Santa Clara, CA, United States

Santa Clara University

www.scu.edu
Santa Clara, CA, United States

Santa Clara University is a private non-profit Jesuit university located in Santa Clara, California. It has 5,435 full-time undergraduate students, and 3,335 graduate students. Founded in 1851, Santa Clara University is the oldest operating institution of higher learning in California, and has remained in its original location for 162 years. The University's campus surrounds the historic Mission Santa Clara de Asis, which traces its founding to 1776. The Campus mirrors the Mission's architectural style, and provides a fine early example of Mission Revival Architecture.The university offers bachelor's degrees, master's degrees, and doctoral degrees through its six colleges, the School of Arts and science, School of Education and Counseling Psychology, SCU Leavey School of Business, School of Engineering, Jesuit School of Theology, and the School of Law.Santa Clara's sports teams are called the Broncos. Their colors are red and white. The Broncos compete at the NCAA Division I levels as members of the West Coast Conference in 19 sports. The Broncos own a long history of success on the national stage in a number of sports. Wikipedia.


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Patent
FutureWei Technologies Inc. and Santa Clara University | Date: 2016-11-21

A method, an apparatus and a decoder for decoding a block of a depth map are provided. An ordered list of decoding modes is obtained, wherein the ordered list of decoding modes comprises a plurality of decoding modes each of which is capable of being used for decoding of the block. A plurality of depth modeling modes (DMMs) each of which is capable of being used for decoding of the block are obtained. And whether a DMM of the plurality of DMMs is to be added into the ordered list of decoding modes in accordance with a decision condition is determined.


Patent
Huawei and Santa Clara University | Date: 2017-06-21

A method for coding a coding unit that is coded with a single sample value is provided. The method selects a coding pattern from at least two predetermined coding patterns, each of which includes a plurality of boundary neighboring samples of the coding unit that have been reconstructed, and decodes the coding unit according to a value of at least one of the plurality of boundary neighboring samples of the selected coding pattern that is available.


Patent
FutureWei Technologies Inc. and Santa Clara University | Date: 2017-02-13

There is disclosed a method, device and computer-readable storage medium for decoding video data. The method includes: obtaining a reference sample array of a video block; obtaining a sum of the reference sample array; calculating a threshold by performing arithmetic right shift to the sum, a shift value of the arithmetic right shift being determined according to size information of the video block; and determining the binary partition pattern by comparing the reference sample array with the threshold.


Patent
Huawei and Santa Clara University | Date: 2017-03-15

A method (500) for reducing a computational load in high efficiency video coding includes generating (504) a full rate distortion calculation list of selected intra coding modes where the intra coding modes including intra prediction modes and depth modeling modes. A rate distortion cost is determined, with a segment-wise depth coding mode being disabled, for each intra prediction mode in the full rate distortion calculation list and a smallest rate distortion cost intra prediction mode is selected (506). A rate distortion cost for a particular intra prediction mode is calculated with the segment-wise depth coding mode enabled (510). After comparison (512), one of the particular intra prediction mode (514) and the smallest rate distortion cost intra prediction mode (516) having the smallest rate distortion cost is applied to a prediction unit.


Depth based block partitioning in high efficiency video coding is provided by partitioning (1102) a video image block into different partitions using a binary segmentation mask. A determination (1108) is made whether to filter pixels at a boundary between the partitions. A particular pixel is not filtered (1110) in response to each adjacent pixel in vertical and horizontal planes in relation to the particular pixel having a same value. The particular pixel is filtered (1112) in response to any adjacent pixel in the vertical and horizontal planes in relation to the particular pixel having a different value than any other adjacent pixel in the vertical and horizontal planes in relation to the particular pixel. Pixels are filtered pursuant to a filtering process (1114) in response to a filtering determination.


Patent
Santa Clara University | Date: 2016-04-06

A wearable reminder device is provided using two different types of gestures obtained from two different types of sensors. The device outputs audio to a user but does not have a display, a keypad, or speech recognition software, therewith significantly reducing size, storage requirements and power consumption. Hence the device is suitable for use by the blind, persons with a speech impediment, visually impaired persons, and others who are unable to read small fonts.


Patent
Santa Clara University | Date: 2016-02-18

This work provides an affordable approach for detecting environmental contaminants (e.g., arsenic in groundwater). Electro-chemical analysis of a sample is performed using a disposable three-electrode sensor that can be connected to an electrochemical analyzer (which is not disposable). The disposable sensor has a sample chamber to admit a liquid sample. The sensor includes a substrate disposed within the sample chamber that includes at least one conditioning reagent to condition the sample for electrochemical analysis. Analysis results can be displayed via a mobile device application.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ARCHAEOLOGY | Award Amount: 104.75K | Year: 2016

