Saint Vincent Hospital Zams

Zams, Austria

Saint Vincent Hospital Zams

Zams, Austria
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Svalheim S.,University of Oslo | Mushtaq U.,University of Oslo | Mochol M.,Ostfold County Hospital | Luef G.,Innsbruck Medical University | And 3 more authors.
Acta Neurologica Scandinavica | Year: 2013

Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate immunoglobulin levels in patients with epilepsy using the antiepileptic drugs (AED) levetiracetam (LEV), carbamazepine (CBZ), or lamotrigine (LTG). Methods: A total of 211 patients and 80 controls (age: 18-45 years) of both genders were included. The patients had been treated with either LEV (n = 47), CBZ (n = 90), or LTG (n = 74) monotherapy for at least 6 months. Total concentrations of immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgG subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4), immunoglobulin A (IgA), and immunoglobulin M (IgM) were measured. Smoking, drinking habits, and physical activity were recorded, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Results: A significantly lower total IgG and IgG1 was found in both men and women treated with LTG and in men on CBZ. IgG2 and IgG4 were also lower in LTG-treated women, and IgA and IgM were lower in LTG-treated men. Patients treated with LEV did not differ from the control group. Conclusions: Low levels of immunoglobulins were found in patients with epilepsy treated with LTG or CBZ. As our group of patients consisted of otherwise healthy young adults, one should be especially aware of a possible effect of AEDs on immunoglobulin levels when treating selected patient groups, for example immunocompromised patients. Immunoglobulin concentrations should be measured in patients treated with LTG or CBZ who experience recurrent infections, and a change in medication should be considered. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.


Ernst F.,Innsbruck Medical University | Ernst F.,Paracelsus Medical University | Rauchenzauner M.,Saint Vincent Hospital Zams | Rauchenzauner M.,Innsbruck Medical University | And 6 more authors.
Psychoneuroendocrinology | Year: 2014

Objectives: On-call duty (OCD) is frequently associated with health and safety risks for both physicians and patients. The lack of studies conducted in clinical care environments and the ongoing public dialogue concerning OCD led to a detailed investigation of a working schedule including sleep fragmentation and extended work hours. Design: Within-person randomized cross-over trial. Setting: Comparison of a 24. h on-call shift (OCD) compared to a routine working-day (non on call, NOC) in hospital. Participants: 30 residents and senior physicians of the Department of Internal Medicine, Neurology and Otorhinolaryngology at the University Hospital Innsbruck. Main outcome measures: Sleep variables, cognitive performance (Concentration-Endurance d2 test), emotional status (Eigenschaftswoerterliste 60S), serum-cortisol, urinary cortisol and noradrenaline, heart-rate variability, and saccadic eye movements were determined before and after OCD and NOC respectively. Results: Concentration-endurance performance was significantly reduced after OCD as compared to NOC by 16.4% (p<. 0.001). Changes in emotional status consisted in a reduction of subjective concentration and performance related activation after OCD by 17.4% (p<. 0.001) and 16.0% (p<. 0.001) respectively together with a 21.8% increase of general deactivation (p<. 0.001) and a 29.2% rise of fatigue (p<. 0.001). On the contrary, subjective activation and raised mood showed an 18.3% and 21.7% increase after OCD (p<. 0.01). Urinary noradrenaline excretion (46. μg/24. h, 19-97) was greater during OCD when compared to NOC (36. μg/24. h, 10-54, p<. 0.01). Sympathetic activity measured by heart rate variability was significantly higher during OCD in contrast to NOC (p<. 0.05). Serum-cortisol was lower in the morning after (132. ng/l, 60-273) than the morning before OCD (p<. 0.01). Finally, the number of short saccadic latencies was reduced after OCD (p<. 0.05) compared to NOC. Conclusions: 24. h OCD alters both, the sympathetic-adrenomedullary system as well as the hypothalamic pituitary-adrenocortical axis. Moreover, physicians' emotional state, cognitive and oculomotor performance seems to be influenced independently from sleep interruptions. The discrepancy between subjective feeling and objective cognitive impairments pose a risk for performing complex manual and cognitive tasks. Hence, our findings argue against an oversimplified interpretation of alterations in the physicians' psychoneuroendocrine structure in terms of impaired mood and neurocognitive deterioration combined with up-/dysregulated stress axes associated with OCD as a consequence of sleep deprivation. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Moser C.,University of Innsbruck | Zoderer D.,University of Innsbruck | Luef G.,University of Innsbruck | Rauchenzauner M.,Saint Vincent Hospital Zams | And 4 more authors.
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry | Year: 2012

