New Brunswick, NJ, United States
New Brunswick, NJ, United States

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, /ˈrʌtɡərz/, commonly referred to as Rutgers University, Rutgers, or RU, is an American public research university and the largest institution for higher education in New Jersey.Originally chartered as Queen's College on November 10, 1766, Rutgers is the eighth-oldest college in the United States and one of the nine "Colonial Colleges" founded before the American Revolution. The college was renamed Rutgers College in 1825 in honor of Colonel Henry Rutgers , a New York City landowner, philanthropist and former military officer, whose generous donation to the school allowed it to reopen after years of financial difficulty. For most of its existence, Rutgers was a private liberal arts college affiliated with the Dutch Reformed Church and admitted only male students. The college expanded its role in research and instruction in agriculture, engineering, and science when it was named as the state's sole land-grant college in 1864 under the Morrill Act of 1862. It gained university status in 1924 with the introduction of graduate education and further expansion. However, Rutgers evolved into a coeducational public research university after being designated "The State University of New Jersey" by the New Jersey Legislature in laws enacted in 1945 and 1956. It is one of only two colonial colleges that later became public universities.Rutgers has three campuses located throughout New Jersey. The New Brunswick campus straddles the Raritan River in New Brunswick and adjacent Piscataway. Two regional campuses are located in Newark and Camden, with additional facilities elsewhere in New Jersey. Instruction is offered by 9,000 faculty members in 175 academic departments to over 45,000 undergraduate students and more than 20,000 graduate and professional students.Rutgers is considered to be a Public Ivy, a term coined to describe public universities that offer an academic climate comparable to that in the Ivy League. The University is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and is a member of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, the Association of American Universities and the Universities Research Association Wikipedia.


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Patent
Princeton University and Rutgers University | Date: 2016-08-22

The American Cancer Society estimated that in 2009, 1,479,350 new cancer cases would be diagnosed in the United States of which 219,440 would be lung and bronchus related. The standard treatments for NSCLC include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, laser and photodynamic therapy, all with various success rates depending on the stage of the cancer. National Cancer Institute assesses, however, that results of standard treatment are generally poor with only a 15 percent 5-year survival rate for combined cancer stages. Challenges facing the current chemotherapy drugs include excessive toxicity to healthy tissues and limited ability to prevent metastases. A dual drug delivery system described herein selectively targets the lung to deliver anti-cancer drugs and inhibit the formation of metastases.


Patent
Rutgers University | Date: 2016-08-15

The invention provides bipartite inhibitors of bacterial RNA polymerase having the general structural formula (I): X--Y(I) wherein X is an moiety that binds to the rifamycin binding site of a bacterial RNA polymerase, Y is a moiety that binds to the GE23077 binding site of a bacterial RNA polymerase, and is a linker. The invention also provides compositions comprising such compounds, methods of making such compounds, and methods of using said compounds. The invention has applications in control of bacterial gene expression, control of bacterial growth, antibacterial chemistry, and antibacterial therapy.


A bonding element, a bonding element matrix and composite materials with a wide range of attractive properties that may be optimized, including, but not limited to, mechanical properties, thermal properties, magnetic properties, optical properties and nuclear properties, as a result of a first layer and second layer structure or core, first layer, and second layer structure of the bonding elements, as well as methods for making the bonding elements and the corresponding ceramic and/or composite materials.


Patent
Rutgers University and Lehigh University | Date: 2016-10-26

Augmented or synergized anti-inflammatory constructs are disclosed including anti-inflammatory amino acids covalently conjugated with other anti-inflammatory molecules such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vanilloids and ketone bodies. Further conjugation with a choline bioisostere or an additional anti-inflammatory moiety further augments the anti-inflammatory activity.


Patent
Rutgers University | Date: 2016-05-31

Recombinant bacterial triple-helical collagen-like proteins comprising two or more repetitive sequences of Gly-Xaa-Yaa yielding high-stability polymeric constructs without the need for post-translational modifications and which may incorporate one or more functional domains of biological or structural importance. The polymers are capable of high-yield production for a variety of applications


The present application discloses the first rare-earth-free metal organic framework (MOF) yellow phosphors that can be effectively excited by blue light and assembled in a white light emission (WLED) device with a blue chip. The compounds of the present invention exhibit significantly enhanced emission intensity compared to the constituent ligand and high quantum yield and high thermal and moisture stability and photoluminescence. The invention also includes light emitting devices comprising any of these MOF yellow phosphors and methods of preparing these compounds and devices.


The present invention is directed to reagents useful for generating immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for diagnosing infection and disease in a subject that has been exposed to M. tuberculosis.


Patent
Rutgers University | Date: 2016-10-19

Bone tissue materials comprising insulin-mimetic agents, such as suitable zinc, vanadium, tungsten, molybdenum, niobium, selenium, and manganese compounds, for facilitating spinal fusion of vertebrae M spinal fusion surgical procedures, and methods thereof. Additionally provided is a bone tissue kit for facilitating fusion of vertebrae in a spinal fusion surgical procedure including a composition formulated for facile application in a spinal fusion procedure comprising an insulin-mimetic agent and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. Yet further provided is an implantable device for enhancing spinal fusion including a prosthetic implant configured to stabilize and promote the fusion of two adjacent vertebrae, wherein the bone tissue contacting surfaces of the prosthetic implant are coated with a composition comprising an insulin-mimetic agent.


Patent
Rutgers University | Date: 2015-04-15

The invention relates to Raman spectroscopy-based sensing technique. More particularly, the invention relates to a surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) composite and methods of its use and fabrication.


