San Diego Prevention Research Center

San Diego, United States

San Diego Prevention Research Center

San Diego, United States
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Molina M.A.,San Diego Prevention Research Center
Journal of immigrant and minority health | Year: 2015

Research examining border crossing and health has focused on substance abuse, healthcare utilization and air pollution. Living in border communities allows for frequent crossing and exposure to different sociocultural and structural environments. Given high rates of obesity among Latinos and the large percentage living in border communities, it is important to consider the relationship between border crossing and obesity. This study explored the relationship between frequency of border crossing, obesigenic behaviors, measured obesity, and chronic disease. Multistage sampling methods were used to recruit 397 Latino adults living in border communities in South San Diego County. Selected participants completed a face-to-face interview and height and weight measurements. More frequent border crossing was associated with more fast food consumption and a greater reported diagnosis of high cholesterol. Understanding the extent to which border crossing is associated with obesigenic behaviors and chronic disease is important for developing relevant interventions along the border.


Finlayson T.L.,San Diego State University | Asgari P.,San Diego Prevention Research Center | Hoffman L.,San Diego Prevention Research Center | Palomo-Zerfas A.,Vista Community Clinic | And 4 more authors.
Health Promotion Practice | Year: 2017

Oral health is a leading unmet health need among migrant families. This article describes the 1-year, community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach employed to plan and develop a Líder Communitario (lay community health worker)–led educational intervention for Mexican migrant adult caregivers and their families in three underserved, remote communities in North San Diego County, California. Four partner organizations collaborated, reviewed existing oral health curricula, and sought extensive input on educational topics and research design from key informants, migrant caregivers, and Líderes Communitarios. Based on community stakeholder input, partners developed a logic model and drafted educational intervention materials. Key informants (n = 28), including several members from two community advisory boards, ranked program priorities and intervention subgroup population via online survey. Three focus groups were conducted with Líderes Communitarios (n = 22) and three with migrant families (n = 30) regarding the oral health program’s design and content. Twelve Líderes Communitarios reviewed draft intervention materials during two focus groups to finalize the curriculum, and their recommended changes were incorporated. Formative research results indicated that community stakeholders preferred to focus on adult caregivers and their families. A 5-week educational intervention with hands on demonstrations and colorful visuals was developed, covering the following topics: bacteria and tooth decay, oral hygiene, nutrition, gum disease, and dental services. The CBPR process engaged multiple community stakeholders in all aspects of planning and developing the educational intervention. © 2016, Society for Public Health Education.


Quintana P.J.E.,San Diego State University | Dumbauld J.J.,San Diego State University | Garnica L.,San Diego State University | Chowdhury M.Z.,San Diego State University | And 16 more authors.
Atmospheric Environment | Year: 2014

The San Diego/Tijuana US-Mexico border crossing at the San Ysidro Port of Entry (POE) is the world's busiest international land border crossing (GSA, 2013). San Ysidro, California, is the US community immediately adjacent to the border crossing. More than 90% of San Ysidro residents are Hispanic, and the average household income is less than 60% of the San Diego regional average. This study investigated the San Ysidro POE as a source of traffic-related air pollutants in San Ysidro, especially in relation to wind direction and northbound vehicle wait times. The pollutants ultrafine particulate matter (UFP), black carbon (BC), and particulate matter <2.5μm in diameter (PM2.5) were periodically sampled through the course of 2010 at four rooftop locations: one commercial establishment near the POE, two elementary schools in San Ysidro, and a coastal estuary reference site. Weather data from two nearby sites and northbound border wait times were also collected. Results indicate consistently higher daytime BC and UFP concentrations at the measurement sites near the POE. Pollution concentrations were higher during low wind speeds or when wind was blowing from the POE towards San Ysidro. In February, March and November measurements, black carbon pollution appeared to be significantly positively associated with the POE northbound wait times when the wind direction was blowing from the POE towards San Ysidro or during low wind speeds, but not when the wind direction was from the west/northwest towards the POE. This pilot study is the first to investigate the potential effect of the POE, especially the long northbound traffic delays, on the nearby community of San Ysidro. Disparities in traffic exposures are an environmental justice issue and this should be taken into account during planning and operation of POEs. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Molina M.A.,San Diego Prevention Research Center | Ayala G.X.,San Diego Prevention Research Center | Ayala G.X.,San Diego State University | Baquero B.,University of Iowa | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health | Year: 2014

