Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Austin, TX, United States

Joyce J.,Sage Environmental Consulting
American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers, AFPM - Environmental Conference 2015 | Year: 2015

EPA's NSPS Ja Rule which affects almost all refineries in the U.S. is a perplexing Rule on many fronts, but in particular because it does not clearly distinguish whether flare gas volume, mass, or flare emission compliance data is to be reported on a wet or dry basis. Therefore, when a refinery is confronted with how to comply with Ja flare gas emission limits such as the 162 ppmv H2S limit, or 500 lb/day SO2 mass limit, or the 500,000 scf (above baseline) flare gas volume limit, is it a wet or dry basis? Flare gas mass flow meters and Total Sulfur analyzers all produce wet basis data. Depending on how well a flare knockout drum or water seal is functioning, refinery flare gas may contain anywhere from 0% to as high as 20% moisture content in some circumstances. If you are considering costly on-line moisture analyzers or TDLAS (Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Spectroscopy) systems for flare gas moisture measurement, there may be a viable alternative to determine moisture content and at virtually no cost. Sage Environmental Consulting has developed a unique empirical algorithm that can determine flare gas moisture content and which can be programmed into the refinery flare data acquisition system. The algorithm accurately determines moisture content with only a few simple input parameters and has been lab tested with accuracy comparable to TDLAS systems. So why spend up to $100,000 per flare on costly moisture analyzers or TDL's when a low cost alternative may be a viable option. Source


Borgianini V.,Sage Environmental Consulting
Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA | Year: 2012

Case studies are presented where field observed floating roof fitting counts were found to differ from the counts used to historically calculate permit allowable and actual emissions. These differences, combined with improper controls or operational errors, had a considerable impact on emissions. The condition of the fittings and the impacts on emissions are presented. During visual field inspections performed on external floating roof tanks at two facilities, inaccuracies were found in the number of fittings and the types of controls used. Issues were also observed with the condition and operation of some of the fittings or controls. Improper controls, inaccurate fitting counts, and/or operational errors can have unfavorable consequences. Improper controls can trigger state and/or federal penalties. Inaccurate fitting counts can significantly affect tank emissions estimates and can also lead to regulatory penalties. Improper operation can lead to emission events, inaccurate emissions calculations and regulatory deviations. Recommended protocols for performing accurate field fitting counts and improving fitting integrity are also presented. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 105th AWMA Annual Conference and Exhibition (San Antonio, TX 6/19-22/2012). Source


Herman Holm K.,Sage Environmental Consulting
Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA | Year: 2012

The New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) Subpart Ja (Standards of Performance for Petroleum Refineries for Which Construction, Reconstruction, or Modifcation Commenced After May 14, 2007), issued by the EPA was first proposed on 5/14/2007, with flare requirements being added in the 6/24/2008 amendments. The flare portions of the rule were retained, until the EPA promulgated the final NSPS on 9/12/2012. NSPS Ja made flares a separate affected facility and included work practice standards specifically for flares, including monitoring requirements, the requirement to have a Flare Management Plan, and the requirement to perform Root Cause Analyses (RCAs). In addition to NSPS Ja, the EPA has also indicated increased interest in flares, especially the monitoring and control, with regards to good air pollution control practices. A discussion covers the new NSPS Ja and its implications for refinery flares. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 106th AWMA Annual Conference and Exhibition (Chicago, IL 6/25-28/2013). Source


Boley T.M.,Sage Environmental Consulting
Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA | Year: 2012

A discussion covers 2012 and 2013 Flare Consent Decrees (CD) and Consent Agreement and Final Order (CAFO) issued by the EPA in response to alleged flare over-steaming practices in most industrial applications; the impact of over-steaming on the subsequent degradation of combustion efficiency; and recent flare assessment activities reviewed by Sage Environmental. A comparison of flare CD and CAFO is also presented. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 106th AWMA Annual Conference and Exhibition (Chicago, IL 6/25-28/2013). Source


Joyce J.M.,Sage Environmental Consulting
2013 PEERS Conference, Co-located with the 2013 International Bioenergy and Bioproducts Conference | Year: 2013

The combustion air pre-heater (APH) in any boiler or process heater system is a critical operational component of the overall steam and power system, but one that is often under-maintained and often over-looked with regard to improving boiler performance. Regardless ifthe boiler is a solid, liquid, or gaseous fuel boiler, or even a pulp mill recovery boiler, combustion air pre-heater and combustion zone temperature directly correlate to boiler efficiency, and the generation of CO as well as PM emissions with only a minimal potential increase in NOx. This multi-year study presents the data, analysis, and facts to support the idea that every 15-20° F improvement in pre-heater temperature can and does correspond to a 2% to 2.5% improvement in boiler efficiency along with a larger corresponding decrease in boiler air emissions. This is an issue relevant for those facilities looking for positive, cost effective, and innovative solutions to Boiler MACT and NOx RACT compliance. Copyright © (2013) by the TAPPI Press. Source

Discover hidden collaborations