Patent
At&T and Rutgers University | Date: 2016-11-21

In a cloud app market, a cloud infrastructure customer can purchase apps for performing services such as rootkit detection and network security for a customer virtual machine run by the cloud infrastructure customer. A cloud infrastructure provider executes a provider virtual machine monitor or hypervisor on cloud infrastructure. The cloud app is provided with a customer virtual machine monitor nested on the provider virtual machine monitor. The customer virtual machine, together with a nested management domain of the customer, execute on the customer virtual machine monitor.


Patent
Rutgers University | Date: 2015-08-19

A new Cornus kousa cultivar that is clearly distinguished by its floriferous display of showy, dark-pink floral bracts, attractive dark-green foliage, high level of winter hardiness, and tolerance of the incitants of powdery mildew.


Patent
Rutgers University | Date: 2017-02-22

The present invention provides a probe set for in situ hybridization that enables detection of individual mRNA molecules. The present invention also provides a kit or a hybridization solution comprising a probe of the invention and a method of detecting a first target sequence of individual mRNA molecules in a cell.


Samokhvalov A.,Rutgers University
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews | Year: 2017

Titanium dioxide TiO2 remains a benchmark photocatalyst with high stability, low toxicity and cost, but it is active only under the UV light. To increase photocatalytic activity, TiO2 is “doped” with metals and nonmetals; nitrogen doped titania N-TiO2 has been extensively investigated since the early 2000s. In the recent decade, an increased attention has been paid to additional dopant aka “codopant” added to N-TiO2 to increase the photocatalytic rate. This focused critical Review covers the research on N-TiO2 codoped with an additional element for the photocatalytic hydrogen generation, namely: (1) mechanistic studies of charge separation aimed to understand and predict photocatalytic activity; (2) nonmetal codoped N-X-TiO2; (3) base metal codoped N-M-TiO2; (4) noble metal codoped N-M-TiO2. Suitability and limitations of experimental methods for characterization of codoped N-TiO2 are discussed. The following mechanisms of photocatalysis with codoped N-TiO2 are reviewed: (a) excitation of TiO2; (b) excitation of N dopant induced states; c) an increased electron-hole (e-h) separation; (d) lowering over potential of hydrogen reduction; (e) excitation of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in N-TiO2 codoped with nanoparticles (NPs) of noble metals. Temporal stability of codoped N-TiO2 in H2 generation and transformation pathways of sacrificial electron donors are discussed as well. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd


Sowa J.E.,University of Baltimore | Lu J.,Rutgers University
Policy Studies Journal | Year: 2017

As part of this special issue, this article explores the relationship of public management research to the study of public policy and the policy process. Beginning with a review of the study of public management, this article then examines some current big questions in public management, with a focus on where these questions intersect with policy studies. This article concludes with several recommendations for fostering cross-field research. © 2016 Policy Studies Organization


Lagos M.J.,Rutgers University | Trugler A.,University of Graz | Hohenester U.,University of Graz | Batson P.E.,Rutgers University
Nature | Year: 2017

Imaging of vibrational excitations in and near nanostructures is essential for developing low-loss infrared nanophotonics, controlling heat transport in thermal nanodevices, inventing new thermoelectric materials and understanding nanoscale energy transport. Spatially resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy has previously been used to image plasmonic behaviour in nanostructures in an electron microscope, but hitherto it has not been possible to map vibrational modes directly in a single nanostructure, limiting our understanding of phonon coupling with photons and plasmons. Here we present spatial mapping of optical and acoustic, bulk and surface vibrational modes in magnesium oxide nanocubes using an atom-wide electron beam. We find that the energy and the symmetry of the surface polariton phonon modes depend on the size of the nanocubes, and that they are localized to the surfaces of the nanocube. We also observe a limiting of bulk phonon scattering in the presence of surface phonon modes. Most phonon spectroscopies are selectively sensitive to either surface or bulk excitations; therefore, by demonstrating the excitation of both bulk and surface vibrational modes using a single probe, our work represents advances in the detection and visualization of spatially confined surface and bulk phonons in nanostructures. © 2017 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature. All rights reserved.


