Bozeman, MT, United States
Bozeman, MT, United States

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Patent
Montana State University and S2 Corporation | Date: 2015-03-27

A method and apparatus includes an optical source for a single order single-sideband suppressed-carrier optical signal with a bandwidth that scales from over 4 gigaHertz or is at least 8 GHz from an optical carrier frequency. In an example embodiment, an apparatus includes a stable laser source configured to output an optical carrier signal at a carrier frequency. The apparatus includes a radio frequency electrical source configured to output an electrical radio frequency signal with a radio frequency bandwidth less than one octave. The apparatus also includes an optical modulator configured to output an optical signal with the optical carrier signal modulated by the radio frequency signal in a plurality of orders (harmonics) of optical frequency sidebands. The apparatus further includes an optical filter configured to pass one single order optical frequency sideband of the optical signal, which sideband does not overlap the sideband of any other harmonic.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.95M | Year: 2012

Navy electronic support (ES) functions require receivers making true wideband RF / microwave measurements on transient & frequency hopping signals over 1-40 GHz and beyond, including spectral mapping (SM) and direction finding (DF) with low latency. Wideband digitizers in RF/Microwave receivers are expensive, create ~50 Gs/s of data to be handled in real time by large computer systems, and have insufficient performance over wideband stares for Naval operations. The S2 Corp extreme bandwidth analyzer and correlator (EBAC) hardware is an RF / microwave receiver capable of SM and DF to be improved and tested on this effort. The EBAC is comprised of RF / microwave, photonic, cryogenic and electronic / digital components. RF signals are optically modulated at the antenna and fiber optically connected to other receiver components. On this program, we aim to improve the performance of our hardware, and field test it to demonstrate the capabilities. The technical goals for both SM and DF hardware in laboratory and field tests is over 16 GHz bandwidth, 60 dB spur free dynamic range, ~2 ms reconfiguration latency, variable frame rate from 2-200 kHz, variable resolution bandwidth from 0.04-10 MHz, and direction finding accuracy of


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 2.00M | Year: 2013

ABSTRACT: S2 Corporation and subcontractor Research Associates of Syracuse aim to develop a broadband hardware-based ultra high-speed signal processor for real time digital, broadband RF spectrum over 2-18 GHz with digital signal stream captures and analysis for a countermeasure applications, and to demonstrate these digital algorithms to significantly advance the tactical capability through complete and immediate knowledge of the full RF spectrum for enhanced spectral situational awareness, with regards to the generally stated DoD goal of controlling the RF spectrum. This approach will mitigate the core problem of wideband digitizing or narrowband channelizers as a unique union of photonic analog signal processing with digital signal results, that will be integrated with proven RF signal processing algorithms and FGPA hardware to provide a real-time capability to detect and measure signals of interest across a broad bandwidth with low latency. BENEFIT: Extreme wideband spectral analysis over bandwidths of 16 GHz demonstrated in operational hardware that can be scaled to >40 GHz, along with signal processing algorithms in real time digital systems that will perform SIGINT functions. The hardware has advantages over a conventional analog to digital converter based solution in all aspects, including performance, size, weight, power and cost.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.88K | Year: 2014

We proposed to analyze and demonstrate phase noise detection of emitters across a wide bandwidth>20 GHz with a novel RF sensor, and to identify and develop a set of approaches to make passive measurements of the signatures and phase noise of non-cooperative antenna platform systems, utilizing the emissions from the antenna and/or the reflections off the antenna from jammers and other transmitters. We will determine technical feasibility through modeling and simulation. We aim to demonstrate these techniques, and promote transition of these techniques to SEWIP Block2/3.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.83K | Year: 2013

S2 Corporation and subcontractor Montana State University offer their wideband photonic technologies for signal generation and sensing and a workplan to address the needed novel characterization techniques for passive components operating over very wide bandwidth, at frequencies up to 110 GHz. In the Phase 1 effort, we will develop concepts for very wide bandwidth, very high frequency passive components and characterization techniques and show feasibly developed into a useful product for the Navy.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 149.97K | Year: 2013

NSF SBIR Phase I Proposal 1249014 - Request for Abstract

This Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) Phase I project advances arbitrary waveform generation (AWG) capabilities for high bandwidth operation essential in technologies such as telecommunications, test and measurement, remote sensing, and others where higher bandwidths are demanded but cannot be achieved with current electronic devices. This new innovation employs an optical fiber storage ring to interferometrically combine many low-bandwidth input waveforms to synthesize high-bandwidth output waveforms. This technology exploits advances in stable fiber lasers and telecommunications components with hardware comprised of commercial off-the-shelf photonics and low-bandwidth electronics. Prior efforts have successfully demonstrated the device concept and led to one patent pending. This SBIR project addresses fundamental coherence issues through device-engineering that enables bandwidth extension above 25 GHz, and noise reduction in the photonic components, moving this innovative solution towards a viable commercial product. Metrics for success are combined bandwidth, time aperture, and signal fidelity. This photonic method for wideband AWG offers the potential for high bandwidth (>100 GHz), long waveform durations (>10 microseconds), with high fidelity (40 dB SFDR).


