Sanken Microphone Co.

Suginami-ku, Japan

Sanken Microphone Co.

Suginami-ku, Japan

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Sasaki Y.,NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories | Nishiguchi T.,NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories | Ono K.,NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories | Ishii T.,Sanken Microphone Co. | And 2 more authors.
141st Audio Engineering Society International Convention 2016, AES 2016 | Year: 2016

A shotgun microphone having sharper directivity than a conventional microphone has been studied to capture distant sound clearly. The directivity of the shotgun microphone is known to become sharper with a longer leaky acoustic tube. Thus, we developed a prototype microphone that uses a 1-m-long leaky acoustic tube, which is longer than the conventional one. We also conducted a numerical simulation based on an acoustical distribution constant circuit to develop such a shotgun microphone. The measurement results of the prototype microphone were in fairly good agreement with the simulation results, and they showed that the directivity is very narrow.


Ono K.,NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories | Sugimoto T.,NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories | Ando A.,NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories | Hamasaki K.,NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories | And 3 more authors.
129th Audio Engineering Society Convention 2010 | Year: 2010

Line microphones have long been popular for use as narrow directional microphones. Their structure is comprised of a leaky acoustic tube with many slits to suppress off-axis sensitivity, together with a directional capsule attached to this tube. Although many microphones of this type are currently on the market, there seems to be no quantitative model to explain their behavior, which is very important in terms of effectively designing the directivity. We thus modeled a leaky acoustic tube using a distributed equivalent circuit and combined it with the directional capsule's equivalent circuit model. Analysis showed that the model agreed well with the measurement results, particularly at the directional characteristics, while the conventional model adopting acoustic tube by delay-and-sum modeling did not.


Sugimoto T.,Advanced Television Systems Research Division | Iwaki M.,NHK | Ono K.,Advanced Television Systems Research Division | Ando A.,Advanced Television Systems Research Division | And 3 more authors.
IEEE Transactions on Broadcasting | Year: 2010

A novel microphone that enables rear sensitivity to be significantly suppressed has been developed to improve open-air recording quality. Its assembly comprises a line microphone capsule and a second-order pressure gradient directional microphone. In conventional line microphones, residual rear sensitivity causes an influx of unexpected noise, especially at lower frequencies. Our microphone successfully suppresses rear sensitivity by more than 10 dB compared to conventional line microphones in the frequency range below 1 kHz in which major outdoor noise often occurs. Furthermore, it needs no complicated signal processing circuit and can be driven by a normal 48 V phantom power supply. Finally, our microphone was tested in on-the-spot broadcasts. Its rear sensitivity suppression proved to be effective for practical use, and its sound quality was found to be sufficient for use in TV programs. This paper describes the fundamental principle of the microphone's rear sensitivity suppression, the measurement results of its acoustic characteristics and field-test results obtained with it in on-the-spot broadcasts. © 2006 IEEE.


Sugimoto T.,Advanced Television Systems Research Division | Iwaki M.,NHK | Ono K.,Advanced Television Systems Research Division | Ando A.,Advanced Television Systems Research Division | And 3 more authors.
Kyokai Joho Imeji Zasshi/Journal of the Institute of Image Information and Television Engineers | Year: 2012

This paper describes a miniaturization of a narrow-angle directional microphone that enables rear sensitivity to be significantly suppressed. The microphone assembly comprises of a line microphone capsule and a second-order pressure gradient directional microphone. This combination successfully reduced the residual rear sensitivity of conventional line microphones. The previously proposed microphone is too long to set in a small space. Therefore, the microphone is miniaturized by using small electret condenser microphone capsules, which are stacked in the small case, and by modifying the line microphone capsule's directivity to hypercardioid. The proposed microphone successfully suppresses rear sensitivity by more than 20 dB compared to the frontal sensitivity in the frequency range from 130 Hz to 2.5 kHz. Furthermore, it can be driven by a normal 48 V phantom power supply. Finally, the microphone was tested in several on-the-spot broadcasts, and it proved to be effective for practical use.


Sugimoto T.,NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories | Irie K.,NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories | Ono K.,NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories | Chiba Y.,Sanken Microphone Co. | And 2 more authors.
Acoustical Science and Technology | Year: 2013

We developed a blast-proof high sound pressure microphone with maximum input SPL of 160 dB and successfully recorded the space shuttle launch. In future, we will downsize the microphone and widen its frequency range. © 2013 The Acoustical Society of Japan.

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