The immune system must discriminate between agents of disease and an organism's healthy cells. While the identification of an antigen as self/non-self is critically important, the dynamic features of antigen presentation may also determine the immune system's response. Here, we use a simple mathematical model of immune activation to explore the idea of antigen discrimination through dynamics. We propose that antigen presentation is coupled to two nodes, one regulatory and one effecting the immune response, through an incoherent feedforward loop and repressive feedback. This circuit would allow the immune system to effectively estimate the increase of antigens with respect to time, a key determinant of immune reactivity in vivo. Our model makes the prediction that tumors growing at specific rates evade the immune system despite the continuous presence of antigens indicating disease, a phenomenon closely related to clinically observed "two-zone tolerance." Finally, we discuss a plausible biological instantiation of our circuit using combinations of regulatory and effector T cells. The author presents a model of immune recognition that combines three motifs from systems biology, negative feedback, incoherent feedforward loops, and bistability, and captures important dynamic features of antigen presentation. The model recapitulates experimental observations of separate zones of tumor control. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Rutgers University assistant professor of political science Shauna Shames conducted research about millennials’ disinterest in running for public office in 2014, and found that while they had a wide range of reasons, from the time it would take away from their career to the intense media scrutiny many candidates endure, the vast majority didn’t want to enter politics. Similarly, while doing research for their book, Running from Office: Why Young Americans Are Turned Off from Politics, authors Jennifer Lawless and Richard Fox found that 89% of millennials never wanted their name on a ballot. But since Donald Trump was elected president, Shames says there has been a sea change in millennials’ attitudes about running for office. The group Run for Something was launched in January 2017 to encourage young people to run. The organization signed up more than 8,000 members who are interested in launching campaigns. Suddenly, millennials are looking past the significant financial, time, and other investments. Shames, the author of Out of the Running: Why Millennials Reject Political Careers and Why it Matters, says some are concerned that running for and holding office could take away time from their career development. In addition, they’re overcoming what Shames calls the “ick factor”—heavy scrutiny, opposition research, and possible smear campaigns—to make a difference. But for those who do see through their goals and run for office, they’re getting a master class in how to be a better business leader, says Linda Goldstein, president of Linda Goldstein Consulting, LLC. She was the first woman mayor of Clayton, Missouri, and held the office for 14 years, working in commercial construction before she dipped her toe into politics. She says the education she got in defining a campaign strategy, communicating with various audiences quickly, and fending off competitors was similar to business demands, but often in a more intensive and fast-paced way. Running for office can build a number of important skills that will make you a better business leader. Whether you’re trying to win a political office or a promotion, you’ve got to convince people to invest something in you. You may be asking for their vote or donation during a campaign. You need those same skills to convince a supervisor that you’re ready for a bigger role or to land a power mentor who can help your career. “Politics is really a popularity contest,” says Amanda Litman, founder of Run for Something. “Being able to convince people to like you, to then trust you, to have credibility with them, will help you get things done for the voters and for your constituents.”


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Dr. Abbas Ardehali, a professor of surgery and medicine in the division of cardiothoracic surgery at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, has been selected a 2017 recipient of the Ellis Island Medal of Honor by the National Ethnic Coalition of Organizations. Ardehali will receive the award at ceremony on May 13 at historic Ellis Island in New York City. The medals are awarded annually to a group of distinguished U.S. citizens who exemplify a life dedicated to community service. These are individuals who preserve and celebrate the history, traditions and values of their ancestry while exemplifying the values of the American way of life, and who are dedicated to creating a better world. Since it was established in 1986, the Ellis Island Medal has been officially recognized by both Houses of Congress as one of the nation's most prestigious awards. Past recipients have included six U.S. presidents, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, as well as such notables as Frank Sinatra, Lee Iacocca, Quincy Jones, Muhammad Ali, Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel, Louis Zamperini and Rosa Parks. "I was surprised and honored to be informed that I was selected as a 2017 Ellis Island Medal of Honor awardee," said Ardehali. "I really think this recognition is a reflection of the accomplishments that our UCLA heart and lung transplant teams have achieved together." Ardehali serves as director of the UCLA Heart and Lung Transplant program, which was ranked as the largest combined heart and lung transplant program in the United States in 2016 by the United Network of Organ Sharing. Ardehali and his colleagues have been leaders in implementing new technologies to advance the field of heart and lung transplantation and have the depth of experience to take many of the more complex cases that other transplant centers are unable to accept. His professional accomplishments include a role in developing an innovative technology for transporting human heart and lungs in a beating or breathing state. The technology could help to improve clinical outcomes and expand the donor pool of organs to help patients. He also developed and patented a new technology that will improve the care of patients with end-stage lung disease. Ardehali has served as a volunteer on several committees for the United Network for Organ Sharing and several scientific organizations, with leadership positions in the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation, American Society of Transplant Surgeons, American Association of Thoracic Surgery and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Among his many honors and awards, Ardehali received a Resolution of Commendation by the California State Assembly and the the Breath of Life Award from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Ardehali has been a faculty member at UCLA since 1997. He also served as chief of cardiothoracic surgery at West Los Angeles Veterans Hospital from 1998 to 2012. He co-authored a textbook, "Khonsari's Cardiac Surgery: Safeguards and Pitfalls in Operative Technique," published in 2016. He has authored numerous book chapters and more than 100 peer-reviewed manuscripts and abstracts. Ardehali has been interviewed by ABC News, the Associated Press, CNN, Fox News, NBC News, CBS News, "The Doctor's Show," and Al Jazeera America. He completed his fellowship in cardiothoracic surgery at UCLA and his internal medicine residency at UC San Francisco. He earned a master's degree in public health at UC Berkeley; a medical degree at Emory University School of Medicine; and both a master's degree in chemical and biochemical engineering and an undergraduate degree in biology and biochemistry, both from Rutgers University. Born in Tehran, Iran, Ardehali moved to the United States when he was in high school. He and his wife, Mitra, who is a practicing dentist, have two daughters, Leila and Sara, currently attending Barnard College and Columbia University.


