty of customers, and managed to capitalize on another recent trend: the development of lightweight, inexpensive “CubeSats” and “SmallSats” that can be packed into a single rocket. Tuesday’s launch delivered 103 of these smaller satellites – 88 of which belonged to the San Francisco-based imaging company Planet – into orbit, along with a larger environmental satellite. Last year, private launches like these brought in 230 rupees crore (about $34 million) for ISRO’s commercial arm. The experience has also enabled ISRO to set more ambitious goals, on a tight budget. The country’s Mangalyaan Mars Orbiter reached the Red Planet in 2014 at a cost of $75 million – less than the budget for the 2013 Sci-Fi thriller “Gravity.” “They're not at the level of the Big 4,” Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, told The Christian Science Monitor last May, referring to the space programs of the US, Russia, China, and Europe. ”But they’re pretty darn good.” [Editor's note: A previous version of this article misstated the US dollar value of 230 rupees crore. It is $34 million.]


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.csmonitor.com

People watch as India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C37) carrying 104 satellites in a single mission lifts off from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, India, on Feb. 15, 2017. —Two years after India became the first Asian nation to send a probe to Mars, the country’s space agency can claim another record: The most satellites launched with a single rocket. At 9:28 a.m. Tuesday morning, a Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) built by the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) lifted off from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre on the Bay of Bengal, carrying 104 satellites from seven countries. By 10 a.m., all had successfully been inserted into orbit, and India had surpassed a bar previously set by a Russian launch of 37 satellites in 2014. “This remarkable feat by @isro is yet another proud moment for our space scientific community and the nation,” the country’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, tweeted. “India salutes our scientists.” In recent years, India has gained a reputation for reliable, inexpensive satellite launches; Tuesday’s launch positions it to gain an even bigger share of this fast-growing market. “India offers launch costs that are fifty percent cheaper than the rest of the world,” Pallava Bagla, a science editor with the privately run Indian TV channel NDTV, told Al Jazeera last June, so if SpaceX, Arianespace or NASA can do it at $100, India is willing to do it at $50.” If anything, that may be an understatement. On Wednesday, Moneycontrol.com’s Sidhartha Shukla reported that launching a satellite through SpaceX could cost around $60 million, but “ISRO charged an average of [$3 million] per satellite between 2013 and 2015.” ISRO’s strong position in the satellite-launch market had an inauspicious start. The first PSLV, launched in 1993, failed because of software glitches. By persevering with the program, ISRO was able to take advantage of the country’s talented, but relatively low-wage, workforce to bring launch costs down. Ramabhadran Aravamudan, former director of the ISRO Satellite Center in Bangalore, attributed India’s low launch prices to “cheaper labor costs and a state-led model that doesn't involve ‘industries with their own profit margins,’ ” CNN reported. This approach runs counter to the United State's current strategy of turning orbital spaceflight over to private firms as a means to bring costs down. But ISRO has nonetheless found plenty of customers, and managed to capitalize on another recent trend: the development of lightweight, inexpensive “CubeSats” and “SmallSats” that can be packed into a single rocket. Tuesday’s launch delivered 103 of these smaller satellites – 88 of which belonged to the San Francisco-based imaging company Planet – into orbit, along with a larger environmental satellite. Last year, private launches like these brought in 230 rupees crore (about $3.4 million) for ISRO’s commercial arm. The experience has also enabled ISRO to set more ambitious goals, on a tight budget. The country’s Mangalyaan Mars Orbiter reached the Red Planet in 2014 at a cost of $75 million – less than the budget for the 2013 Sci-Fi thriller “Gravity.” “They're not at the level of the Big 4,” Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, told The Christian Science Monitor last May, referring to the space programs of the US, Russia, China, and Europe. ”But they’re pretty darn good.”


News Article | April 14, 2016
Site: www.techtimes.com

Cartosat-2C, the earth observation satellite of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), will be launched in May atop a PSLV rocket in hopes of proving the country's military surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. A successful launch will place India alongside a few select nations, namely the United States, China, and Israel, which have spy satellites watching the planet from space. Cartosat-2C – the younger kin of Cartosat-2A, the country's first military satellite launched in 2007 – was built in Ahmedabad at the Space Applications Center, then brought to Bengaluru at the ISRO Satellite Center after being tested and evaluated. Little is known at present about the satellite, but ISRO is confident it will get the job done. "[It] is expected to provide very high resolution pictures and videos captured from space," an ISR official told Indian Express. The dual-use satellite weighs 690 kilograms (1,521 pounds) and is armed with a Panchromatic Camera as well as a high-resolution multi-spectral instrument. Boasting a resolution of 0.65 meter when its predecessor has only 0.8 meter, this camera is said to capture high-res images of areas and borders of dispute, and log videos of sensitive targets from space and transmit them back to Earth. Panchromatic imagers, too, are deemed useful for disaster monitoring and recording temperatures of specific locations versus surrounding sites. Along with 21 other satellites, Cartosat-2C will be launched aboard a Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) rocket, positioned in orbit at a low-Earth altitude of around 200 to 1,200 kilometers (approx. 124-745 miles) above planetary surface. The Indian space agency is also keen on increasing the number of PSLV flights to ferry more satellites into space and eventually privatize the rocket’s operations. "We want [industries] to form a consortium to build PSLV and launch satellites," ISRO chair A.S. Kiran Kumar said in a Deccan Chronicle report, citing their target of 12 flights a year initially and then scaling it up to 24 annually. The ISRO has started building its second site for PSLV assembly at Satish Dhawan Space Center, which is estimated ready later this year. A day-long conference on April 21 will offer the consortium proposal to executives from more than 25 Indian industries tapped to fly the PSLV. Joining the consortium is viewed as a launchpad for private enterprises to compete in the global aerospace and defense arena filled with billion-dollar contracts. In February, the chief of the French space agency confirmed that they are in talks with India to put a lander on Mars in their own bid to explore the Red Planet. India's Mars Orbiter Mission arrived in the planet's orbit in September 2014 – the country's first ever interplanetary mission, costing $74 million. © 2016 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | October 26, 2016
Site: www.newscientist.com

