s Framingham Heart Study and the Center for Population Studies

Framingham, MA, United States

s Framingham Heart Study and the Center for Population Studies

Framingham, MA, United States

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Woodward O.M.,Johns Hopkins University | Liu C.-T.,Boston University | Lu X.,Boston University | Nalls M.A.,U.S. National Institute on Aging | And 24 more authors.
Human Molecular Genetics | Year: 2011

Serum urate concentrations are highly heritable and elevated serum urate is a key risk factor for gout. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of serum urate in African American (AA) populations are lacking. We conducted a meta-analysis of GWAS of serum urate levels and gout among 5820 AA and a large candidate gene study among 6890 AA and 21 708 participants of European ancestry (EA) within the Candidate Gene Association Resource Consortium. Findings were tested for replication among 1996 independent AA individuals, and evaluated for their association among 28 283 EA participants of the CHARGE Consortium. Functional studies were conducted using 14C-urate transport assays in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary cells. In the discovery GWAS of serum urate, three loci achieved genome-wide significance (P < 5.0 × 10 -8): a novel locus near SGK1/SLC2A12 on chromosome 6 (rs9321453, P = 1.0 × 10 -9), and two loci previously identified in EA participants, SLC2A9 (P = 3.8 × 10 -32) and SLC22A12 (P = 2.1 × 10 -10). A novel rare non-synonymous variant of large effect size in SLC22A12, rs12800450 (minor allele frequency 0.01, G65W), was identified and replicated (beta 21.19 mg/dl, P = 2.7 × 10 -16). 14C-urate transport assays showed reduced urate transport for the G65W URAT1 mutant. Finally, in analyses of 11 loci previously associated with serum urate in EA individuals, 10 of 11 lead single-nucleotide polymorphisms showed direction-consistent association with urate among AA. In summary, we identified and replicated one novel locus in association with serum urate levels and experimentally characterize the novel G65W variant in URAT1 as a functional allele. Our data support the importance of multi-ethnic GWAS in the identification of novel risk loci as well as functional variants. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.


Boger C.A.,University of Regensburg | Gorski M.,University of Regensburg | Gorski M.,Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research | Hoffmann M.M.,Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg | And 46 more authors.
PLoS Genetics | Year: 2011

Family studies suggest a genetic component to the etiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end stage renal disease (ESRD). Previously, we identified 16 loci for eGFR in genome-wide association studies, but the associations of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for incident CKD or ESRD are unknown. We thus investigated the association of these loci with incident CKD in 26,308 individuals of European ancestry free of CKD at baseline drawn from eight population-based cohorts followed for a median of 7.2 years (including 2,122 incident CKD cases defined as eGFR <60ml/min/1.73m 2 at follow-up) and with ESRD in four case-control studies in subjects of European ancestry (3,775 cases, 4,577 controls). SNPs at 11 of the 16 loci (UMOD, PRKAG2, ANXA9, DAB2, SHROOM3, DACH1, STC1, SLC34A1, ALMS1/NAT8, UBE2Q2, and GCKR) were associated with incident CKD; p-values ranged from p = 4.1e-9 in UMOD to p = 0.03 in GCKR. After adjusting for baseline eGFR, six of these loci remained significantly associated with incident CKD (UMOD, PRKAG2, ANXA9, DAB2, DACH1, and STC1). SNPs in UMOD (OR = 0.92, p = 0.04) and GCKR (OR = 0.93, p = 0.03) were nominally associated with ESRD. In summary, the majority of eGFR-related loci are either associated or show a strong trend towards association with incident CKD, but have modest associations with ESRD in individuals of European descent. Additional work is required to characterize the association of genetic determinants of CKD and ESRD at different stages of disease progression.


Holliday E.G.,University of Newcastle | Holliday E.G.,Clinical Research Design | Traylor M.,University of Cambridge | Malik R.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | And 40 more authors.
Stroke | Year: 2014

Background and Purpose - Epidemiological studies show strong associations between kidney dysfunction and risk of ischemic stroke (IS), the mechanisms of which are incompletely understood. We investigated whether these associations may reflect shared heritability because of a common polygenic basis and whether this differed for IS subtypes.Methods - Polygenic models were derived using genome-wide association studies meta-analysis results for 3 kidney traits: estimated glomerular filtration rate using serum creatinine (eGFRcrea: n=73 998), eGFR using cystatin C (eGFRcys: n=22 937), and urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (n=31 580). For each, single nucleotide polymorphisms passing 10 P value thresholds were used to form profile scores in 4561 IS cases and 7094 controls from the United Kingdom, Germany, and Australia. Scores were tested for association with IS and its 3 aetiological subtypes: large artery atherosclerosis, cardioembolism, and small vessel disease.Results - Polygenic scores correlating with higher eGFRcrea were associated with reduced risk of large artery atherosclerosis, with 5 scores reaching P<0.05 (peak P=0.004) and all showing the epidemiologically expected direction of effect. A similar pattern was observed for polygenic scores reflecting higher urinary albumin to creatinine ratio, of which 3 associated with large artery atherosclerosis (peak P=0.01) and all showed the expected directional association. One urinary albumin to creatinine ratio-based score also associated with small vessel disease (P=0.03). The global pattern of results was unlikely to have occurred by chance (P=0.02).Conclusions - This study suggests possible polygenic correlation between renal dysfunction and IS. The shared genetic components may be specific to stroke subtypes, particularly large artery atherosclerotic stroke. Further study of the genetic relationships between these disorders seems merited. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.


PubMed | University of Turku, CNR Institute of Neuroscience, Harvard University, Hunter Medical Research Institute and 75 more.
Type: | Journal: Nature communications | Year: 2016

Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways.

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