News Article | April 3, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

Graphene might hold the key to cooling the computer chips used in smartphones, computers and other electrical devices. Researchers at Rutgers University have utilized graphene to help decrease the excessive heat generated by the increasing power of shrinking electronic components. “You can fit graphene, a very thin, two-dimensional material that can be miniaturized, to cool a hot spot that creates heating problems in your chip,” Eva Andrei, Board of Governors professor of physics in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, said in a statement. “This solution doesn’t have moving parts and it’s quite efficient for cooling. “We’ve achieved a power factor that is about two times higher than in previous thermoelectric coolers,” she added. The power factor is the effectiveness of active cooling—when the electrical current carries heat away while passive cooling is when heat diffuses naturally. Graphene—carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice—conducts electricity better than copper, quickly diffuses heat and is 100 times stronger than steel. The researchers placed the graphene on devices made of boron nitride, which is extremely flat and smooth. In a tiny computer or smartphone chip, billions of transistors generate substantial heat and high temperatures can hamper the performance of transistors—electronic devices that control the flow of power and can amplify signals. Silicon dioxide—the traditional base for chips—hinders performance because it scatters electrons that can carry heat away. Current methods to cool chips include small fans in computers, which is becoming less efficient and often break down. Water is also used for cooling but the method is complicated and prone to leaks that can fry computers. “In a refrigerator, you have compression that does the cooling and you circulate a liquid,” Andrei said. “But this involves moving parts and one method of cooling without moving parts is called thermoelectric cooling.” In smartphone and computer chips a piece of wire connect to a hot chip and heat is carried away passively. However, if the metal has hot and cold ends the electrons zip around the hot end and are sluggish at the cold end. The researchers applied voltage to the metal, sending a current from the hot end to the cold end. The current spurred the electrons to carry away the heat much more efficiently than via passive cooling. Graphene is actually superior in both active and passive cooling and combining both makes graphene an efficient cooler. “The electronics industry is moving towards this kind of cooling,” Andrei said. “There’s a very big research push to incorporate these kinds of coolers. “There is a good chance that the graphene cooler is going to win out,” she added. “Other materials out there are much more expensive, they’re not as thin and they don’t have such a high power factor.” The study was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.


Until recently, it seemed that we would be able to manage global warming-induced sea level rise through the end of the century. It would be problematic, of course, but manageable, particularly in industrialized nations like the U.S. However, troubling indications from the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets show that melting is taking place faster than previously thought and that entire glaciers — if not portions of the ice sheets themselves — are destabilizing. This has scientists increasingly worried that the consensus sea level rise estimates are too conservative. With sea level rise, as with other climate impacts, the uncertainties tend to skew toward the more severe end of the scale. So, it's time to consider some worst-case scenarios. SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming Recently, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) published an extreme high-end sea level rise scenario, showing 10 to 12 feet of sea level rise by 2100 around the U.S., compared to the previously published global average — which is closer to 8 feet — in that time period. The research and journalism group Climate Central took this projection and plotted out the stark ramifications in painstaking, and  terrifying, detail. "By the end of the century, oceans could submerge land [that's] home to more than 12 million Americans and $2 trillion in property," according to Ben Strauss, who leads the sea level rise program at Climate Central. Here's what major cities would look like with so much sea level rise: In an online report, Climate Central states that the impacts of such a high amount of sea level rise "would be devastating."  For example, Cape Canaveral, which is a crown jewel for NASA and now the private sector space industry, would be swallowed up by the Atlantic. Major universities, including MIT, would be underwater, as would President Trump's "southern White House" of Mar-a-Lago. In the West, San Francisco would be hard-hit, with San Francisco International Airport completely submerged. "More than 99 percent of today’s population in 252 coastal towns and cities would have their homes submerged, and property of more than half the population in 479 additional communities would also be underwater," the analysis, which has not been peer-reviewed, found.  In New York City, the average high tide would be a staggering 2 feet higher than the flood level experienced during Hurricane Sandy. More than 800,000 people would be flooded out of New York City alone.  Although the findings pertain to sea level rise through the end of the century, in reality sea levels would keep rising long after that, with a total increase of about 30 feet by 2200 for all coastal states, Climate Central found.  As for how likely this extreme scenario really is, here's what the report says:  "The extreme scenario is considered unlikely, but it is plausible. NOAA’s report and Antarctic research suggest that deep and rapid cuts to heat-trapping pollution would greatly reduce its chances."  More specifically, the NOAA projection says this high-end outlook has just a 0.1 percent chance of occurring under a scenario in which we keep emitting greenhouse gases at about the current rate. While a 1-in-1,000 chance outcome might seem nearly impossible to occur, recent events suggest otherwise.  For example, Hurricane Sandy slammed into the Mid-Atlantic in 2012 while following a track that was virtually unprecedented in storm history. In addition, California is estimated to have had just a 1 percent chance of climbing out of its deep drought in a one to two-year period, and it did just that this winter.  Robert Kopp, a sea level rise researcher at Rutgers University, whose projections formed the basis of the NOAA scenarios, said it's difficult to put exact odds on the extreme scenario.  "I would say that our knowledge about marine ice-sheet instability is too deeply uncertain for us to answer that question right now," Kopp said in an email. "We can come up with a physically plausible pathway that gets us to 2.5 meters [or 8.2 feet], we know it is more likely under higher emissions, but we don't have a good way of putting a probability on it." A paper published in the journal Nature in March found that if emissions of global warming pollutants peak in the next few years and are then reduced quickly thereafter, then there is a good chance that the melting of the Antarctic Ice Sheet would be drastically curtailed.  However, with the U.S., which is the second-largest emitter of greenhouse gases, backing away from making significant cuts under the Paris Climate Agreement, adhering to such an ambitious timetable is looking less realistic.  In order for NOAA's extreme scenario, and therefore Climate Central's maps, to turn into reality, there would need to be decades more of sustained high emissions of greenhouse gases plus more melting from Antarctica than is currently anticipated.  However, recent studies have raised questions about Antarctica's stability, as mild ocean waters eat away at floating ice shelves from below, freeing up glaciers well inland to flow faster into the sea.  "What's new is that we used to think 6- to 7 feet was the max *plausible* or *possible* sea level rise this century, and now we've roughly doubled that," Strauss said in an email. "The new Antarctic science says it's plausible."  "If you were to survey ice sheet experts today, instead of something like 5 to 10 years ago, I suspect you'd get a significantly higher probability than 0.1 percent," he said.  A study published in the journal Nature Climate Change last week found that sea level rise could prompt a wave of internal migration within the U.S., especially as people move from the hardest-hit states such as Florida, Louisiana and New York. It's long been known that Florida is ground zero for sea level rise impacts, but the Climate Central projections are even more pessimistic. The report shows that a whopping 5.6 million Floridians would be at risk before the end of the century under an extreme sea level rise scenario, about double the amount simulated in the study last week.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

