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Lucarelli P.,Hospital Madonna delle Grazie | Picchio M.,Hospital P Colombo | Martellucci J.,University of Siena | De Angelis F.,University of Rome La Sapienza | And 3 more authors.
Indian Journal of Surgery | Year: 2012

Drainage after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) for acute calculous cholecystitis (ACC) is used without evidence of its efficacy. The present pilot study was designed to address this issue. After laparoscopic gallbladder removal, 15 patients were randomized to have a drain positioned in the subhepatic space (group A) and 15 patients to have a sham drain (group B). The primary outcome measure was the presence of subhepatic fluid collection at abdominal ultrasonography, performed 24 h after surgery. Secondary outcome measures included postoperative abdominal and shoulder tip pain, use of analgesics, and morbidity. Abdominal ultrasonography did not show any subhepatic fluid collection in eight patients (53.3 %) in group A and in five patients (33.3 %) in group B (P = 0.462). If present, median (range) subhepatic collection was 50 mL (20-100 mL) in group A and 80 mL (30-120 mL) in group B (P = 0.573). No significant differences in the severity of abdominal and shoulder pain and use of parenteral ketorolac were found in either group. Two biliary leaks and one subhepatic fluid collection occurred postoperatively. The present study was unable to prove that the drain was useful in LC for ACC, performed in a selected group of patients. © 2012 Association of Surgeons of India.


PubMed | University of Rome La Sapienza, Hospital S Giovanni Addolorata, Hospital Madonna delle Grazie, University of Siena and Hospital P Colombo
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Indian journal of surgery | Year: 2016

Drainage after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) for acute calculous cholecystitis (ACC) is used without evidence of its efficacy. The present pilot study was designed to address this issue. After laparoscopic gallbladder removal, 15 patients were randomized to have a drain positioned in the subhepatic space (group A) and 15 patients to have a sham drain (group B). The primary outcome measure was the presence of subhepatic fluid collection at abdominal ultrasonography, performed 24h after surgery. Secondary outcome measures included postoperative abdominal and shoulder tip pain, use of analgesics, and morbidity. Abdominal ultrasonography did not show any subhepatic fluid collection in eight patients (53.3%) in group A and in five patients (33.3%) in group B (P=0.462). If present, median (range) subhepatic collection was 50mL (20-100mL) in group A and 80mL (30-120mL) in group B (P=0.573). No significant differences in the severity of abdominal and shoulder pain and use of parenteral ketorolac were found in either group. Two biliary leaks and one subhepatic fluid collection occurred postoperatively. The present study was unable to prove that the drain was useful in LC for ACC, performed in a selected group of patients.


Picchio M.,Hospital P Colombo | Lucarelli P.,Basildon Hospital | Di Filippo A.,University of Rome La Sapienza | De Angelis F.,University of Rome La Sapienza | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons | Year: 2015

Background and Objectives: Routine drainage after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is still controversial. This meta-analysis was performed to assess the role of drains in reducing complications in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods: An electronic search of Medline, Science Citation Index Expanded, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library database from January 1990 to June 2013 was performed to identify randomized clinical trials that compare prophylactic drainage with no drainage in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The odds ratio for qualitative variables and standardized mean difference for continuous variables were calculated. Results: Twelve randomized controlled trials were included in the meta-analysis, involving 1939 patients randomized to a drain (960) versus no drain (979). The morbidity rate was lower in the no drain group (odds ratio, 1.97; 95% confidence interval, 1.26 to 3.10; P =.003). The wound infection rate was lower in the no drain group (odds ratio, 2.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.22 to 4.51; P <.01). Abdominal pain 24 hours after surgery was less severe in the no drain group (standardized mean difference, 2.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.27 to 3.34; P <.0001). No significant difference was present with respect to the presence and quantity of subhepatic fluid collection, shoulder tip pain, parenteral ketorolac consumption, nausea, vomiting, and hospital stay. Conclusion: This study was unable to prove that drains were useful in reducing complications in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. © 2014 by JSLS, Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons. Published by the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons, Inc.


PubMed | University of Rome La Sapienza, Hospital S Giovanni Addolorata, Hospital P Colombo and Basildon Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: JSLS : Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons | Year: 2014

Routine drainage after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is still controversial. This meta-analysis was performed to assess the role of drains in reducing complications in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.An electronic search of Medline, Science Citation Index Expanded, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library database from January 1990 to June 2013 was performed to identify randomized clinical trials that compare prophylactic drainage with no drainage in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The odds ratio for qualitative variables and standardized mean difference for continuous variables were calculated.Twelve randomized controlled trials were included in the meta-analysis, involving 1939 patients randomized to a drain (960) versus no drain (979). The morbidity rate was lower in the no drain group (odds ratio, 1.97; 95% confidence interval, 1.26 to 3.10; P = .003). The wound infection rate was lower in the no drain group (odds ratio, 2.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.22 to 4.51; P = .01). Abdominal pain 24 hours after surgery was less severe in the no drain group (standardized mean difference, 2.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.27 to 3.34; P < .0001). No significant difference was present with respect to the presence and quantity of subhepatic fluid collection, shoulder tip pain, parenteral ketorolac consumption, nausea, vomiting, and hospital stay.This study was unable to prove that drains were useful in reducing complications in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.


