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Saint Petersburg, Russia

Serebryakov V.A.,St Petersburg National Research University Of Information Technologies | Boiko E.V.,S M Kirov Armed Forces Medical Academy | Yan A.V.,S M Kirov Armed Forces Medical Academy
Journal of Optical Technology (A Translation of Opticheskii Zhurnal) | Year: 2014

Laser coagulation of the retina carries risk of damaging the neuroretina because of variation of the beam power and of the local pigmentation of the retinal pigmented epithelium and the choroid. The degree of coagulation depends on the induced temperature rise and the exposure time. Laser retinotherapy with optoacoustic monitoring of the temperature provides reproducible ophthalmologically invisible (subthreshold) damage of the retina in a wide range of laser power, regardless of local changes of the tissue structure. Optoacoustic temperature measurements are based on the excitation of a pressure wave in the retinal tissue by repeated low-energy probe laser pulses. The amplitude of the pressure signal, which can be detected by means of an acoustic transducer incorporated in a laser contact lens, correlates with the temperature of the tissue. This paper discusses promising directions of the use in clinical practice of real-time optoacoustic temperature monitoring of the retina during laser therapy in various irradiation regimes. © 2014 Optical Society of America.


Serebryakova V.A.,Saint Petersburg State University | Boiko E.V.,S M Kirov Armed Forces Medical Academy | Petrishchev N.N.,St. Petersburg State Medical University | Yan A.V.,S M Kirov Armed Forces Medical Academy
Journal of Optical Technology (A Translation of Opticheskii Zhurnal) | Year: 2010

Any application of lasers in medicine is based on a compromise between the efficiency with which the laser radiation interacts with biological tissue and the concomitant collateral effects. Correspondingly, parameters minimizing undesirable damage to tissue must be determined. The development of a new generation of solid-state lasers tunable over a wide range in the mid-IR range of the spectrum with parametric generation of light and a combination of high radiation intensity and relatively low pulse energy at high repetition frequency opens up new possibilities for less-invasive, high-precision, laser surgery, first and foremost, in ophthamology and neuro- and cardiosurgery. © 2010 Optical Society of America.

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