MARSHALL, Minn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Schwan’s Company announced today that Tony Puri has been named executive vice president of SFC Global Supply Chain, Inc., a subsidiary of Schwan’s Company. In this role, Puri will be responsible for the strategic direction and performance of the company’s manufacturing facilities and distribution centers. He will also serve on the company’s executive leadership team. “Tony is a proven leader and has tremendous experience in the successful operations of manufacturing facilities throughout the world,” said Schwan’s Company CEO Dimitrios Smyrnios. “Our entire team is looking forward to working with him to deliver world-class service to our customers and increase our capacity for growth.” Puri brings more than 30 years of food-industry experience to his new role. Most recently, he served as vice president of global manufacturing for CSM Bakery Solutions, where he was responsible for the overall operations of 34 manufacturing facilities, and quality and engineering teams worldwide. Prior to CSM, he worked in leadership and general management roles with several global companies. He started his career with Ralston Purina before progressing to other leadership roles with Cadbury, Warner Lambert, Kraft and Mondelez International. He earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in biochemical and chemical engineering from Rutgers University. He also obtained a master’s degree in business administration, marketing and finance from Rockford College in Illinois. Puri is filling a role previously held by Doug Olsem, who recently accepted a newly created position leading Schwan’s sourcing, Contract Partner Sales business, travel and real estate teams.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

After months of college application tasks and an anxious waiting period, high school seniors are starting to receive college acceptance letters. Many students may be relieved, but the hard work isn't necessarily over. Now you need to make a decision. If you are lucky enough to receive multiple acceptances, you must choose one. With so many factors to consider, how can you ensure you're making the right choice for this major chapter in your life? While you don't want to put too much pressure on yourself, evaluate your options carefully. Two current undergraduates recently shared their college decision strategies to help you prepare to pick a college before National College Decision Day on May 1. [Get expert tips and advice on making the college decision.] -- Identify your deal breakers: Before you can make any decision, large or small, you need to determine which factors are most important to you and key to you having a great education experience. You may have created a list of criteria when you put together a short list of colleges to apply to, but now you need to differentiate between the elements you simply like and those you feel you can't live without. Jump-start your decision process by reviewing each school based on the deal breakers you identify. Which schools offer the things you can't live without and which don't? Mina Shenouda, a senior at Rutgers University--New Brunswick, said via email he wanted a specific type of college location. "I wanted to choose a school that was safe and that also had fun stuff to do if I wanted to explore other areas," he said. Shenouda also said it was important to him to find a school that offered the best programs for his goals, including his potential major, minor and extracurricular activities. Madeleine Wagner, a junior at the University of North Georgia, said via email the most important factors for her were affordability and opportunities within the school, specifically a biology program. "When I first sat down in my biology class when I started the university, other students around me were immediately discussing the material and making study groups," she explained. "That's when I felt I made the right choice, surrounding myself with like-minded people who understood me." [Follow these 10 steps to picking the right college.] -- Research and ask last-minute questions: As decision day approaches, you still may have questions. Don't be afraid to dig further for answers to these questions or reach out to the school. As you evaluate schools based on your list of must-haves, you may come across information that you didn't know to research before or that you were unaware of. But if you can't find the answers you need, don't be shy about asking the school. Shenouda advises asking questions so you are as prepared as possible for college. "There are a few elements that I wish I had prepared for when I was still in high school. First and foremost, I wish I had looked into the requirements more thoroughly in regards to my major, as well as general core requirements," he said. "I was a little clueless about it at first and didn't necessarily know how it worked, which made scheduling classes later on slightly difficult." Consider contacting the appropriate departments at the schools you're looking at to confirm what the requirements for your intended major are like and if you feel comfortable with those paths. Financial aid opportunities and general facts about tuition are other aspects you may wish to ask more questions about. Shenouda noted this was an important consideration as he chose between schools. "The cost of education was my biggest determining factor," he said. "You don't want to be paying student loans for the entirety of your life, so you have to choose a school accordingly." [Check out the colleges where students are the most eager to enroll.] -- Make the decision for you: Like many students, you may have various people, including family and friends, giving input on your college decision. While many of your trusted relatives and peers may have valuable insights that can contribute to your decision, ultimately the choice is yours and yours alone. Only you can fully realize which aspects of a college will make you truly happy and fulfilled, so keep that at the front of your mind.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