Picchio M.,Civil Hospital P Colombo | Greco E.,Civil Hospital P Colombo | Di Filippo A.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Marino G.,Civil Hospital P Colombo | And 2 more authors.
Indian Journal of Surgery | Year: 2015

Surgical therapy guaranties satisfactory results, which are significantly better than those obtained with conservative therapies, especially for Grade III and IV hemorrhoids. In this review, we present and discuss the results of the most diffuse surgical techniques for hemorrhoids. Traditional surgery for hemorrhoids aims to remove the hemorrhoids, with closure (Fergusson’s technique) or without closure (Milligan–Morgan procedure) of the ensuing defect. This traditional approach is effective, but causes a significant postoperative pain because of wide external wounds in the innervated perianal skin. Stapled hemorrhoidopexy, proposed by Longo, has gained a vast acceptance because of less postoperative pain and faster return to normal activities. In the recent literature, a significant incidence of recurrence after stapled hemorrhoidopexy was reported, when compared with conventional hemorrhoidectomy. Double stapler hemorrhoidopexy may be an alternative to simple stapled hemorrhoidopexy to reduce the recurrence in advanced hemorrhoidal prolapse. Transanal hemorrhoidal deartertialization was showed to be as effective as stapled hemorrhoidopexy in terms of treatment success, complications, and incidence recurrence. However, further high-quality trials are recommended to assess the efficacy and safety of this technique. © 2014, Association of Surgeons of India.


Stipa F.,Hospital S Giovanni Addolorata | Burza A.,Hospital S Giovanni Addolorata | Curinga R.,Hospital S Giovanni Addolorata | Santini E.,Hospital S Giovanni Addolorata | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Colorectal Disease | Year: 2015

Purpose: Intracorporeal anastomosis associated to trans-vaginal specimen extraction decreases the extent of colon mobilisation and the number and size of abdominal incisions, improving the benefits of minimally invasive surgery in female patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of this procedure for colorectal cancer. Methods: Between 2009 and 2013, 13 female patients underwent laparoscopic colon and rectal resection for colorectal cancer with intracorporeal anastomosis and trans-vaginal specimen extraction: 2 right colectomies, 1 transverse colon resection, 4 left colectomies and 6 anterior resections were performed. A MEDLINE search of publications on the presented procedure for colon neoplasms was carried out. Results: There were no intraoperative complications and no conversions. Postoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) score in the pelvis, abdomen and shoulder was moderate. In the postoperative period, we observed two colorectal anastomotic strictures, successfully treated with pneumatic endoscopic dilation. Median length of the specimen was 18.5 cm, with a median tumour size of 5.5 cm in diameter. Median number of retrieved lymph nodes was 12. All circumferential resection margins were negative. During a mean follow-up of 31 months (range, 6–62), there was neither evidence of recurrent disease nor disorders related to the genitourinary system. The aesthetic outcome was considered satisfactory in all patients. Nine studies were identified in the systematic review. Conclusions: Our case series, according to the results of the literature, showed that intracorporeal anastomosis associated to trans-vaginal specimen extraction is feasible and safe in selected female patients. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Picchio M.,Hospital P Colombo | De Angelis F.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Zazza S.,Hospital P Colombo | Filippo A.D.,University of Rome La Sapienza | And 6 more authors.
Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques | Year: 2012

Background: Routine drainage after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is still debatable. The present study was designed to assess the role of drains in laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed for nonacutely inflamed gallbladder. Methods: After laparoscopic gallbladder removal, 53 patients were randomized to have a suction drain positioned in the subhepatic space and 53 patients to have a sham drain. The primary outcome measure was the presence of subhepatic fluid collection at abdominal ultrasonography, performed 24 h after surgery. Secondary outcome measures were postoperative abdominal and shoulder tip pain, use of analgesics, nausea, vomiting, and morbidity. Results: Subhepatic fluid collection was not found in 45 patients (84.9 %) in group A and in 46 patients (86.8 %) in group B (difference 1.9 (95 % confidence interval -11.37 to 15.17; P = 0.998). No significant difference in visual analogue scale scores with respect to abdominal and shoulder pain, use of parenteral ketorolac, nausea, and vomiting were found in either group. Two (1.9 %) significant hemorrhagic events occurred postoperatively. Wound infection was observed in three patients (5.7 %) in group A and two patients (3.8 %) in group B (difference 1.9 (95 % CI -6.19 to 9.99; P = 0.997). Conclusions: The present study was unable to prove that the drain was useful in elective, uncomplicated LC. © The Author(s) 2012.


PubMed | Hospital S Giovanni Addolorata
Type: Case Reports | Journal: International journal of colorectal disease | Year: 2015

Intracorporeal anastomosis associated to trans-vaginal specimen extraction decreases the extent of colon mobilisation and the number and size of abdominal incisions, improving the benefits of minimally invasive surgery in female patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of this procedure for colorectal cancer.Between 2009 and 2013, 13 female patients underwent laparoscopic colon and rectal resection for colorectal cancer with intracorporeal anastomosis and trans-vaginal specimen extraction: 2 right colectomies, 1 transverse colon resection, 4 left colectomies and 6 anterior resections were performed. A MEDLINE search of publications on the presented procedure for colon neoplasms was carried out.There were no intraoperative complications and no conversions. Postoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) score in the pelvis, abdomen and shoulder was moderate. In the postoperative period, we observed two colorectal anastomotic strictures, successfully treated with pneumatic endoscopic dilation. Median length of the specimen was 18.5 cm, with a median tumour size of 5.5 cm in diameter. Median number of retrieved lymph nodes was 12. All circumferential resection margins were negative. During a mean follow-up of 31 months (range, 6-62), there was neither evidence of recurrent disease nor disorders related to the genitourinary system. The aesthetic outcome was considered satisfactory in all patients. Nine studies were identified in the systematic review.Our case series, according to the results of the literature, showed that intracorporeal anastomosis associated to trans-vaginal specimen extraction is feasible and safe in selected female patients.

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