The broader impact/commercial potential of this project offers the potential for transformative advances in full utilization of the electromagnetic spectrum spanning microwave to terahertz frequencies. In particular, this approach is ideally suited to bridge the technological gap that exists between waveform generation by well-developed continuous AM or PM modulation of individual coherent sources and by proposed methods of controlled synthesis of frequency arrays. This technology provides a unique combination of high spectral resolution, long time aperture, and high bandwidth that has broad application in test and measurement devices, telecommunications, signal processing, and next-generation information technologies that exploit the full information capacity of optical fiber beyond the current capabilities. Generation of agile, complex, wideband optical waveforms can enable new paradigms for free space optical communications, while also applicable to spread spectrum and low probability of intercept applications. This project also aims to investigate fundamental noise issues inherent to repeated re-amplification of coherent optical signals, providing insights directly relevant to meeting the rapidly increasing needs of our modern information age. Furthermore, the coherent optical storage ring technology developed in this project will benefit a number of other potential applications such as wideband spectrum analysis and ultra-high precision characterization of optical oscillators.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 277.50K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project will adapt a photonics based signal processor to propel applications in extreme bandwidth spread-spectrum wireless communications. The signal processor prototype known as the spatial spectral holographic (S2H) extreme bandwidth analyzer / correlator (EBAC) will function as a correlating receiver for low probability of intercept (covert) and interference immune spread-spectrum communications in any radio frequency/millimeter wave (RF/MMW) band. The Phase I effort proof of concept demonstrations showed correlation and demodulation of>4 GHz bandwidth signals with processing gain exceeding 40 dB. The Phase II project will demonstrate continuous transmission signal generation and receiver processing prototype hardware with the ability to demodulate extreme instantaneous bandwidth up to 20 GHz spread-spectrum communications signals with long duration spreading waveforms up to 1 ms, with high data rates (1-1,000 Mb/s), and flexible frequency coverage exceeding 40 GHz. For particular intensive signal processing functions such as spectral analysis and correlation the S2H EBAC analog signal processor demonstrates higher performance and power efficiency than traditional digital signal processing. The intellectual merit of this project is in the advancement of the core technology and application to new real-world applications. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project include opportunities for major academic and commercial developments in communication technology, spectrum analysis, and spectrum enforcement with wide operating bandwidths from 0.5-40 GHz IBW. Initial commercial market would be for spectrum analysis systems with a customer base in electro-magnetic environment testing, tactical DoD next-generation wideband passive surveillance systems, law enforcement surveillance, and intelligence community spectrum sensing. In wireless communications, this technology has the potential extend the reach of spread spectrum communications to new operational paradigms. Beyond communications, commercial applications include test and measurement systems, magnetic resonance imaging, weather radar, earth mapping, navigation, and spectrum use enforcement (the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the U.S.). The enabling technology has commercial, military and intelligence community benefits in the form of geo-location, direction finding, data selection and filtering, navigation, and imaging. With the collaboration with our university partner on this project, we will also support unique applications focused research experience opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students in STEM fields.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2012

This Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Phase I project aims to use and adapt a photonics based extreme bandwidth RF and Microwave spectrum analyzer as a real-time spectral manager for wireless communication systems. The approach is enabled by a spatial-spectral holographic based spectrum analyzer developed by the STTR team that can have instantaneous processing bandwidth of 40 GHz or greater while retaining with high spectral resolution and low latency (<<1 ms) output. This sensor hardware will be applied to wideband, real-time spectral management of wireless communications for operation in environments with new spectral access regulatory models. When combined with low latency digital processing, using specialized digital signal processing hardware such as field programmable gate arrays and appropriate databases and software, the system will allow continuous and simultaneous monitoring of all common wireless communication bands for rapid distribution of channel occupancy data. Project activities include: identifying the physical measurements and spectral signatures needed for wideband spectrum management, implementing specialized computer based algorithms to extract this information for real-time management, and investigating advanced spatial-spectral optical signal processing architectures to automatically recognize wireless signal characteristics such as modulation formats that are beyond the current power spectrum measurement capability. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project includes uses in commercial wireless communication systems, RF test and measurement, defense signal intelligence and communications, regulatory spectrum management, and navigation and geo-location applications. The first commercial impact is to enable dynamic identification and allocation of unused spectral resources in real time, in order to maximize the efficiency and increase the capacity of wireless networks. The large bandwidth and frequency scalability of the spatial-spectral sensor technology could assist the growth of emerging radio communication technologies in existing bands, and in emerging bands such as E-band. Additionally, this technology could assist governmental spectrum regulatory compliance enforcement, which could help to lead to changes in spectrum allocation policy. Increased wireless capacity will help to enhance access to broadband internet access, including to poor or rural areas, where the capital costs of implementing physical infrastructure like fiber optic lines is cost prohibitive (evidenced by the developing world's use of cellular phones over landlines). Beyond communications, RF monitoring has several applications ranging from electronic defense, to navigation and geo-location.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: STTR PHASE II | Award Amount: 558.00K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project will adapt a photonics based signal processor to propel applications in extreme bandwidth spread-spectrum wireless communications. The signal processor prototype known as the spatial spectral holographic (S2H) extreme bandwidth analyzer / correlator (EBAC) will function as a correlating receiver for low probability of intercept (covert) and interference immune spread-spectrum communications in any radio frequency/millimeter wave (RF/MMW) band. The Phase I effort proof of concept demonstrations showed correlation and demodulation of >4 GHz bandwidth signals with processing gain exceeding 40 dB. The Phase II project will demonstrate continuous transmission signal generation and receiver processing prototype hardware with the ability to demodulate extreme instantaneous bandwidth up to 20 GHz spread-spectrum communications signals with long duration spreading waveforms up to 1 ms, with high data rates (1-1,000 Mb/s), and flexible frequency coverage exceeding 40 GHz. For particular intensive signal processing functions such as spectral analysis and correlation the S2H EBAC analog signal processor demonstrates higher performance and power efficiency than traditional digital signal processing. The intellectual merit of this project is in the advancement of the core technology and application to new real-world applications.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project include opportunities for major academic and commercial developments in communication technology, spectrum analysis, and spectrum enforcement with wide operating bandwidths from 0.5-40 GHz IBW. Initial commercial market would be for spectrum analysis systems with a customer base in electro-magnetic environment testing, tactical DoD next-generation wideband passive surveillance systems, law enforcement surveillance, and intelligence community spectrum sensing. In wireless communications, this technology has the potential extend the reach of spread spectrum communications to new operational paradigms. Beyond communications, commercial applications include test and measurement systems, magnetic resonance imaging, weather radar, earth mapping, navigation, and spectrum use enforcement (the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the U.S.). The enabling technology has commercial, military and intelligence community benefits in the form of geo-location, direction finding, data selection and filtering, navigation, and imaging. With the collaboration with our university partner on this project, we will also support unique applications focused research experience opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students in STEM fields.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.97K | Year: 2013

NSF SBIR Phase I Proposal 1249014 - Request for Abstract This Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) Phase I project advances arbitrary waveform generation (AWG) capabilities for high bandwidth operation essential in technologies such as telecommunications, test and measurement, remote sensing, and others where higher bandwidths are demanded but cannot be achieved with current electronic devices. This new innovation employs an optical fiber storage ring to interferometrically combine many low-bandwidth input waveforms to synthesize high-bandwidth output waveforms. This technology exploits advances in stable fiber lasers and telecommunications components with hardware comprised of commercial off-the-shelf photonics and low-bandwidth electronics. Prior efforts have successfully demonstrated the device concept and led to one patent pending. This SBIR project addresses fundamental coherence issues through device-engineering that enables bandwidth extension above 25 GHz, and noise reduction in the photonic components, moving this innovative solution towards a viable commercial product. Metrics for success are combined bandwidth, time aperture, and signal fidelity. This photonic method for wideband AWG offers the potential for high bandwidth (>100 GHz), long waveform durations (>10 microseconds), with high fidelity (40 dB SFDR). The broader impact/commercial potential of this project offers the potential for transformative advances in full utilization of the electromagnetic spectrum spanning microwave to terahertz frequencies. In particular, this approach is ideally suited to bridge the technological gap that exists between waveform generation by well-developed continuous AM or PM modulation of individual coherent sources and by proposed methods of controlled synthesis of frequency arrays. This technology provides a unique combination of high spectral resolution, long time aperture, and high bandwidth that has broad application in test and measurement devices, telecommunications, signal processing, and next-generation information technologies that exploit the full information capacity of optical fiber beyond the current capabilities. Generation of agile, complex, wideband optical waveforms can enable new paradigms for free space optical communications, while also applicable to spread spectrum and low probability of intercept applications. This project also aims to investigate fundamental noise issues inherent to repeated re-amplification of coherent optical signals, providing insights directly relevant to meeting the rapidly increasing needs of our modern information age. Furthermore, the coherent optical storage ring technology developed in this project will benefit a number of other potential applications such as wideband spectrum analysis and ultra-high precision characterization of optical oscillators.

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