With some strains of bacteria becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics, contamination by touching infected surfaces or coming into contact with airborne microbes is fast becoming a real threat to public health. Hand-sanitizer liquids and masks may go some way toward reducing this problem, but clothes, equipment, and other items can all harbor disease and are not readily cleanable with standard chemicals or methods. To help address this situation, scientists at Rutgers University have come up with a way to produce paper-based plasma generators. These could be worn on clothing or fitted to equipment, to zap any bug they come into contact with cheaply and easily. Already high-tech sensors are able to detect the presence of harmful E. coli bacteria, and devices that can kill them with solar power or even fry them on the spot with a combination of gold nanodisks and lasers. However, as capable as these methods may be, their cost, complexity, and limited effectiveness on large surface areas reduces their practical deployment on a large scale. Paper-based sanitizers, on the other hand, could be cheap and flexible enough to be suitable for incorporation in clothing that sterilizes itself, devices that automatically sanitize laboratory equipment, or even electronic bandages that help heal wounds better by keeping out infection altogether. Motivated by the likes of the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa, the Rutgers scientists sought to produce active protective appliances and methods to minimize the spread of infectious diseases that were both inexpensive and easy to produce. The research resulted in an electronic disinfectant material made of paper coated with thin layers of aluminum honeycomb patterns that act as electrodes to produce the plasma. Plasma, or ionized gas, is formed when a high-voltage charge ionizes a gas, in this case ordinary air, so that electrons are torn from their atoms. This results in a high-energy field of electrons and ions that, in this case, is used to vaporize any bacteria that comes into contact with it. Whilst paper may seem a counter-intuitive choice for such a device, its intrinsic fibrous nature and porous interior actually provides a large area through which gas may permeate. This, in turn, helps keep the the plasma fuelled whilst keeping the whole system adequately cooled. "Paper is an ancient material, but it has unique attributes for new, high-tech applications," said Aaron Mazzeo, assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Rutgers University. "We found that by applying high voltage to stacked sheets of metallized paper, we were able to generate plasma, which is a combination of heat, ultraviolet radiation and ozone that kill microbes." Experiments conducted by the team at Rutgers showed that their paper devices wiped out more than 99 percent of a yeast microbe known as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and killed more than 99.9 percent of E. coli bacteria cells. Though E. coli bacteria is one of the most prolific species of microbes on the planet, most strains are harmless and many contribute to the health of the human gut. The nasty types, such as the ones that can cause diarrhea, pneumonia, infections of the urinary tract, and other debilitating or life-threatening illnesses, are the ones that we require protection from. In particular, we need a safe way to both halt these microbes in their tracks and stop them spreading. "Preliminary results showed that our sanitizers can kill spores from bacteria, which are hard to kill using conventional sterilization methods," said Qiang (Richard) Chen, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Plant Biology in Rutgers' School of Environmental and Biological Sciences. "Our next phase is to vigorously test how effective our sanitizer system is in killing spores," continued James F. White Jr., professor of plant pathology in the Department of Plant Biology at Rutgers. Ongoing research at Rutgers aims to produce devices that mimic the way skin protects us from microbes and bacteria outside the body, while detecting the inputs of touch, pressure, temperature, and moisture. According to the scientists, these detectors may be formed into covers for prosthetics, parts of buildings, or the surfaces of vehicles, making it possible to sterilize machinery, robots, or pieces of equipment before they go into contaminated areas and again when they come out. Similarly, surfaces in buildings could be constantly cycled with plasma cleaning to kill any microbes that land on them. The results of this study were recently published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. The video below details more of the research and construction of the metallized paper plasma generators by the Rutgers University team.