Co-administration of synthetic progestin containing hormonal contraceptives (HCs) and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a common clinical situation which needs specific considerations due to drug interactions. Several studies have demonstrated that lamotrigine plasma levels are significantly decreased during co-medication with HCs, and that this interaction is associated with increased seizure frequency in most of the cases. Additionally, an increase in contraceptive failure and unintended pregnancy could be observed during comedication. Hence, monitoring of progestin plasma levels in patients with AED co-medication is of interest. A rapid and reliable online solid-phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (online SPE-LC-MS/MS) method using gradient elution in the LC domain was established and validated for the simultaneous quantitative determination of gestodene, dienogest, drospirenone, etonogestrel, cyproterone acetate, and levonorgestrel in human plasma. The online SPE-LC-MS/MS method covered a quantification concentration range of 5-100 ng/ml for dienogest, 1-100 ng/ml for etonogestrel and 2-100 ng/ml for all other analytes. Stable isotope-labeled internal standards were used for analyte quantification based on selected reaction monitoring experiments. Inter- and intra-assay precision and accuracy were determined from quality control (QC) samples at the lower limits of quantification and at low, medium, and high concentration levels within the calibration range. Inter-assay reproducibility at the QC levels was better than 10% (relative standard deviation, RSD), accuracy at these levels ranged from -3.7% to 11.3%. Total extraction efficiency, tested at three concentrations, ranged from 92.5% to 106.4%. Matrix interferences were excluded by post-column infusion experiments. To prove the applicability of the assay in clinical cohorts, a sample set (n= 298) stemming from study patients under AED/oral HC comedication was screened for progestin plasma levels. This method has to be considered a research-use-only assay and must not be used for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes, since it did not undergo formal performance evaluation in the sense of the IVD directive (98/79/EG) of the European Community. © Springer-Verlag 2011.


Rauchenzauner M.,Saint Vincent Hospital Zams | Roscia S.,Innsbruck Medical University | Prieschl M.,Innsbruck Medical University | Wildt L.,Innsbruck Medical University | And 7 more authors.
Neuropediatrics | Year: 2014

Objectives Although previous studies suggest that valproate (VPA) may induce reproductive endocrine disorders, the effects of newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on reproductive endocrine health have not been widely investigated and compared with those of older AEDs. Therefore, this multicenter cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of reproductive endocrine dysfunctions in pubertal females with epilepsy receiving VPA, lamotrigine (LTG), or levetiracetam (LEV) monotherapy. Patients and Methods Pubertal girls on VPA (n = 11), LTG (n = 8), or LEV (n = 13) monotherapy for at least 6 months were recruited. Healthy sex-matched and age-matched subjects were enrolled as controls (n = 32). Each participant underwent a comprehensive physical examination concerning signs of hyperandrogenism. The Ferriman-Gallwey score of hirsutism was assessed. In addition, all patients completed a standardized questionnaire regarding epilepsy, menstrual cycle, and hirsutism features. Adiposity indices were measured and weight gain was documented for each subject. Results Hirsutism score, occurrence of hyperandrogenism features, and adiposity indices were significantly higher in the VPA group when compared with LEV and control groups. VPA therapy was more frequently associated with weight gain when compared with LTG and controls, whereas no significant differences with regard to signs of hyperandrogenism were found between VPA and LTG groups. Furthermore, no differences in menstrual disorders were observed between groups. Conclusions Pubertal girls with epilepsy receiving VPA monotherapy were more likely to develop signs of hyperandrogenism, that is, hirsutism and acanthosis, than those on LEV or controls. However, no differences in occurrence of menstrual disorders and other reproductive dysfunctions were found between VPA, LTG, LEV, and control groups. These findings do not allow us to clearly determine whether or not VPA, LEV, and LTG monotherapies considerably affect reproductive endocrine health in pubertal girls with epilepsy. Therefore, further prospective studies of larger sample sizes are needed to establish if screening tests should be recommended. © 2014 Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.


