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Berthelot C.,University of Saskatchewan | Podborochynski D.,University of Saskatchewan | Marjerison B.,Saskatchewan Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure | Saarenketo T.,Roadscanners Oy Urheilukatu 5 7
Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering | Year: 2010

This study investigated the mechanistic climatic constitutive behaviour of granular materials from Saskatchewan, Texas, and Finland. This research employed triaxial frequency sweep testing to characterize various quality granular materials with and without cement modification. Cement stabilization showed a consistent improvement in the response of poor and well graded granular materials, relative to untreated granular materials in terms of both mechanical behavior and climatic durability. As a result, when cement stabilized, poorly graded (or dirty bases) with high fines and (or) fine sand content can be engineered to perform better in the field than well graded (or clean) bases. This research showed that climatic conditioning of laboratory samples significantly influences the mechanical behavior of both unstabilized and cement treated granular materials. Therefore, when characterizing granular base materials for structural design purposes, the mechanistic properties and the effect of climatic conditioning of granular materials representative of field state conditions are needed to provide accurate structural design purposes.


Roh H.-J.,Saskatchewan Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure | Datla S.,City of Edmonton | Sharma S.,University of Regina
Proceedings, Annual Conference - Canadian Society for Civil Engineering | Year: 2013

Described in this paper is an extension of the research presented by the authors in a 2012 CSCE Annual Conference paper. One of the conclusions of that paper was that the total traffic and passenger car volumes are influenced by both the snowfall and the cold temperatures, but the truck volume is not significantly affected by the amount of snowfall or winter temperatures. Influence of the winter conditions on truck type distribution is examined in this paper by classifying trucks into single-unit trucks, single-trailer, and multi-trailer units. The investigation is based on data at a site located on Highway 2A south of Leduc. It is evident from study results that the total number and percenage of trucks in the traffic stream vary from month to month. However, the results of combined Chi-square and Binomial tests of statistical significance indicate that truck type distribution was not associated with the months, or seasons in terms of winter (November to March) and non-winter (April to October) months, In other words, proportion of single-unit trucks, single-trailer, and multi-trailer units in the truck traffic remained essentially stable over the five years (2005 to 2009) study period. It is believed that the findings of this study can benefit highway agencies in developing programs and policies related to efficient monitoring of truck traffic throughout the year. More research is currently underway to confirm the findings of this study by investigating several other WIM sites on Alberta Highways. Copyright © (2013) by the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering.


Berthelot C.,University of Saskatchewan | Podborochynski D.,PSI Technologies Inc | Anthony A.,Saskatchewan Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure | Marjerison B.,Saskatchewan Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure
Transportation Research Record | Year: 2011

The Saskatchewan, Canada, Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure is investigating integrated structural asset management to help optimize investment in the rural low-volume road (LVR) network. Integrated ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and heavyweight deflectometer (HWD) testing were found to be very effective structural assessment tools that might be used to strategically rehabilitate, maintain, and upgrade Saskatchewan's LVR network, which accounts for 80% of the ministry's total network. This paper demonstrates this integration at a project level to assess the pre- and postconstruction structural condition of two LVRs in Saskatchewan. The preconstruction GPR survey applied in this study showed locations of trapped moisture within the road structure's granular materials. The postconstruction HWD assessed the end product structural integrity of the road after its rehabilitation treatment. The ability to strategically allocate limited financial resources across the extensive in-service LVR system in Saskatchewan on the basis of accurate structural asset management infrastructure performance data was essential for this project, given the high variability in Saskatchewan LVR structures.


Berthelot C.,University of Saskatchewan | Podborochynski D.,University of Saskatchewan | Anthony A.,Saskatchewan Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure | Marjerison B.,Saskatchewan Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure
Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering | Year: 2010

This paper provides a performance comparison of mechanistic laboratory and field rutting performance of four asphalt concrete mixes constructed in 1996 at a Strategic Highway Research Program SPS-9A test site located in Saskatchewan. The asphalt mixes included two Saskatchewan Type 70 Marshall mixes and two coarse graded SuperpaveTM mixes and employed 150-200A and 200-300A penetration grade asphalt cement binders. The triaxial frequency sweep characterization determined that the SuperpaveTM mix yielded improved mechanistic structural constitutive properties when compared to the Saskatchewan Type 70 mix. In addition, improved mechanistic structural properties were observed with the mixes employing 150-200A (PG 58-28) asphalt binder relative to the 200-300A (PG 52-34) asphalt binder, particularly the Saskatchewan Type 70 mix. The 10-year rutting performance of the Radisson SPS-9A test site was evaluated and the field rutting results concurred with the triaxial frequency sweep test results. The triaxial frequency sweep characterization employed in this study appears to adequately rank asphalt mixes with respect to field rutting performance.


Roh H.-J.,Saskatchewan Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure
Proceedings, Annual Conference - Canadian Society for Civil Engineering | Year: 2013

Discrete choice modelling process is constrained due to lack of information on alternative estimation methods and the inability of commercial software to enable comparative efficiency tests. Further, the underlying numerical operational procedures used in the software are not displayed to the user. This paper reports research on the comparative efficiency of four selected algorithms that are combined with the Maximum Likelihood method in computationally logical way for estimating the parameters of Multinomial Logit travel mode choice model. The algorithms were formulated and numerical experiments were designed for the comparison of their estimation performance in an access to airport mode choice case study. Also, the important factors of econometric model estimation, namely step size, convergence criterion, and initial guessing of the starting points are studied. The process used here can be applied to mixed logit or other discrete choice model formulations. The findings of this research are expected to enhance discrete choice modelling in transportation planning and will be useful to researchers who wish to develop computer code encompassing estimation algorithms of their choice.


Liu A.G.,Saskatchewan Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure
ICTIS 2011: Multimodal Approach to Sustained Transportation System Development - Information, Technology, Implementation - Proceedings of the 1st Int. Conf. on Transportation Information and Safety | Year: 2011

Network level highway investment normally considers infrastructure's current level of service and future demand based on forecasted traffic growth. Safety improvement initiatives are normally designed to address identified specific substantive safety concerns. It is often the case that substantive safety at highway locations may not correlate to nominal safety. Rural communities relying on low standard roads often feel that their safety concerns may not be adequately considered in the investment decision-making process. There may not be a quantitative relationship between road conditions and substantive safety, however, upgrading low standard roads will certainly improve their nominal safety and address public perception of road safety concerns. It is a challenge in decision-making to balance the investment needs of economic growth demand and community safety concerns. Saskatchewan has developed rural highway strategies to guide capital investment to maximize social and economic benefits. The strategies utilize a multifactor evaluation method to prioritize highway upgrading investment. In addition to economic and traffic considerations, quantifiable road safety factors reflecting both substantive and nominal safety are incorporated into the strategies. Successful incorporation of these factors most concerned for rural highways has made the strategies more acceptable to the public. © 2011 ASCE.

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