Research examining border crossing and health has focused on substance abuse, healthcare utilization and air pollution. Living in border communities allows for frequent crossing and exposure to different sociocultural and structural environments. Given high rates of obesity among Latinos and the large percentage living in border communities, it is important to consider the relationship between border crossing and obesity. This study explored the relationship between frequency of border crossing, obesigenic behaviors, measured obesity, and chronic disease. Multistage sampling methods were used to recruit 397 Latino adults living in border communities in South San Diego County. Selected participants completed a face-to-face interview and height and weight measurements. More frequent border crossing was associated with more fast food consumption and a greater reported diagnosis of high cholesterol. Understanding the extent to which border crossing is associated with obesigenic behaviors and chronic disease is important for developing relevant interventions along the border. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Hawari F.I.,King Hussein Cancer Center | Bader R.K.,King Hussein Cancer Center | Beano H.M.,University of Jordan | Obeidat N.A.,King Hussein Cancer Center | And 8 more authors.
BMC Public Health | Year: 2011

Background: In commitment to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), four new pictorial warnings are now being proposed for display on cigarette packages sold in Jordan. The aim of this study was to gauge the immediate perceptions of young Jordanian adults towards these new pictorials and compare these perceptions to those of the pictorial currently being used in the country. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on a convenience sample of youth aged 17-26. The interviewer-administered survey gauged participants' perceptions of salience, fear elicitation, and gained information as well as participants' motivation to remain non-smokers or quit smoking after viewing each of the four proposed new pictorials as well as the current pictorial used in Jordan. Perceptions regarding each new pictorial were compared to the current pictorial. Results: A total of 450 surveys were included in the analysis. The sample (mean age 20.9) was 51.6% female and 31.3% cigarette (regular or occasional) smokers. In smokers, only one proposed pictorial had significantly more smokers perceiving it as salient or adding to information when compared to the current pictorial. More smokers reported fear when observing the proposed pictorials compared with current pictorial, but overall proportions reporting fear were generally less than 50%. Furthermore, all new pictorials motivated significantly more smokers to consider quitting compared with the current pictorial; however, the overall proportion of smokers reporting motivation was < 25%. Among nonsmokers, significantly more respondents perceived the new pictorials as salient and fear-eliciting compared to the old pictorial, but there were no major differences in information added. Motivation to remain non-smokers was comparable between the old and new pictorials. Conclusion: Given the variability of response across both smokers and nonsmokers, and across the three elements of perception (salience, added information, fear) for each pictorial, further testing of the pictorials in a more diverse sample of Jordanian young adults prior to launch is recommended. © 2011 Hawari et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Ayala G.X.,San Diego Prevention Research Center
American Journal of Public Health | Year: 2011

Objectives: This within-participants, single time-series study tested a train-thetrainer, promotor-based physical activity (PA) intervention to improve fitness and health indicators. Methods: Thirty unpaid promotores were trained to promote PA through free exercise classes. Measurements of 337 female community participants at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months assessed changes in health indicators, including systolic and diastolic blood pressure, waist circumference, body mass index (defined as weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters), aerobic fitness, and hamstring flexibility, as well as self-reported health indicators (PA, depression) and psychosocial factors (barriers, self-efficacy, and social support-all specific to PA). Results: Mixed effects models showed intervention participation improved systolic blood pressure (P≤.001), waist circumference (P≤.001), fitness (P≤.001), and hamstring flexibility (P≤.001). We also noted improvements in use of community resources (P≤.05), depressed mood and anhedonia (P≤.01), perceived barriers to be physically active (P≤.05), and community support for PA (P≤.001). Self-efficacy decreased (P≤.05), and participation dose (i.e., exposure), as measured by attendance at exercise classes, was not associated with observed changes. Conclusions: Promotores can promote PA in their community and achieve meaningful changes in the residents' health.