News Article | March 27, 2017
Site: www.csmonitor.com

On the left is an image of the global circulation pattern on a normal day. On the right is the image of the global circulation pattern when extreme weather occurs. The pattern on the right shows extreme patterns of wind speeds going north and south, while the normal pattern on the left shows moderate speed winds in both the north and south directions. Flood survivors negotiate a flooded road at Muzaffargarh, in central Pakistan, on Aug. 19, 2010. The floods that hit Pakistan in the summer of 2010 took 2,000 lives and affected 20 million people. —Whether a specific extreme weather event can be linked to climate change rarely gets a straightforward answer from climate scientists or meteorologists. It's complicated, they'll say, but that doesn't mean there isn't a relationship. "Climate scientists have been willing to link the general increase in certain types of weather extremes (heat waves, droughts, and floods) to climate change in a generic sense," says Michael Mann, an atmospheric scientist at Pennsylvania State University. Rising global temperatures and other climate forces can certainly change the conditions that underlie weather, which climate scientists have said can lead to a change in the frequency of a type of weather event. But Dr. Mann and colleagues report that there is a more direct way that climate change is impacting weather extremes: by altering the movement of the jet stream. "Our work shows that climate change isn’t just leading to more extreme weather through the usual mechanisms that have been described in the literature (warmer temperatures means more heat waves, hotter summers mean worse drought, warmer atmosphere holds more moisture so when it rains or snows we tend to see greater amounts of precipitation)," Mann writes in an email to The Christian Science Monitor. "We show that, in addition to those effects, climate change is changing the behavior of the jet stream in a way that favors more extreme persistent weather anomalies." And, in a paper published Monday in the journal Scientific Reports, Mann and his colleagues suggest that this climate change-driven shift in the jet stream influenced the 2003 heat wave in Europe, flooding in Pakistan and a heat wave in Russia simultaneously in 2010, and the Texas heat wave in 2011. "This study convincingly demonstrates a mechanism connecting climate change with extreme weather during summer over Northern Hemisphere continents, affecting billions of people," Jennifer Francis, a climate scientist at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J., who was not involved in the research, writes in an email to the Monitor. The jet stream, which Mann describes as a "ribbon-like air current that travels eastward … in the lower part of the atmosphere where weather happens," exists because of the difference in air temperatures between the subtropic and subarctic regions. The eastward-flowing air isn't one completely steady band. Slow-moving waves that travel from north to south often appear across the ribbon of air. It is those particularly large undulations, called Rossby waves, that researchers link with extreme weather, because of the intensely low or high pressure systems they bring with them. In a warming world, these Rossby waves are getting stuck in one place for a long period of time, Mann and his colleagues say. And this means that a region under the low pressure part of these waves will experience intense, prolonged rainfall resulting in flooding. The regions under the high pressure systems will be stuck with hot, dry conditions conducive to drought and wildfires. What's making these waves static, or at least slowing them down? Mann points to the warming Arctic. The tropics aren't warming as much as the Arctic, so the temperature gradient from north-to-south is less extreme. As the temperature differences that create the jet stream decline, the jet stream's dynamics change. This relationship was previously proposed by German climate researchers in 2013. But Mann and his colleagues have built on this idea by identifying a fingerprint related to these static, or particularly slow-moving, waves. The researchers found that the pattern of these fingerprints in the real-world data for recent extreme weather events matched simulations of the influence of anthropogenic greenhouse gases, indicating that climate change is indeed influential in altering the jet stream dynamics. Kevin Trenberth, senior scientist in the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) who was not involved in the research, cautions that teasing out the climate change signal from the noise of natural variability in a particular weather system can be tricky. "Weather systems occur naturally, in terms of the storms themselves, the phenomena, etc.," he writes in an email to the Monitor. "But their impacts are undoubtedly altered by climate change: higher temperatures, heat waves, wildfires; stronger rains (and snows), more intense droughts, and further, the storms may be more intense." Although the impact of climate change on the temperature, and rainfall intensity is undoubtable, Dr. Trenberth says, the causal relationship is less clear when considering the dynamics (the storms themselves and atmospheric waves) of a weather system. "There is a no doubt that there are relationships, but it is not so clear what is the cause; i.e. the change in waves, the Arctic and so forth are all part of the same thing: and the change in Arctic is likely more a result not a cause," he writes. Climate scientists and meteorologists have been hesitant to draw a direct link between extreme storms and climate change, although they say unusual weather is consistent with models of a changing climate. But Dr. Francis and David Easterling, chief of the Scientific Services Division of the National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration’s (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information, who also was not involved in the study, say this research is eroding that hesitation. "This work adds a substantial layer to the pile of research suggesting that climate change is already causing an increase in certain types of extreme weather events. Moreover, as society continues along the present path of unabated fossil fuel burning, weather will become even more extreme," Francis says. "I think it certainly provides more evidence towards it," Dr. Easterling agrees in a phone interview with the Monitor. "Is it a definitive answer? No, not necessarily.... But it's beginning to draw that link." "This is beginning to give you a dynamical meteorology reason why we may see more of these events," Easterling says. This research gives us an idea about the mechanism behind these changes, rather than just statistics, he says. Mann and his team have focused their work on identifying the link in historical data, but the same technique could have applications in predicting future extreme weather from climate trends. "Indeed, that’s precisely the analysis we are doing now, performing a similar analysis but using instead the climate model projections for the next century," Mann says. "Stay tuned." It's not just about long-term climate trends, Easterling adds. "If meteorologists that are actually doing forecasting can look at this and begin to see these patterns, they can do a better job of forecasting heatwaves and/or extended wet periods" in the nearer future as well. Regardless of timescale, these sorts of predictions could help save lives and expense, Francis says. Extreme weather affects insurance costs, food security, and political stability, among other things, she says. "Knowing the reason for the increased frequency of extreme summer weather events – such as heat waves, droughts, and floods – and knowing these events will become only more frequent and intense in the future, will inform decisionmakers and help leaders of governments and businesses to prepare for them," Francis says. "This knowledge, if acted upon, could save lives and [prevent] suffering."