Drs. Lee Panich, of Santa Clara University, and Tsim Schneider, of the University of California Santa Cruz, will direct a collaborative research project to understand how Native American societies persisted under Euro-American colonialism. While common understandings of colonial impacts on indigenous peoples in the Americas have focused on depopulation and loss of cultural traditions, archaeological research is uniquely positioned to offer insight into the active strategies Native Americans employed to navigate the changes of the colonial period. Archaeological data can be used to track developments that are not well represented in historical documents, such as long-term adjustments to indigenous social organization, mobility, and economic connections. By examining how Native Americans drew upon existing social and cultural patterns to negotiate increasingly complex interactions with Euro-American colonists, scholars can better understand the autonomy exercised by indigenous societies despite the challenges they faced in the colonial era. Because contemporary notions of Native American sovereignty largely hinge on the events of the colonial period, this research is directly relevant to broader debates about indigenous culture change and the popular and governmental recognition of Native American groups today. It is also relevant to understanding the nature of multi-ethnic interactions which occur in many regions of the contemporary world and how ethnic groups negotiate with and are incorporated into nation states.
The project expands the focus of archaeological studies of colonialism beyond European settlements and first contact situations to investigate how native people living outside of direct colonial control selectively engaged with different colonial institutions over time. Drs. Panich and Schneider, along with their research team, will examine these issues on the Pacific Coast of central California, where local Coast Miwok groups lived at the crossroads of the Spanish, Russian, Mexican, and American frontiers. The research is designed to evaluate Native Americans different strategies for maintaining autonomy at four politically and economically important village sites that were occupied from prehistoric times through the colonial period. Data will be drawn from targeted archaeological investigations, state-of-the-art laboratory analysis of archaeological materials collected during the mid-twentieth century, a GIS database of regional archaeological sites, and a systematic review of relevant ethnographic and historical literature. Working in conjunction with the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, the researchers will provide training in archaeological methods to tribal scholars as well as university students. The investigators will work closely with the tribe and local landowners to use the results of the project to develop culturally sensitive stewardship guidelines and public interpretive materials.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: PHYSICAL & DYNAMIC METEOROLOGY | Award Amount: 109.98K | Year: 2016

This Rapid Response Research (RAPID) award is for the collection of precipitation data in California during the 2015-16 strong El Nino event. Researchers will study atmospheric rivers, which are plumes of moisture from the tropics that enhance storms and bring substantial precipitation to the west coast of the United States. This project will complement an ongoing study of these events by adding additional measurement locations for stable isotopes of precipitation data. Isotopic analysis of rainfall can provide insight into the source and the phase change history of water, which gives scientists a better idea of how and why heavy rainfall events are initiated. A better understanding of the precipitation during atmospheric river events should help improve weather and climate models. The work will also help to train the next generation of scientists by including a diverse group of undergraduate students in the collection and analysis of data.

The research team plans to quantitatively evaluate the origin and rainout of moisture with the stable isotopes of water and water vapor, and address three main scientific questions: 1) What are the relationships between aerosols and precipitation amount, efficiency and phase? 2) What are the stable isotope signatures of extreme precipitation events and which macro-and micro-scale dynamics are responsible for producing them? and 3) What are the moisture sources of extreme precipitation events and how do these sources change within storms? This RAPID project will complement an existing observational effort related to the CALWATER-2 field program by including additional measurement sites and an instrument to measure real-time stable isotopes of water vapor. After the campaign the PI team will analyze around 1500 water samples while collaborators will analyze ice and cloud condensation nuclei chemistry. Synoptic scale and backtrajectory analysis will also be performed with the WRF model.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SCIENCE OF SCIENCE POLICY | Award Amount: 263.25K | Year: 2016

Entrepreneurship is critical for job creation, economic growth, and innovation. Given the difficulty of starting and building new firms, public and private organizations have created venture development programs to help firms survive and succeed. The programs offer services, education and access to resources. Examples of venture development programs include government innovation grants, business incubators, private accelerators, university-based incubators, and venture capital. Billions of dollars are spent each year on and by venture development programs in the U.S. alone. Work has shown that these programs generally work; however, few studies have looked at the long term outcomes of these programs or the relative performance of the participating firms. This study develops a deeper understanding of nascent firm participation in venture development programs by determining how and why entrepreneurs use these programs, examining how development programs influence firm outcomes, and identifying the most useful elements of each type of program.

This research study has three parts. The first part builds a data set of nanotechnology firms in the U.S. by integrating several sources and includes detailed information about each firm, its participation in venture development programs, and the firms? outcomes. This part of the study provides insight into the types of firms that participate in the different programs. The next part of the study statistically examines how the participation in a program influences firm success. Multiple positive and negative firm outcomes are included such as business closure, bankruptcy, liquidation, acquisition, follow-on funding, and initial public offering to develop rich insights into these programs. The last part of this study asks firm founders about their participation in venture development programs and how their engagement of the programs influenced their firms? outcomes. Thus, this research expands our understanding of how technology firm founders can influence the longevity of their firms by participating in venture development programs. Understanding how entrepreneurs choose and engage these programs can improve the offerings from both the private and public sectors. Programs that influence the success of technology ventures are important for innovation, employment, and the federal funding of related education, research and development. Thus, this study supports policy makers in their endeavors to improve the development and availability of services and economic resources that support venture growth, innovation and national competitiveness.

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