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Shruti A.,Sai institute of paramedical and allied science | Kumar V.S.,Sai institute of paramedical and allied science | Kumar S.S.,SBS PG Institute of Biomedical Science and Research | Prasad S.K.,Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology
Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research | Year: 2011

Natural ecosystems are directly dependent on beneficial microorganisms present in the rhizosphere for soil health and plant productivity. Plant growth promoting bacteria were isolated from soil of central and upper Himalayan region with a view to screen/evaluate their phylogenetic relationship among the isolates by using amplified Restriction DNA Analysis (ARDRA).


Mathur A.,National Institute of Malaria Research | Verma S.K.,Sai Institute of Paramedical and Allied science | Yousuf S.,Sai Institute of Paramedical and Allied science | Singh S.K.,Sai Institute of Paramedical and Allied science | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Pharma and Bio Sciences | Year: 2011

Antimicrobial activity of various extracts of roots (200mg/ml) of Ricinus communis were screened against pathogenic microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger using well diffusion method. Aqueous extracts don't show any significant antimicrobial properties. The hexane and methanol extracts revealed maximum antimicrobial activity (p<0.0001). These findings established the potential of the roots of Ricinus communis as an effective antimicrobial agent. However, further studies are needed to evaluate active compounds and probable medicinal benefits in chemotherapy among humans.


Mathur A.,Sai Institute of Paramedical and Allied science | Bhat R.,Sai Institute of Paramedical and Allied science | Prasad G.B.K.S.,Jiwaji University | Dua V.K.,Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd. | And 2 more authors.
Rasayan Journal of Chemistry | Year: 2010

The antimicrobial activity and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of various plant extracts in different solvents such as ethanol (98%), hexane (99%) and distilled water of plants traditionally used as medicines as Bidens pilosa L., Bixa orellana L., Cecropia peltata L., Cinchona officinalis L., Gliricidia sepium, Jacaranda mimosifolia, Justica secunda Vahl., Piper pulchrum, P. paniculata L. and Spilanthes americana were evaluated against five bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus β hemolytic, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and fungus Candidia albicans. These plants are used in Indian folk medicine to treat infections of microbial origin. © 2010 RASĀYAN. All rights reserved.

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