San Diego, CA, United States

San Diego State University

www.sdsu.edu
San Diego, CA, United States

San Diego State University is a public research university in San Diego, and is the largest and oldest higher education facility in San Diego County. Founded in 1897 as San Diego Normal School, it is the third-oldest university in the 23-member California State University . SDSU has a student body of more than 35,000 and an alumni base of more than 260,000.The Carnegie Foundation has designated San Diego State University a "Research University with high research activity," placing it among the top 200 higher education institutions in the country conducting research. In the 2009–10 academic year, the university obtained $150 million for research, including $26 million from the National Institutes of Health. The university soon expects to be classified as "Doctoral/Research-Extensive." As reported by the Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index released by the Academic Analytics organization of Stony Brook, New York, SDSU is the number one small research university in the United States for four academic years in a row. SDSU sponsors the second highest number of Fulbright Scholars in the state of California, just behind UC Berkeley. Since 2005, the university has produced over 40 Fulbright student scholars.The university generates over $2.4 billion annually for the San Diego economy, while sixty percent of SDSU graduates remain in San Diego, making SDSU a primary educator of the region's work force. Committed to serving the diverse San Diego region, SDSU ranks among the top ten universities nationwide in terms of ethnic and racial diversity among its student body, as well as the number of bachelor's degrees conferred upon minority students.San Diego State University is a member of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, the American Association of State Colleges and Universities , the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges, and the Southwest Border Security Consortium. Wikipedia.


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Patent
San Diego State University | Date: 2015-03-05

The invention provides methods for preparing boronic acids, for example, primary alkyl or alkenyl boronic acids, and alkali metal alkyl trifluoro borate salts, as described herein, wherein the primary alkyl boronic acids and the potassium alkyl trifluoroborate salts can contain one or more unprotected functional groups.


The invention is directed to computer implemented methods, systems, and devices for improving a reconstruction model, e.g. historical precipitation reconstruction model for a given region, by applying a standard multivariate regression analysis to the reconstruction model to obtain a truncated sampling error variance from sampling the first set of empirical orthogonal functions, wherein the reconstruction model is improved when the reconstruction is combined with the quantified minimum sampling error.


Disclosed herein are systems and methods directed to routing in the wireless mesh network (WMN) with multi-beam directional antennas (MBDAs). The disclosed systems and methods describe Ripple-Diamond-Chain (RDC) shaped routing, systematic link quality modeling and artificial intelligence (AI) augmented path link selection. In simulations, real-time video as well as other types of traffic types are used to validate the high-throughput, quality of service (QoS)-differentiated, multi-beam routing efficiency of the disclosed systems and methods, as well as the intelligent path determination in dynamic WMN environments.


Patent
San Diego State University | Date: 2016-05-31

The invention is directed to compositions to screen for small molecule drugs that inhibit proteases, such as viral proteases, e.g., HIV proteases; and methods for making and using these compositions. The invention provides compositions and methods for identifying compositions, e.g., drug molecules, that can inhibit proteases, e.g., HIV proteases. In alternative embodiments, the invention provides cell-based assays to screen for compositions, e.g., small molecules or drugs, that inhibit or modify the activity of enzymes such as calcium-dependent protein convertases involved in HIV envelop protein processing, including cleavage of the HIV gp160 envelope precursor, resulting in gp120 and gp41 envelope products.


Patent
San Diego State University | Date: 2014-01-18

The invention is directed to compositions to screen for compounds, e.g., small molecules or drugs, that can modulate or inhibit enzymes, e.g., proteases, such as viral proteases, e.g., HIV proteases; and methods for making and using these compositions. In alternative embodiment, the invention provides compositions and methods for identifying compositions, e.g., drug molecules that can modulate or inhibit enzymes, e.g., proteases, proteinases or peptidases or the like, e.g., HIV proteases. In alternative embodiments, the invention provides cell-based assays to screen for compositions, e.g., small molecules or drugs, that modulate or inhibit or modify the activity of enzymes such as proteases, proteinases or peptidases or the like, such as calcium-dependent protein convertases involved in HIV envelop protein processing, including cleavage of the HIV gp160 envelope precursor, resulting in gp120 and gp41 envelope products. In alternative embodiment, the compositions and methods of the invention are adapted for high through-put or multiplexed screening of compounds, e.g., drug molecules that can modulate or inhibit enzymes.


Patent
SK Innovation Co. and San Diego State University | Date: 2016-12-28

The present invention relates to a recombinant methanotroph having an ability to produce isoprene and a method for producing isoprene using the same, and more particularly to a recombinant methanotroph having an ability to produce isoprene wherein a gene encoding an isoprene synthase having a homology of at least 70% to the amino acid sequence of Ipomoea batatas isoprene synthase is introduced into the recombinant methanotroph, and a method for producing isoprene using the recombinant methanotroph. The use of a recombinant methanotroph according to the present invention enables isoprene to be produced in high yield by using methane gas or methanol which is obtained from waste such as natural gas, biomass, municipal waste or the like as a carbon source.


