Saatzucht Dr. Hege GbR Domane Hohebuch

Waldenburg, Germany

Saatzucht Dr. Hege GbR Domane Hohebuch

Waldenburg, Germany
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Wurschum T.,University of Hohenheim | Liu W.,China Agricultural University | Busemeyer L.,Osnabruck University of Applied Sciences | Tucker M.R.,University of Adelaide | And 5 more authors.
BMC Genetics | Year: 2014

Background: Plant height is a prime example of a dynamic trait that changes constantly throughout adult development. In this study we utilised a large triticale mapping population, comprising 647 doubled haploid lines derived from 4 families, to phenotype for plant height by a precision phenotyping platform at multiple time points.Results: Using multiple-line cross QTL mapping we identified main effect and epistatic QTL for plant height for each of the time points. Interestingly, some QTL were detected at all time points whereas others were specific to particular developmental stages. Furthermore, the contribution of the QTL to the genotypic variance of plant height also varied with time as exemplified by a major QTL identified on chromosome 6A.Conclusions: Taken together, our results in the small grain cereal triticale reveal the importance of considering temporal genetic patterns in the regulation of complex traits such as plant height. © 2014 Würschum et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Alheit K.V.,University of Hohenheim | Reif J.C.,University of Hohenheim | Maurer H.P.,University of Hohenheim | Hahn V.,University of Hohenheim | And 3 more authors.
BMC Genomics | Year: 2011

Background: Triticale is adapted to a wide range of abiotic stress conditions, is an important high-quality feed stock and produces similar grain yield but more biomass compared to other crops. Modern genomic approaches aimed at enhancing breeding progress in cereals require high-quality genetic linkage maps. Consensus maps are genetic maps that are created by a joint analysis of the data from several segregating populations and different approaches are available for their construction. The phenomenon that alleles at a locus deviate from the Mendelian expectation has been defined as segregation distortion. The study of segregation distortion is of particular interest in doubled haploid (DH) populations due to the selection pressure exerted on the plants during the process of their establishment.Results: The final consensus map, constructed out of six segregating populations derived from nine parental lines, incorporated 2555 DArT markers mapped to 2602 loci (1929 unique). The map spanned 2309.9 cM with an average number of 123.9 loci per chromosome and an average marker density of one unique locus every 1.2 cM. The R genome showed the highest marker coverage followed by the B genome and the A genome. In general, locus order was well maintained between the consensus linkage map and the component maps. However, we observed several groups of loci for which the colinearity was slightly uneven. Among the 2602 loci mapped on the consensus map, 886 showed distorted segregation in at least one of the individual mapping populations. In several DH populations derived by androgenesis, we found chromosomes (2B, 3B, 1R, 2R, 4R and 7R) containing regions where markers exhibited a distorted segregation pattern. In addition, we observed evidence for segregation distortion between pairs of loci caused either by a predominance of parental or recombinant genotypes.Conclusions: We have constructed a reliable, high-density DArT marker consensus genetic linkage map as a basis for genomic approaches in triticale research and breeding, for example for multiple-line cross QTL mapping experiments. The results of our study exemplify the tremendous impact of different DH production techniques on allele frequencies and segregation distortion covering whole chromosomes. © 2011 Alheit et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Liu W.,China Agricultural University | Maurer H.P.,University of Hohenheim | Li G.,China Agricultural University | Tucker M.R.,University of Adelaide | And 4 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Abiotic stress experienced by autumn-sown crops during winter is of great economic importance as it can have a severe negative impact on yield. In this study, we investigated the genetic architecture of winter hardiness and frost tolerance in triticale. To this end, we used a large mapping population of 647 DH lines phenotyped for both traits in combination with genome-wide marker data. Employing multiple-line cross QTL mapping, we identified nine main effect QTL for winter hardiness and frost tolerance of which six were overlapping between both traits. Three major QTL were identified on chromosomes 5A, 1B and 5R. In addition, an epistasis scan revealed the contribution of epistasis to the genetic architecture of winter hardiness and frost tolerance in triticale. Taken together, our results show that winter hardiness and frost tolerance are complex traits that can be improved by phenotypic selection, but also that genomic approaches hold potential for a knowledge-based improvement of these important traits in elite triticale germplasm. © 2014 Liu et al.


Alheit K.V.,University of Hohenheim | Busemeyer L.,Osnabruck University of Applied Sciences | Liu W.,China Agricultural University | Maurer H.P.,University of Hohenheim | And 6 more authors.
Theoretical and Applied Genetics | Year: 2014

Key message: QTL mapping in multiple families identifies trait-specific and pleiotropic QTL for biomass yield and plant height in triticale. Triticale shows a broad genetic variation for biomass yield which is of interest for a range of purposes, including bioenergy. Plant height is a major contributor to biomass yield and in this study, we investigated the genetic architecture underlying biomass yield and plant height by multiple-line cross QTL mapping. We employed 647 doubled haploid lines from four mapping populations that have been evaluated in four environments and genotyped with 1710 DArT markers. Twelve QTL were identified for plant height and nine for biomass yield which cross-validated explained 59.6 and 38.2 % of the genotypic variance, respectively. A major QTL for both traits was identified on chromosome 5R which likely corresponds to the dominant dwarfing gene Ddw1. In addition, we detected epistatic QTL for plant height and biomass yield which, however, contributed only little to the genetic architecture of the traits. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the potential of genomic approaches for a knowledge-based improvement of biomass yield in triticale. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Wurschum T.,University of Hohenheim | Liu W.,China Agricultural University | Alheit K.V.,University of Hohenheim | Tucker M.R.,University of Adelaide | And 4 more authors.
G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics | Year: 2014

