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Rockville, MD, United States

Rog D.J.,Westat | Marshall T.,Westat | Dougherty R.H.,DMA Inc | George P.,Westat | And 3 more authors.
Psychiatric Services | Year: 2014

Objectives: Permanent supportive housing provides safe, stable housing for people with mental and substance use disorders who are homeless or disabled. This article describes permanent supportive housing and reviews research. Methods: Authors reviewed individual studies and literature reviews from 1995 through 2012. Databases surveyed were PubMed, PsycINFO, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, Published International Literature on Traumatic Stress, the Educational Resources Information Center, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. The authors chose from three levels of evidence (high, moderate, and low) on the basis of benchmarks for the number of studies and quality of their methodology. They also described the evidence of service effectiveness. Results: The level of evidence for permanent supportive housing was graded as moderate. Substantial literature, including seven randomized controlled trials, demonstrated that components of the model reduced homelessness, increased housing tenure, and decreased emergency room visits and hospitalization. Consumers consistently rated this model more positively than other housing models. Methodological flaws limited the ability to draw firm conclusions. Results were stronger for studies that compared permanent supportive housing with treatment as usual or no housing rather than with other models. Conclusions: The moderate level of evidence indicates that permanent supportive housing is promising, but research is needed to clarify the model and determine the most effective elements for various subpopulations. Policy makers should consider including permanent supportive housing as a covered service for individuals with mental and substance use disorders. An evaluation component is needed to continue building its evidence base. Source


Martin M.R.,Review Centre | Kopstein A.,Samhsa Inc. | Janice J.M.,Tunnell Government Services
PLoS ONE | Year: 2010

There has been the impression amongst many observers that discussion of a grant application has little practical impact on the final priority scores. Rather the final score is largely dictated by the range of preliminary scores given by the assigned reviewers. The implication is that the preliminary and final scores are the same and the discussion has little impact. The purpose of this examination of the peer review process at the National Institutes of Health is to describe the relationship between preliminary priority scores of the assigned reviewers and the final priority score given by the scientific review group. This study also describes the practical importance of any differences in priority scores. Priority scores for a sample of standard (R01) research grant applications were used in this assessment. The results indicate that the preliminary meeting evaluation is positively correlated with the final meeting outcome but that they are on average significantly different. The results demonstrate that discussion at the meeting has an important practical impact on over 13% of the applications. Source


Marshall T.,Westat | Goldberg R.W.,Care Network | Braude L.,DMA Inc | Dougherty R.H.,DMA Inc | And 4 more authors.
Psychiatric Services | Year: 2014

Objective: Supported employment is a direct service with multiple components designed to help adults with mental disorders or co-occurring mental and substance use disorders choose, acquire, and maintain competitive employment. This article describes supported employment and assesses the evidence base for this service. Methods: Authors reviewed meta-analyses, research reviews, and individual studies from 1995 through 2012. Databases surveyed were PubMed, PsycINFO, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, Published International Literature on Traumatic Stress, the Educational Resources Information Center, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Authors chose fromthree levels of evidence (high, moderate, and low) based on benchmarks for the number of studies and quality of their methodology. They also described the evidence for service effectiveness. Results: The level of research evidence for supported employment was graded as high, based on 12 systematic reviews and 17 randomized controlled trials of the individual placement and support model. Supported employment consistently demonstrated positive outcomes for individuals with mental disorders, including higher rates of competitive employment, fewer days to the first competitive job, more hours and weeks worked, and higher wages. There was also strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of individual elements of the model. Conclusions: Substantial evidence demonstrates the effectiveness of supported employment. Policy makers should consider including it as a covered service. Future research is needed for subgroups such as young adults, older adults, people with primary substance use disorders, and those from various cultural, racial, and ethnic backgrounds. Source


Dougherty R.H.,DMA Inc | Lyman D.R.,DMA Inc | George P.,Westat | Ghose S.S.,Westat | And 2 more authors.
Psychiatric Services | Year: 2014

Health care reform offers the opportunity for federal and state agencies to work with private and nonprofit sectors to transform the American health care system through development of a comprehensive set of community-based, recovery-oriented, and evidence-based services for people with mental and substance use disorders. This Assessing the Evidence Base Series (AEB Series) provides science-supported information about selected mental health and substance abuse services for health care leaders as they implement new health benefit packages as a part of health care reform. Series authors conducted reviews of research on 14 behavioral health services: behavioral management for children and adolescents, trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy for children and adolescents, recovery housing, residential treatment for individuals with substance use disorders, peer support services for individuals with serious mental illnesses, peer recovery support for individuals with substance use disorders, permanent supportive housing, supported employment, substance abuse intensive outpatient programs, skill building, intensive case management, consumer and family psychoeducation, medication-assisted treatment with methadone, and medication-assisted treatment with buprenorphine. The goal of the AEB Series is to provide a framework for decision makers to build a modern addictions and mental health service systemfor the people who use these services and the people who provide them. The framework is intended to support decisions about the services that are likely to be most effective. This introduction to the AEB Series explains the methods used to conduct the reviews, rate the research evidence, and describe the effectiveness of the services. The rationale underlying recommendations for implementation of the services is also discussed, and suggestions are offered for future research. Source


Since 2002, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has awarded 30 grants through its Older Adults Mental Health Targeted Capacity Expansion (OA TCE) program. These grants are designed to increase, develop, and implement mental health services for individuals older than age 60 and to build infrastructure to support the service system using Evidence-Based Practices (EBPs). The most recent funding cycle awarded ten grants in 2008. These grants will fund projects for up to 3 years at approximately $400,000 per year. This article describes the OA TCE program and reviews SAMHSA's support of EBP through various other initiatives. © 2010 American Society on Aging. Source

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