Bokemeyer C.,University of Hamburg | Stein A.,University of Hamburg | Ridwelski K.,Stadtisches Klinikum Magdeburg | Atanackovic D.,University of Hamburg | And 6 more authors.
Gastric Cancer | Year: 2015

Background: Postoperative relapse rate after gastrectomy and perioperative chemotherapy remain high in patients with advanced gastric cancer due to the spread of disseminated tumour cells in the peritoneal cavity. Perioperative administration of catumaxomab could potentially eliminate residual tumour cells after intended curative resection of the primary tumour. Methods: This open-label, phase II study investigated the safety and efficacy of catumaxomab following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and subsequent surgery in patients with resectable (T2–4, N+, M0) gastric adenocarcinoma. Patients received catumaxomab intra- (single 10 μg dose) and postoperatively (10, 20, 50 and 150 μg on days 7, 10, 13 and 16, respectively). The primary endpoint was the postoperative complication rate (maximum rate defined as <62 %) within 30 days after surgery in patients who received at least the first catumaxomab dose. Results: Of 64 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 58 underwent surgery and 54 received at least the first catumaxomab dose. Postoperative complications were reported in 18 of 54 evaluable patients (complication rate 33 %; 95 % confidence interval: 21–48 %); thus, the primary endpoint was met. The most frequent complications were pulmonary infection (17 %) and anastomosis insufficiency requiring surgery (11 %). The most common catumaxomab-related adverse events were pyrexia (67 %), leucocytosis (19 %), abdominal pain (17 %) and chills (17 %). The 4-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 38 and 50 %. Conclusion: Intra- and postoperative administration of catumaxomab as part of a multimodal treatment approach was feasible and tolerable in patients with advanced gastric cancer and should be further investigated in a randomised trial. © 2014, The International Gastric Cancer Association and The Japanese Gastric Cancer Association.


Rauchenzauner M.,Saint Vincent Hospital Zams | Ehrensberger M.,Innsbruck Medical University | Prieschl M.,Innsbruck Medical University | Kapelari K.,Innsbruck Medical University | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Neurology | Year: 2013

This study investigates the impact of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) and antiepileptic drugs (AED) during pregnancy on gestational age (GA) and anthropometric data of newborns. One hundred twenty-nine singleton pregnancies resulting in live births from September 1999 to October 2010 in 106 women with epilepsy on AED therapy, recorded within the framework of the EURAP (International Registry of Antiepileptic Drugs and Pregnancy) program at the Department of Neurology, Medical University Innsbruck, Austria, were studied. Occurrence of ≥1 GTCS during pregnancy was associated with a shorter GA [median (range) 37.5 [35.1-41.6] vs. 39.7 [29.1-46.3] weeks; p ≤ 0.001], an overall five times higher preterm risk (p = 0.042) and a reduced birth weight in boys (2,900 [2,050-3,870] vs. 3,205 [1,575-4,355] g; p = 0.040). In primipara, when compared to multipara, GTCS ≥1 significantly reduced the GA (37.9 [35.1-41.6] vs. 39.7 [29.4-44.9] weeks; p = 0.020) and raised the incidence of low birth weight (LBW) (p = 0.022) in neonates. Antiepileptic drug polytherapy significantly increased the risk for small-for-gestational-age regarding weight (SGAW; p = 0.035) and regarding weight and/or length (SGA W/L; p = 0.046) when compared to monotherapy. GTCS during pregnancy was associated with diverse negative effects comprising shorter GA, an increased incidence of prematurity and LBW in primiparous women. Furthermore, AED polytherapy was correlated with an enhanced risk for SGA delivery. Re-evaluating the need for drug therapy (in particular polytherapy), maintaining seizure control for a given period before pregnancy and counseling about the importance of preventing GTCS might improve pregnancy outcome in women with epilepsy. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


Rauchenzauner M.,Saint Vincent Hospital Zams | Laimer M.,Innsbruck Medical University | Wiedmann M.,Innsbruck Medical University | Tschoner A.,Innsbruck Medical University | And 6 more authors.
Epilepsy Research | Year: 2013

Valproic acid (VPA), as one of the most widely prescribed antiepileptic drugs (AED) for many types of epilepsy in adults and children, is associated with weight gain, alteration of adipocytokine homeostasis, insulin resistance and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD). Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are considered as important new targets in modern type 2 diabetes mellitus therapy linked to insulin resistance, NAFLD and visceral obesity acting via peripheral or central mechanisms. We herein demonstrate the lack of an influence of VPA treatment on RBP4 and GLP-1 in otherwise healthy patients. In summary, the absence of any relationship with RBP4 and GLP-1 concentrations does not suggest a role of these novel insulin resistance parameters as potential regulators of glucose and fat metabolism during VPA-therapy. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Saint Vincent Hospital Zams
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Expert review of neurotherapeutics | Year: 2011

Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), a new voltage-gated sodium channel blocker that is chemically related to carbamazepine and partially metabolized to oxcarbazepine, has attracted attention as results of previous Phase II and III studies demonstrated and confirmed efficacy and tolerability of ESL 800 and 1200 mg once daily as add-on therapy for adult patients with drug-resistant partial-onset seizures. In children, efficacy data point towards a dose-dependent decrease in seizure frequency and tolerability analyses showed a low incidence of mild drug-related adverse effects at 5 and 15 mg/kg/day. The most frequently reported adverse effects were dizziness, somnolence, headache, diplopia, nausea and vomiting. The convenience of once-daily dosing and a short/simple titration regimen in combination with a comparative efficacy and tolerability profile might promote ESL as a valid alternative to the current adjunctive antiepileptic drug therapy armamentarium for drug-resistant partial seizures in adults. Since clinical trials in children and adolescents on ESL efficacy and safety are ongoing and data already published are far from conclusive, the therapeutic value of ESL in this special population has to be established in the near future.


PubMed | County Hospital Natters, General Hospital, Saint Vincent Hospital Zams, County Hospital Kufstein and Innsbruck Medical University
Type: Clinical Trial, Phase II | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Different strategies for neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with early stage NSCLC have already been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of a chemoimmunotherapy when limited to two cycles.Between 01/2007 and 03/2010 41 patients with primarily resectable NSCLC stage IB to IIIA were included. Treatment consisted of two cycles cisplatin (40 mg/m2 d1+2) and docetaxel (75 mg/m2 d1) q3 weeks, accompanied by the administration of cetuximab (400 mg/m2 d1, then 250 mg weekly). The primary endpoint was radiological response according to RECIST.40 patients were evaluable for toxicity, 39 for response. The main grade 3/4 toxicities were: neutropenia 25%, leucopenia 11%, febrile neutropenia 6%, nausea 8% and rash 8%. 20 patients achieved a partial response, 17 a stable disease, 2 were not evaluable. 37 patients (95%) underwent surgery and in three of them a complete pathological response was achieved. At a median follow-up of 44.2 months, 41% of the patients had died, median progression-free survival was 22.5 months.Two cycles of cisplatin/ docetaxel/ cetuximab showed promising efficacy in the neoadjuvant treatment of early-stage NSCLC and rapid operation was possible in 95% of patients. Toxicities were manageable and as expected.EU Clinical Trials Register; Eudract-Nr: 2006-004639-31.


PubMed | Saint Vincent Hospital Zams
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of neurology | Year: 2013

This study investigates the impact of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) and antiepileptic drugs (AED) during pregnancy on gestational age (GA) and anthropometric data of newborns. One hundred twenty-nine singleton pregnancies resulting in live births from September 1999 to October 2010 in 106 women with epilepsy on AED therapy, recorded within the framework of the EURAP (International Registry of Antiepileptic Drugs and Pregnancy) program at the Department of Neurology, Medical University Innsbruck, Austria, were studied. Occurrence of 1 GTCS during pregnancy was associated with a shorter GA [median (range) 37.5 [35.1-41.6] vs. 39.7 [29.1-46.3] weeks; p 0.001], an overall five times higher preterm risk (p = 0.042) and a reduced birth weight in boys (2,900 [2,050-3,870] vs. 3,205 [1,575-4,355] g; p = 0.040). In primipara, when compared to multipara, GTCS 1 significantly reduced the GA (37.9 [35.1-41.6] vs. 39.7 [29.4-44.9] weeks; p = 0.020) and raised the incidence of low birth weight (LBW) (p = 0.022) in neonates. Antiepileptic drug polytherapy significantly increased the risk for small-for-gestational-age regarding weight (SGA(W); p = 0.035) and regarding weight and/or length (SGA(W/L); p = 0.046) when compared to monotherapy. GTCS during pregnancy was associated with diverse negative effects comprising shorter GA, an increased incidence of prematurity and LBW in primiparous women. Furthermore, AED polytherapy was correlated with an enhanced risk for SGA delivery. Re-evaluating the need for drug therapy (in particular polytherapy), maintaining seizure control for a given period before pregnancy and counseling about the importance of preventing GTCS might improve pregnancy outcome in women with epilepsy.

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