China has just launched the world’s first quantum communications satellite. The 600 kg spacecraft blasted off from the Jiuquan Satellite Center in the Gobi Desert at 0140 local time. The satellite is both an extreme test of the weird properties of quantum mechanics, and a technology testbed for what could be the start of a global, unhackable communications network. Officially known as the Quantum Science Satellite (QUESS), the mission has been renamed Mozi after the ancient Chinese philosopher said to be the first in history to conduct optical experiments. A team led by Jian-Wei Pan of the University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei will conduct their own experiments with QUESS, using photons to test quantum entanglement – in which the quantum properties of two particles are linked even when separated – over a record-breaking 1200 kilometres. The team will also test quantum key distribution, a form of secure communication in which the laws of quantum mechanics prevent eavesdroppers from snooping in. If successful, they hope to create a communications network. “For sure, we will launch more satellites to construct a quantum constellation for global coverage,” says Pan. First, QUESS must undergo three months of testing. “If everything is correct, it will be handed to the scientists for scientific experiment,” say Pan. “We have tried our best to make everything correct. Hopefully there will be nothing going wrong.” Other groups around the world working on quantum satellites are watching the Chinese mission with interest. “We can test many things on the ground, but final validation has to be done in orbit,” says Alexander Ling of the Centre for Quantum Technologies in Singapore. “Everyone working on free-space quantum communication is very excited.”


Das P.,Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati | Karthik K.,Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati | Chandra Garai B.,Satellite Center
Pattern Recognition | Year: 2012

Abstraction of a fingerprint in the form of a hash can be used for secure authentication. The main challenge is in finding the right choice of features which remain relatively invariant to distortions such as rotation, translation and minutiae insertions and deletions, while at the same time capturing the diversity across users. In this paper, an alignment-free novel fingerprint hashing algorithm is proposed which uses a graph comprising of the inter-minutia minimum distance vectors originating from the core point as a feature set called the minimum distance graph. Matching of hashes has been implemented using a corresponding search algorithm. Based on the experiments conducted on the FVC2002-DB1a and FVC2002-DB2a databases, we obtained an equal error rate of 2.27%. The computational cost associated with our fingerprint hash generation and matching processes is relatively low, despite its success in capturing the minutia positional variations across users. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Kamesh D.,Satellite Center | Pandiyan R.,Satellite Center | Ghosal A.,Indian Institute of Science
Journal of Sound and Vibration | Year: 2012

Reaction wheel assemblies (RWAs) are momentum exchange devices used in fine pointing control of spacecrafts. Even though the spinning rotor of the reaction wheel is precisely balanced to minimize emitted vibration due to static and dynamic imbalances, precision instrument payloads placed in the neighborhood can always be severely impacted by residual vibration forces emitted by reaction wheel assemblies. The reduction of the vibration level at sensitive payloads can be achieved by placing the RWA on appropriate mountings. A low frequency flexible space platform consisting of folded continuous beams has been designed to serve as a mount for isolating a disturbance source in precision payloads equipped spacecrafts. Analytical and experimental investigations have been carried out to test the usefulness of the low frequency flexible platform as a vibration isolator for RWAs. Measurements and tests have been conducted at varying wheel speeds, to quantify and characterize the amount of isolation obtained from the reaction wheel generated vibration. These tests are further extended to other variants of similar design in order to bring out the best isolation for given disturbance loads. Both time and frequency domain analysis of test data show that the flexible beam platform as a mount for reaction wheels is quite effective and can be used in spacecrafts for passive vibration control. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.


Peter P.K.,Satellite Center | Peter P.K.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Agarwal V.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay
IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics | Year: 2012

The use of a switched capacitor (SC) dc-dc converter for tracking the maximum power point (MPP) of a photovoltaic (PV) array with the possibility of partial shading is described. The SC converter topology can be reconfigured to maximize conversion efficiency depending on the solar radiation and load. A new control scheme for MPP tracking based on tuning the input resistance (R rm IN) of the SC converter MPP tracker with a battery tied load to match the output resistance of the array at MPP is proposed. R rm IN of the SC converter MPP tracker is studied extensively. The limits of R rm IN and its sensitivity to Pulse-width modulation (PWM), frequency modulation (FM), and circuit parameters of the SC converter are analyzed. Based on the sensitivity analysis, the proposed control scheme consists of an inner FM loop for fine control, an outer PWM loop for coarse control, and a provision to increase the dynamic range of R rm IN with adjustments of certain converter circuit parameters. A hardware prototype of a 10-W SC converter-based MPP tracker is built. Experimental measurements on the hardware model confirm the theoretical analysis. An algorithm to implement the MPP tracking control scheme is also tested. © 1986-2012 IEEE.


Hasan M.,Satellite Center | Ghatak A.,Banaras Hindu University | Mandal B.P.,Banaras Hindu University
Annals of Physics | Year: 2014

We consider a non-Hermitian medium with a gain and loss symmetric, exponentially damped potential distribution to demonstrate different scattering features analytically. The condition for critical coupling (CC) for unidirectional wave and coherent perfect absorption (CPA) for bidirectional waves are obtained analytically for this system. The energy points at which total absorption occurs are shown to be the spectral singular points for the time reversed system. The possible energies at which CC occurs for left and right incidence are different. We further obtain periodic intervals with increasing periodicity of energy for CC and CPA to occur in this system. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

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