SAGES

United States
United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Campbell T.C.,SAGES | Hodanics C.J.,OE | Mistry Z.S.,OE | Poku A.M.,OE | And 7 more authors.
Johns Hopkins APL Technical Digest (Applied Physics Laboratory) | Year: 2014

Electronic biosurveillance systems can improve the timeliness of public health data collection, aid in the early detection of disease outbreaks, and enhance situational awareness. As part of the Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) program, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) developed an open-source software tool called OpenESSENCE. OpenESSENCE provides "out-of-the-box" web-based data entry, analysis, and reporting that may significantly improve global disease surveillance, including surveillance in a wide range of resource-limited settings. Local health clinics have recognized that this new technology may help their countries comply with the World Health Organization revised International Health Regulations (IHR 2005) and prevent or mitigate disease outbreaks. This article briefly reviews OpenESSENCE and describes updates made during the last 2 years. © 2014 by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.


Farrell T.M.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | Bergman S.,McGill University | Selim N.,University of Kansas Medical Center | Harzman A.E.,Ohio State University | And 4 more authors.
Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques | Year: 2013

Background: In an effort to fulfill its charge to develop and maintain a comprehensive educational program to serve the members of the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES), the SAGES Continuing Education Committee (CEC) reports a summary of findings related to its evaluation of the 2012 SAGES annual meeting. Methods: All attendees to the 2012 annual meeting had the opportunity to complete an immediate postmeeting questionnaire as part of their continuing medical education (CME) certification in which they identified up to two learning themes, answered questions related to potential practice change items that are based on those learning themes, and complete a needs assessment related to important learning topics for future meetings. In addition, participants in the postgraduate and hands-on courses were asked to complete questions about case volume and comfort levels related to procedures/topics in those courses. All respondents to this initial survey were sent a 3-month follow-up questionnaire in which they were asked how successfully they had implemented the intended practice changes and what, if any, barriers they encountered. Postgraduate and hands-on course participants completed case volume and comfort level questions. Descriptive statistical analysis of this deidentified data was undertaken. Results: Response rates were 42 % and 56 % for CME-eligible attendees/respondents for the immediate postmeeting and 3-month follow-up questionnaires, respectively. Top learning themes for respondents were Bariatric, Hernia, Foregut, and Colorectal. Improving minimally invasive surgical (MIS) technique and managing complications related to MIS procedures were top intended practice changes. Partial implementation was common with top barriers including cost restrictions, lack of institutional support, and lack of time. Conclusions: The 2012 annual meeting analysis provides insight into educational needs among respondents and will help with planning content for future meetings. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Practicing surgeons commonly learn new procedures and techniques by attending a hands-on course, though trainings are often ineffective at promoting subsequent procedure adoption in practice. We describe implementation of a new program with the SAGES All Things Hernia Hands-On Course, Acquisition of Data for Outcomes and Procedure Transfer (ADOPT), which employs standardized, proven teaching techniques, and 1-year mentorship. Attendee confidence and procedure adoption are compared between standard and ADOPT programs.For the pilot ADOPT course implementation, a hands-on course focusing on abdominal wall hernia repair was chosen. ADOPT participants were recruited among enrollees for the standard Hands-On Hernia Course. Enrollment in ADOPT was capped at 10 participants and limited to a 2:1 student-to-faculty ratio, compared to thestandard course 22 participants with a 4:1 student-to-faculty ratio. ADOPT mentors interacted with participants through webinars, phone conferences, and continuous email availability throughout the year. All participants were asked to provide pre- and post-course surveys inquiring about the number of targeted hernia procedures performed and related confidence level.Four of 10 ADOPT participants (40%) and six of 22 standard training participants (27%) returned questionnaires. Over the 3months following the course, ADOPT participants performed more ventral hernia mesh insertion procedures than standard training participants (median 13 vs. 0.5, p=0.010) and considerably more total combined procedures (median 26 vs. 7, p=0.054). Compared to standard training, learners who participated in ADOPT reported greater confidence improvements in employing a components separation via an open approach (p=0.051), and performing an open transversus abdominis release, though the difference did not achieve statistical significance (p=0.14).These results suggest that the ADOPT program, with standardized and structured teaching, telementoring, and a longitudinal educational approach, is effective and leads to better transfer of learned skills and procedures to clinical practice.


Smith C.D.,SAGES | MacFadyen B.V.,Georgia Regents University
Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques | Year: 2010

Congress and others have called into question the propriety of relationships between professional medical associations (PMAs) and industry. These relationships are critical to the continued development of new and better devices and procedures for patients. Better guidelines are needed to help guide these relationships. Overrestrictive regulatory oversight risks overconstraint of these relationships and hindrance to medical progress. Copyright © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Feighner B.H.,SAGES | Campbell T.C.,SAGES | Katz A.T.,Bio Threat Awareness Systems Group | Wojcik R.A.,Bio Threat Awareness Systems Group | And 4 more authors.
Johns Hopkins APL Technical Digest (Applied Physics Laboratory) | Year: 2014

Disease surveillance, the foundation of public health practice, is undergoing a revolution driven by advances in information technology. The past 15 years have seen vast improvements in the collection, analysis, visualization, and reporting of public health data. Resource-limited countries have lagged behind because of challenges in information technology infrastructure and public health resources. The Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) is a collection of modular, open-source software tools designed to meet the challenges of electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings. Individual SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability. This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system. The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations. © 2014 by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.


Sanchez A.,SAGES | Sanchez A.,Central University of Venezuela | Rodriguez O.,Central University of Venezuela | Davila H.,Central University of Venezuela | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Robotic Surgery | Year: 2011

We present a case of a 32-year-old female patient with the diagnosis of gallstone disease and choledocholithiasis. Prior to in vivo surgery, we practiced the critical steps of the procedure using a proposed inert training model. We performed a robot-assisted laparoscopic common bile duct exploration, obtaining one stone. The operating time was 140 min (console time: 120 min) with no complications during the procedure. The patient was discharged 2 days after the operation. Robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery of the common bile duct is a safe and effective procedure and seems to have some benefits over conventional laparoscopic surgery. © 2010 Springer-Verlag London Ltd.


PubMed | Central University of Venezuela and SAGES
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of robotic surgery | Year: 2016

We present a case of a 32-year-old female patient with the diagnosis of gallstone disease and choledocholithiasis. Prior to in vivo surgery, we practiced the critical steps of the procedure using a proposed inert training model. We performed a robot-assisted laparoscopic common bile duct exploration, obtaining one stone. The operating time was 140min (console time: 120min) with no complications during the procedure. The patient was discharged 2days after the operation. Robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery of the common bile duct is a safe and effective procedure and seems to have some benefits over conventional laparoscopic surgery.


Campbell T.C.,SAGES | Mistry Z.S.,RDD application | Gorelick-Feldman G.N.,RDD application | Hodanics C.J.,RDD application | And 2 more authors.
Johns Hopkins APL Technical Digest (Applied Physics Laboratory) | Year: 2014

After the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, the Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System, a division of the U.S. Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center (AFHSC-GEIS), asked the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) to develop a system that would allow for easier collection and visualization of respiratory disease data collected from their worldwide laboratories. As part of the Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) program, APL developed the Respiratory Disease Dashboard (RDD) as a secure Internet-accessible database with user-friendly entry, analysis, and visualization of infectious disease laboratory data. Global AFHSC-GEIS laboratories, as well as other partner laboratories in various countries, use RDD to submit their weekly respiratory disease laboratory data to AFHSCGEIS; RDD also serves as their central repository for these data. © 2014 by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.

Loading SAGES collaborators
Loading SAGES collaborators