Sainsburys Supermarkets Ltd

London, United Kingdom

Sainsburys Supermarkets Ltd

London, United Kingdom
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Jones A.C.,Bangor University | Mead A.,Plymouth Marine Laboratory | Kaiser M.J.,Bangor University | Austen M.C.V.,Plymouth Marine Laboratory | And 46 more authors.
Fish and Fisheries | Year: 2015

Aquaculture is currently the fastest expanding global animal food production sector and is a key future contributor to food security. An increase in food security will be dependent upon the development and improvement of sustainable practices. A prioritization exercise was undertaken, focusing on the future knowledge needs to underpin UK sustainable aquaculture (both domestic and imported products) using a 'task force' group of 36 'practitioners' and 12 'research scientists' who have an active interest in sustainable aquaculture. A long list of 264 knowledge needs related to sustainable aquaculture was developed in conjunction with the task force. The long list was further refined through a three stage process of voting and scoring, including discussions of each knowledge need. The top 25 knowledge needs are presented, as scored separately by 'practitioners' or 'research scientists'. There was similar agreement in priorities identified by these two groups. The priority knowledge needs will provide guidance to structure ongoing work to make science accessible to practitioners and help to prioritize future science policy needs and funding. The process of knowledge exchange, and the mechanisms by which this can be achieved, effectively emerged as the top priority for sustainable aquaculture. Viable alternatives to wild fish-based aquaculture feeds, resource constraints that will potentially limit expansion of aquaculture, sustainable offshore aquaculture and the treatment of sea lice also emerged as strong priorities. Although the exercise was focused on UK needs for sustainable aquaculture, many of the emergent issues are considered to have global application. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Leiper A.,Greenfield Energy | Skelton J.,Sainsburys Supermarkets Ltd | Rivers N.,Greenfield Energy | Zaynulin D.,Greenfield Energy
Refrigeration Science and Technology | Year: 2014

The comparatively low critical point (31.1°C) of CO2 (R744) when compared with more conventional refrigerants can make CO2 refrigeration systems inefficient. Above this point, the discharge CO2 refrigerant does not condense and the system operates transcritically. With no condensation and none of the latent heat associated with the phase change, systems must rely on sensible heat rejection. As such, systems operating transcritically have a lower capacity to reject heat and can be less efficient. In climates where ambient temperatures surpass 20-23°C, transcritical operation is often unavoidable and CO2 systems are not seeing the same successes as in colder climes. Maintaining subcritical operation when ambient temperatures are above the transcritical threshold requires an additional cooling medium other than air. One such alternative cooling medium can be provided by coupling the high pressure side of the CO2 refrigeration system to the ground with an aqueous loop. The fluid in this loop is circulated through a network of subsurface borehole heat exchangers and then to heat pumps to supply space heating and domestic hot water and subsequently a plate heat exchanger installed in the heat rejection side of the refrigeration cycle. Since ground temperatures are typically lower than ambient temperatures during the summer, subcritical cycle operation can be realised more often and vast improvements to coefficient of performance can be achieved. This paper presents data collected at two supermarkets, the first utilising ground coupling and the second using a typical air cooled refrigeration cycle. The paper describes the effect of the technology on the operation of a CO2 refrigeration system and results show that geo-coupling lowers condensing temperatures, providing a reduction in energy consumption of around 25% and helping to prevent transcritical operation. This improves pack reliability and opens up opportunities for CO2 in warmer climes.


Acha S.,Imperial College London | Shah N.,Imperial College London | Ashford J.,Sainsburys Supermarkets Ltd | Penfold D.,Sainsburys Supermarkets Ltd
Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization and Simulation of Energy Conversion Systems and Processes, ECOS 2012 | Year: 2012

Electricity consumption in the UK commercial sector accounts for 19% of total annual electricity demand. This implies any step taken towards energy efficiency applications for commercial buildings can generate important reductions in both energy use and carbon emissions. Sainsbury's supermarkets, one of the UKs largest grocers, recognises the challenges climate change brings to businesses and hence is conducting efforts to reduce the operational carbon footprint of their stores. Lighting in stores is an essential service and is an important component of a stores power demand; ranging from 15 to 35% based on design features. This paper details the innovative lighting control application Sainsbury's is currently employing in its new stores with the objective to maximise the benefits digital dimmable technology possesses. Basic lighting concepts are described which explain the priorities supermarkets have when using this service, while the tradeoffs of using digital signal interface (DSI) controls are also discussed. The non-linear relationship between DSI settings, lux drawn from ballasts, and power consumed by the system are showcased as a proper understanding of this concept is paramount in achieving energy savings. In addition, using a Sainsbury's 3,300 m2 eco-store, a thorough case study is presented in which various lighting strategy settings are applied; having very attractive results in monetary, energy, and environmental metrics without being detrimental to the shopping experience. Hence, it is proven digital dimmable technology controls can effectively provide 20 to 25% savings in lighting services if sensors and settings are established properly. Furthermore, due to the robust and fast response capability digital dimming offers, the authors argue this technology is suitable for demand side management applications that can greatly benefit the operability of the grid and as a consequence provide an additional revenue stream for businesses in a smart-grid environment.