Madanat H.N.,San Diego State University | Madanat H.N.,San Diego Prevention Research Center | Madanat H.N.,University of California at San Diego | Lindsay R.,San Diego State University | And 2 more authors.
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition | Year: 2011

The purpose of this study was to examine the nutrition transition in four countries with respect to body dissatisfaction and eating styles. The target population for this study was college students in China (n=207), Japan (n=865), Jordan (n=322), and the United States (n=432). A cross-sectional survey was used to assess eating styles, disordered eating attitudes and behaviors, body esteem and dissatisfaction, and media influence. Results indicated that the Chinese sample was in an earlier stage of the nutrition transition, followed by Japan, Jordan, and the US. Interestingly, Jordanian and Chinese students exhibited the lowest level of body dissatisfaction. However, Jordanian students exhibited high levels of restrained eating similar to those seen in the Japanese and American students. The Japanese sample demonstrated a complex relationship between the culture of thinness, body dissatisfaction and eating styles. However the US sample reflected the expected levels of body dissatisfaction, high levels of restrained eating, emotional eating, and disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. Implications and suggestions for further research are discussed.


PubMed | San Diego Prevention Research Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: American journal of public health | Year: 2011

This within-participants, single time-series study tested a train-the-trainer, promotor-based physical activity (PA) intervention to improve fitness and health indicators.Thirty unpaid promotores were trained to promote PA through free exercise classes. Measurements of 337 female community participants at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months assessed changes in health indicators, including systolic and diastolic blood pressure, waist circumference, body mass index (defined as weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters), aerobic fitness, and hamstring flexibility, as well as self-reported health indicators (PA, depression) and psychosocial factors (barriers, self-efficacy, and social support-all specific to PA).Mixed effects models showed intervention participation improved systolic blood pressure (P .001), waist circumference (P .001), fitness (P .001), and hamstring flexibility (P .001). We also noted improvements in use of community resources (P .05), depressed mood and anhedonia (P .01), perceived barriers to be physically active (P .05), and community support for PA (P .001). Self-efficacy decreased (P .05), and participation dose (i.e., exposure), as measured by attendance at exercise classes, was not associated with observed changes.Promotores can promote PA in their community and achieve meaningful changes in the residents health.


PubMed | San Diego Prevention Research Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The journal of primary prevention | Year: 2013

Over 20years ago, university-community partnerships (i.e., Prevention Research Centers [PRCs]) across the United States were funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to conduct research and training in order to promote health and prevent disease in underserved populations. In 2004, the San Diego PRC (SDPRC) became the first PRC to focus on obesity prevention and control in a community of mostly Mexican Americans/Mexican immigrants. The SDPRC was also the first PRC to comprise a university-community partnership with a school of public health, a school of medicine, and a federally qualified health center. In conjunction with two additional funded community partners and involvement of a community advisory board, the SDPRC seeks to develop effective intervention strategies that ultimately lead to behavior change. Now in its second cycle of funding, the SDPRC has identified three primary principles that are important for these and similar efforts: (1) developing culturally appropriate interventions requires community engagement; (2) building the evidence in a systematic and rigorous way yields meaningful strategies for translation to practice; and (3) translating evidence-based interventions to practice involves capacity building for both researchers and community partners. This article describes these principles to help others involved in similar intervention efforts identify the best approach for promoting health in their own communities.


PubMed | San Diego Prevention Research Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of immigrant and minority health | Year: 2015

Research examining border crossing and health has focused on substance abuse, healthcare utilization and air pollution. Living in border communities allows for frequent crossing and exposure to different sociocultural and structural environments. Given high rates of obesity among Latinos and the large percentage living in border communities, it is important to consider the relationship between border crossing and obesity. This study explored the relationship between frequency of border crossing, obesigenic behaviors, measured obesity, and chronic disease. Multistage sampling methods were used to recruit 397 Latino adults living in border communities in South San Diego County. Selected participants completed a face-to-face interview and height and weight measurements. More frequent border crossing was associated with more fast food consumption and a greater reported diagnosis of high cholesterol. Understanding the extent to which border crossing is associated with obesigenic behaviors and chronic disease is important for developing relevant interventions along the border.

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