Patent
San Diego State University | Date: 2015-10-10

Provided herein are systems and methods for an iterative approach to topic modeling and the use of web mapping technology to implement advanced spatial operators for interactive high-dimensional visualization and inference.


Patent
The Regents Of The University Of California and San Diego State University | Date: 2015-08-07

A hearing assistance and/or noise suppression device leverages computing power of an external device with a digital signal processor, such as a special unit that is configured to communicate with a smart device (e.g., a smart phone, smart watch or smart pendant) or a smart phone with a digital signal processor. Methods include having a hearing transducer communicate with and offload computing tasks to an external device with a digital signal processor. Systems include a hearing transducer with transducer circuitry that receives, amplifies and outputs digital signal processed audio from another device. Methods provide self-adjustment and fitting through a touch screen interface, which can be conducted outside of a clinical setting in a real world environment, and method can include remote data collection and communications with clinicians.


Waters E.R.,San Diego State University
Journal of Experimental Botany | Year: 2013

Small heat shock proteins are a diverse, ancient, and important family of proteins. All organisms possess small heat shock proteins (sHSPs), indicating that these proteins evolved very early in the history of life prior to the divergence of the three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya). Comparing the structures of sHSPs from diverse organisms across these three domains reveals that despite considerable amino acid divergence, many structural features are conserved. Comparisons of the sHSPs from diverse organisms reveal conserved structural features including an oligomeric form with a β-sandwich that forms a hollow ball. This conservation occurs despite significant divergence in primary sequences. It is well established that sHSPs are molecular chaperones that prevent misfolding and irreversible aggregation of their client proteins. Most notably, the sHSPs are extremely diverse and variable in plants. Some plants have >30 individual sHSPs. Land plants, unlike other groups, possess distinct sHSP subfamilies. Most are highly up-regulated in response to heat and other stressors. Others are selectively expressed in seeds and pollen, and a few are constitutively expressed. As a family, sHSPs have a clear role in thermotolerance, but attributing specific effects to individual proteins has proved challenging. Considerable progress has been made during the last 15 years in understanding the sHSPs. However, answers to many important questions remain elusive, suggesting that the next 15 years will be at least equally rewarding. © 2012 The Author(s).


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ARCTIC NATURAL SCIENCES | Award Amount: 211.36K | Year: 2017

The element, chlorine, is not normally studied in natural environments, except in areas that have been contaminated with toxic compounds like pesticides, industrial solvents or radioactive 36Cl. It is often assumed that chlorine enters non-contaminated ecosystems mostly in the form of chloride (the same negative ion in table salt), and that chloride does not interact with plants or soil microorganisms. However, there is growing evidence that chloride is taken up and transformed by plants and soil microorganisms into complex chlorine-containing organic compounds. In environments where oxygen is scarce, some bacteria can use these chlorinated organic compounds instead of oxygen in a form of anaerobic respiration called organohalide respiration (OHR). In this way, these bacteria can quickly use up energy sources that would otherwise be used to produce methane. This means that an active biological chlorine cycle could reduce the amount of methane that is released into the atmosphere. Methane is a strong greenhouse gas, trapping about 30 times as much heat per molecule as carbon dioxide. The Arctic region has been warming faster than the rest of the planet, and large amounts of organic carbon are stored in Arctic soils. It is thus important to understand how much soil carbon will be lost to the atmosphere in the form of carbon dioxide or methane, since these two gases have different effects on the climate the climate system. This project measures rates of biological chlorine cycling in locations across the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska, and tests whether organohalide respiration does in fact significantly reduces methane production in these areas. This project could inform models of greenhouse gas emissions, improve understanding of the fate of chlorinated contaminants in Arctic soils, and further the basic science of biological chlorine cycling. The project will involve students at a minority-serving institution (San Diego State University) and a high school teacher, who will lead broader outreach and education efforts.

The proposed research addresses the following two questions: (1) Does OHR inhibit methanogenesis via competition for H2? (2) How does the relative magnitude of Cl cycling and its relationship to CH4 flux change along a coastal-inland gradient in the Arctic Coastal Plain? The experimental approach consists of a field survey that compares CH4 fluxes and indicators of Cl cycling along a gradient of coastal influence from Barrow to the foothills of the Brooks Range, and a laboratory incubation experiment to study the relationships among OHR, methanogenesis, other terminal electron acceptor processes, and H2 availability. Indicators of Cl cycling include sizes and transformation rates of soil Cl pools, metagenomes describing the relative abundance of genes and microbial taxa associated with Cl cycling and other anaerobic processes, and 37Cl and 36Cl isotopic analysis to infer the dominant Cl cycling processes and to constrain long-term cycling rates. The laboratory incubation will follow anaerobic processes (OHR, iron reduction, methanogenesis, acetogenesis, and sulfate reduction) in microcosms varying in Clorg and H2 concentration to establish the thermodynamic hierarchy among these processes and whether competition is alleviated by increased H2.

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