Many biologically and agronomically important traits are dynamic and show temporal variation. In this study, we used triticale (× Triticosecale Wittmack) as a model crop to assess the genetic dynamics underlying phenotypic plasticity of adult plant development. To this end, a large mapping population with 647 doubled haploid lines derived from four partially connected families from crosses among six parents was scored for developmental stage at three different time points. Using genome-wide association mapping, we identified main effect and epistatic quantitative trait loci (QTL) at all three time points. Interestingly, some of these QTL were identified at all time points, whereas others appear to only contribute to the genetic architecture at certain developmental stages. Our results illustrate the temporal contribution of QTL to the genetic control of adult plant development and more generally, the temporal genetic patterns of regulation that underlie dynamic traits. © 2014 Würschum et al.


Liu W.,China Agricultural University | Gowda M.,University of Hohenheim | Reif J.C.,Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research | Hahn V.,University of Hohenheim | And 4 more authors.
BMC Genomics | Year: 2014

Background: The nature of dynamic traits with their phenotypic plasticity suggests that they are under the control of a dynamic genetic regulation. We employed a precision phenotyping platform to non-invasively assess biomass yield in a large mapping population of triticale at three developmental stages.Results: Using multiple-line cross QTL mapping we identified QTL for each of these developmental stages which explained a considerable proportion of the genotypic variance. Some QTL were identified at each developmental stage and thus contribute to biomass yield throughout the studied developmental phases. Interestingly, we also observed QTL that were only identified for one or two of the developmental stages illustrating a temporal contribution of these QTL to the trait. In addition, epistatic QTL were detected and the epistatic interaction landscape was shown to dynamically change with developmental progression.Conclusions: In summary, our results reveal the temporal dynamics of the genetic architecture underlying biomass accumulation in triticale and emphasize the need for a temporal assessment of dynamic traits. © 2014 Liu et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Busemeyer L.,Osnabruck University of Applied Sciences | Ruckelshausen A.,Osnabruck University of Applied Sciences | Moller K.,Osnabruck University of Applied Sciences | Melchinger A.E.,University of Hohenheim | And 7 more authors.
Scientific Reports | Year: 2013

To extend agricultural productivity by knowledge-based breeding and tailor varieties adapted to specific environmental conditions, it is imperative to improve our ability to assess the dynamic changes of the phenome of crops under field conditions. To this end, we have developed a precision phenotyping platform that combines various sensors for a non-invasive, high-throughput and high-dimensional phenotyping of small grain cereals. This platform yielded high prediction accuracies and heritabilities for biomass of triticale. Genetic variation for biomass accumulation was dissected with 647 doubled haploid lines derived from four families. Employing a genome-wide association mapping approach, two major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for biomass were identified and the genetic architecture of biomass accumulation was found to be characterized by dynamic temporal patterns. Our findings highlight the potential of precision phenotyping to assess the dynamic genetics of complex traits, especially those not amenable to traditional phenotyping.


PubMed | Saatzucht Dr. Hege GbR Domane Hohebuch, University of Hohenheim, University of Adelaide and China Agricultural University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2014

Abiotic stress experienced by autumn-sown crops during winter is of great economic importance as it can have a severe negative impact on yield. In this study, we investigated the genetic architecture of winter hardiness and frost tolerance in triticale. To this end, we used a large mapping population of 647 DH lines phenotyped for both traits in combination with genome-wide marker data. Employing multiple-line cross QTL mapping, we identified nine main effect QTL for winter hardiness and frost tolerance of which six were overlapping between both traits. Three major QTL were identified on chromosomes 5A, 1B and 5R. In addition, an epistasis scan revealed the contribution of epistasis to the genetic architecture of winter hardiness and frost tolerance in triticale. Taken together, our results show that winter hardiness and frost tolerance are complex traits that can be improved by phenotypic selection, but also that genomic approaches hold potential for a knowledge-based improvement of these important traits in elite triticale germplasm.


PubMed | Saatzucht Dr. Hege GbR Domane Hohebuch, China Agricultural University, University of Adelaide and University of Hohenheim
Type: Journal Article | Journal: G3 (Bethesda, Md.) | Year: 2014

Many biologically and agronomically important traits are dynamic and show temporal variation. In this study, we used triticale ( Triticosecale Wittmack) as a model crop to assess the genetic dynamics underlying phenotypic plasticity of adult plant development. To this end, a large mapping population with 647 doubled haploid lines derived from four partially connected families from crosses among six parents was scored for developmental stage at three different time points. Using genome-wide association mapping, we identified main effect and epistatic quantitative trait loci (QTL) at all three time points. Interestingly, some of these QTL were identified at all time points, whereas others appear to only contribute to the genetic architecture at certain developmental stages. Our results illustrate the temporal contribution of QTL to the genetic control of adult plant development and more generally, the temporal genetic patterns of regulation that underlie dynamic traits.

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