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Santa Barbara, CA, United States

Patent
Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. | Date: 2015-10-19

A first substrate having an array of emitters or detectors may be joined by bump bonding with a second substrate having read-in (RIIC) or read-out (ROIC) circuitry. After the two substrates are joined, the resulting assembly may be singulated to form sub-arrays such as tiles sub-arrays having pixel elements which may be arranged on a routing layer or carrier to form a larger array. Edge features of the tiles may provide for physical alignment, mechanical attachment and chip-to-chip communication. The pixel elements may be thermal emitter elements for IR image projectors, thermal detector elements for microbolometers, LED-based emitters, or quantum photon detectors such as those found in visible, infrared and ultraviolet FPAs (focal plane arrays), and the like.


Irwin A.,Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. | Grigor J.,Santa Barbara Infrared Inc.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2014

The Minimum Resolvable Temperature Difference test (MRTD) is one of the tests typically required to characterize the performance of thermal imaging systems. The traditional test methodology is very time intensive, requiring data collection at multiple temperatures and target frequencies. This paper will present an alternate methodology using a controlled blackbody temperature ramp rate. This allows selection of the temperature at which a target is determined "resolveda" without stopping. Test results using the traditional method will be compared to test results using this alternate method. © 2014 SPIE. Source


Patent
Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. | Date: 2012-10-21

Sub-arrays such as tiles or chips having pixel elements arranged on a routing layer or carrier to form a larger array. Through-chip vias or the like to the backside of the chip are used for connecting with the pixel elements. Edge features of the tiles may provide for physical alignment, mechanical attachment and chip-to-chip communication. Edge damage tolerance with minimal loss of function may be achieved by moving unit cell circuitry and the electrically active portions of a pixel element away from the tile edge(s) while leaving the optically active portion closer to the edge(s) if minor damage will not cause a complete failure of the pixel. The pixel elements may be thermal emitter elements for IR image projectors, thermal detector elements for microbolometers, LED-based emitters, or quantum photon detectors such as those found in visible, infrared and ultraviolet FPAs (focal plane arrays), and the like. Various architectures are disclosed.


La Veigne J.,Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. | Szarlan T.,Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. | Radtke N.,Santa Barbara Infrared Inc.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2011

Usage of image intensified (I2) and other low light level devices have grown considerably over the past decade1,2 As the systems have become more common place, the demand for production line test equipment has also grown. Accurate measurements of device response are a key part of determining acceptable system operation. However, differences in the spectral response of the unit under test (UUT) devices and the control detector; and the spectral distribution of the source, can lead to errors in test accuracy. These errors can be compounded by spectral variation in the source (or color temperature shifts) as a function of attenuation. These issues are often further confused by test system requirements that are not consistent with the desired parameter to be measured. For example, source requirements are often specified in illuminance while the UUT actually measures irradiance. We report on the calibration of a large dynamic range light source test system (> 7 orders), and discuss output compensation approaches for systems which control in a band different than the UUT being tested. © 2011 SPIE. Source


Irwin A.,Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. | Laveigne J.,Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. | Nehring B.,Santa Barbara Infrared Inc.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2011

Test Program Set (TPS) software development for Electro-Optical (EO) testing has traditionally been an expensive and lengthy process. A major cause of this has been the development of new test executive software on an ad hoc basis for each program. Furthermore, there have typically been different needs for production versus lab environments with production needing a set of standard tests, while users in a lab environment requiring the capability to modify certain aspects of their tests as needed. At Santa Barbara Infrared, a new architecture for TPS development has been engineered that addresses these concerns. The new architecture can host a complete TPS development environment that eliminates the need for a separate test executive. It supports EO testing in both engineering development and production testing through the use of user editable test scripts along with distinct user accounts and privileges. The new architecture is unit under test (UUT) centric, allowing a user to define UUT parameters once and easily share the results between tests. In this article we will review the new architecture and give examples of TPS development under that architecture. © 2011 SPIE. Source

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