Watson R.,Sainsburys Supermarkets Ltd
Nutrition Bulletin | Year: 2013

Food allergy presents a unique food safety issue, as while allergy affects a relatively small proportion of the UK population, consuming foods containing even minute quantities of a food allergen can have very serious consequences. New European Union (EU) legislation [Regulation (EU) No. 1169/2011 on the provision of food information to consumers], with which manufacturers and retailers have until December 2014 to comply, requires allergens to be highlighted in the ingredients list on all pre-packed food, rather than within an allergy box or statement. Allergy boxes and statements may still be used to signpost consumers to the allergen information within the ingredients list and to highlight cross-contamination risk. These changes in allergen labelling must be effectively and consistently communicated so that allergy information is not overlooked by consumers. There is ongoing research to develop allergen thresholds or 'no adverse effect levels' for use in food safety risk assessment, with a view to reducing the number of 'may contain' allergen warnings on food packaging. This would be welcomed by UK consumers who have been found to find this type of allergen labelling frustrating, owing to its widespread use and ambiguity in meaning. However, more robust data are required before allergen thresholds can be widely implemented in food production. Sainsbury's has a 20×20 sustainability commitment to be the number 1 retailer in the UK for customers with allergies and intolerances. One way in which Sainsbury's aims to deliver on this pledge is by removing unnecessary and unexpected allergens from own brand food and by removing unnecessary cross-contamination warnings (i.e. unnecessary 'may contain' type labelling). Sainsbury's also recognises that retailers and manufacturers have a responsibility to reliably inform consumers of the nature and composition of their food, as well as having appropriate allergen management strategies and policies in place, as consumers rely heavily on retailers and manufacturers to provide safe, accurate labelling so that they can effectively manage the allergens in the foods they purchase. © 2013 British Nutrition Foundation.


Patent
Sainsburys Supermarkets Ltd. | Date: 2013-01-30

The invention relates to a computer system located at a retail premises for executing a point of sale transaction comprising: a point of sale terminal having an interface for receiving product data from at least one product purchased by a customer, the product data including a first price for the product; a processor arranged to execute a computer program which receives from the point of sale terminal first price data including at least said first price and second price data pertaining to the product, the second price data being from a remote source, compares the first price data with the second price data and issues a voucher request based on the comparison of the first and second price data; and a voucher issuing unit arranged to receive the voucher request and to automatically provide a voucher to the customer responsive to the voucher request.


Patent
Sainsburys Supermarkets Ltd. | Date: 2014-07-23

The invention relates to a server for supporting a point of sale transaction, the server comprising: an input for receiving from a point of sale terminal transaction details pertaining to a customer and a second input for receiving update information from an update service; a processing engine arranged to receive the transaction details wherein the transaction details include product data from at least one product, the product data including first price data, including at least a first price for the product, wherein the processing engine is configured to receive second price data from the update information, the second price data pertaining to the at least one product and to compare the first price data with the second price data and issues a voucher request based on the comparison; an update component configured to issue periodic polling messages, and responsive to at least some of said polling messages to receive said update information at the second input, wherein the update information includes at least one of a price file containing the second price data and a configuration file containing configuration parameters for controlling operation of the processing engine.


This project brings together the University of Leeds and Grantham Institute with commercial developers from BioCarbon Tracker and ESRI UK to provide Sainsbury’s with insights into site-specific, multi-parameter environmental risk profiles, both for now and for future forecasting. Risk profiles will combine three categories of data: multiple layers of geospatial data for environmental conditions; combined with crop models and production conditions (to predict performance); and linked to corporate data (such as supplier locations, supply chains, procurement volumes). Outputs from geoprocess models will indicate risks - by type and location - that affect product quality, availability or cost and allow model-based analysis of sustainability and risk. Within the project, ArcGIS Online will be used to share findings with Sainsbury’s suppliers for specific sites, which will be validated with growers’ direct experiences. The development of this system will provide insights to Sainsbury’s and its vast network of suppliers to make them more competitive in the global market. Insights will ultimately inform investment decisions and contractual arrangements to shape supply chains of the future.


Patent
Sainsburys Supermarkets Ltd. | Date: 2015-07-17

A server supporting a point of sale transaction includes an input for receiving from a point of sale terminal transaction details for a customer and a second input for receiving update information from an update service; a processing engine receiving the transaction details which include product data from a product including first price data including a price for the product, the processing engine receiving second price data from the update information, the second price data pertaining to the product, comparing the first price data with the second price data and issuing a voucher request based on the comparison; an update component issuing periodic polling messages, and responsive to the polling messages receiving the update information at the second input, the update information including one of a price file containing the second price data and a configuration file containing configuration parameters for controlling operation of the processing engine.


Patent
Sainsburys Supermarkets Ltd. | Date: 2015-03-23

A computer system is located at a retail premises for executing a point of sale transaction comprising: a point of sale terminal having an interface for receiving product data from at least one product purchased by a customer, the product data including a first price for the product; a processor arranged to execute a computer program which receives from the point of sale terminal first price data including at least said first price and second price data pertaining to the product, the second price data being from a remote source, compares the first price data with the second price data and issues a voucher request based on the comparison of the first and second price data; and a voucher issuing unit arranged to receive the voucher request and to automatically provide a voucher to the customer responsive to the voucher request.


Patent
Sainsburys Supermarkets Ltd. | Date: 2011-10-31

A computer system is located at a retail premises for executing a point of sale transaction comprising: a point of sale terminal having an interface for receiving product data from at least one product purchased by a customer, the product data including a first price for the product; a processor arranged to execute a computer program which receives from the point of sale terminal first price data including at least said first price and second price data pertaining to the product, the second price data being from a remote source, compares the first price data with the second price data and issues a voucher request based on the comparison of the first and second price data; and a voucher issuing unit arranged to receive the voucher request and to automatically provide a voucher to the customer responsive to the voucher request.

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