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has released its analysis of New Jersey’s best online colleges and universities for 2017. 16 four-year schools made the list, with Rutgers University, Saint Peter’s University, College of Saint Elizabeth, Seton Hall University and Caldwell University scoring the highest. Of the 9 two-year colleges that also made the list Mercer County Community College, Camden County College, Rowan College at Burlington County, Atlantic Cape Community College and Passaic County Community College were the top five schools. “These New Jersey schools have demonstrated their excellence not only for offering outstanding online certificates and degrees but also for providing high-quality student resources,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “For students with geographical limitations or busy schedules, these online programs maintain the same high standards as more traditional, on-campus learning options.” To earn a spot on the “Best Online Schools in New Jersey” list, colleges and universities must be accredited, public or private not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also judged based on additional data points such as the availability of financial aid opportunities, academic counseling services, student/teacher ratios and graduation rates. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: The Best Online Four-Year Schools in New Jersey for 2017 include the following: Caldwell University Centenary College College of Saint Elizabeth Fairleigh Dickinson University-Metropolitan Campus Felician College Georgian Court University Monmouth University Montclair State University New Jersey City University New Jersey Institute of Technology Rowan University Rutgers University Saint Peter's University Seton Hall University Thomas Edison State University William Paterson University of New Jersey The Best Online Two-Year Schools in New Jersey for 2017 include the following: Atlantic Cape Community College Bergen Community College Brookdale Community College Camden County College Cumberland County College Mercer County Community College Ocean County College Passaic County Community College Rowan College at Burlington County ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Researchers have invented an inexpensive, effective way to kill bacteria and sanitize surfaces with devices made of paper. “Paper is an ancient material, but it has unique attributes for new, high-tech applications,” says Aaron Mazzeo, an assistant professor in Rutgers University department of mechanical and aerospace engineering. “We found that by applying high voltage to stacked sheets of metallized paper, we were able to generate plasma, which is a combination of heat, ultraviolet radiation, and ozone that kill microbes.” In the future, paper-based sanitizers may be suitable for clothing that sterilizes itself, devices that sanitize laboratory equipment, and smart bandages to heal wounds, among other uses, the study says. The motivation for this study was to create personal protective equipment that might contain the spread of infectious diseases, such as the devastating 2014 outbreak of Ebola in West Africa. The researchers’ invention consists of paper with thin layers of aluminum and hexagon/honeycomb patterns that serve as electrodes to produce the plasma, or ionized gas. The fibrous and porous nature of the paper allows gas to permeate it, fueling the plasma and facilitating cooling. “To our knowledge, we’re the first to use paper as a base to generate plasma,” says Jingjin Xie, the study’s lead author and a doctoral candidate in the department of mechanical and aerospace engineering. In experiments, the paper-based sanitizers killed more than 99 percent of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (a yeast species) and more than 99.9 percent of E. coli bacteria cells. Most E. coli bacteria are harmless and are an important part of a healthy human intestinal tract. However, some types of E. coli can make us sick. “Preliminary results showed that our sanitizers can kill spores from bacteria, which are hard to kill using conventional sterilization methods,” says Qiang (Richard) Chen, study coauthor and a doctoral candidate in the department of plant biology in Rutgers’ School of Environmental and Biological Sciences. “Our next phase is to vigorously test how effective our sanitizer system is in killing spores,” says James F. White Jr., study coauthor and professor of plant pathology in plant biology. Mazzeo says one of the goals of their ongoing research is to make sensors that resemble how human and animal skin provides protection from external microbes and bacteria, while detecting input (touch, force, temperature, and moisture) from environmental surroundings. Such sensors might cover parts of prosthetics, buildings, or vehicles. It also might be possible to sterilize vehicles, robots, or devices before they enter contamination-prone environments and when they come out to keep them from contaminating people and clean environments. The scientists will explore the design and fabrication of paper-based sensors for wearable devices capable of measuring brain waves and sweat to determine human alertness and stress. Their future work should lead to electronic devices that bridge the gap between machines and humans, while creating new processing techniques for renewable paper products. The researchers detail their invention in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Coauthors are from Rutgers and the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

One gene has been strongly linked to Tourette's syndrome and several more are also likely to be involved, the largest genomic study on the condition has found. Tourette's is a neurological condition that affects about 1 in 100 people. Symptoms of the syndrome include physical or verbal tics, which are particularly difficult during periods of stress, anxiety or tiredness, according to the NHS. People who have Tourette's often also have conditions such as depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder or ADHD. The underlying causes of Tourette's have been very unclear until now. "We knew that there were genetic factors, because it runs in families, and there is a higher rate in identical twins. That's about it," study author Gary Heiman of Rutgers University in the US told IBTimes UK. Don't miss: Time travel has been proven mathematically possible – we just need exotic matter to build a machine The genomic analysis looked at hundreds of families where there was at least one child who had Tourette's but the parents did not have the condition. They sequenced the children's genomes to identify mutations that had arisen by chance in genes after the children were conceived – so these mutations weren't shared with the parents. The complexity of the disorder is similar to other neuropsychological conditions, such as autism. Most popular: Scientists reveal the first ever map of the bipolar brain "It used to be thought one gene caused one disorder, like for sickle cell anaemia or Huntingdon's. Now we have a more complex disorders like Tourette's and other neuropsychological disorders, where many different genes cause different symptoms." In children with Tourette's, there were many more harmful mutations across a range of genes than in children who didn't have the condition, who were studied for comparison. A total of about 400 genes were linked to the condition to some degree. Four genes were more closely linked, with one of them standing out in particular. These genes were involved in brain development and memory, and were found in more than one of the families in the study. "That's a concept of lightning striking twice in the same location," Heiman said. "It's such a rare event that that would be very notable." It's hoped that the findings will eventually lead to better treatments for the syndrome. At present, treatments include talking therapies, muscle relaxant medications and in extreme cases surgery. The next steps are studies in a larger group of people to see whether the genes identified are all working in the same pathways in brain development, and hone in on their exact functions. "Once we can clarify that, maybe treatments could be developed or personalised to what the mutations might be in a particular individual." The research is published in the journal Neuron. You may be interested in:


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

A drug used to treat bipolar disorder and other forms of depression may help to preserve brain function and prevent nerve cells from dying in people with a traumatic brain injury, according to a new Rutgers University study. In research published in Scientific Reports, Rutgers scientists discovered that lithium - used as a mood stabilizer and to treat depression and bipolar disorder - and rapamycin, a treatment for some forms of cancer, protected nerve cells in the brain and stopped the chemical glutamate from sending signals to other cells and creating further brain cell damage. "Many medications now used for those suffering with traumatic brain injury focus on treating the symptoms and stopping the pain instead of protecting any further damage from occurring," said lead author Bonnie Firestein, professor in the Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience in the School of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. "We wanted to find a drug that could protect the cells and keep them from dying." According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability in the United States with an estimated 1.7 people sustaining a TBI annually. About 30 percent of all deaths due to injury are due, in part, to a TBI. The symptoms of a TBI can include impaired thinking or memory, personality changes and depression, as well as vision and hearing problems. The CDC reports that every day 153 people in the U.S. die from injuries that include a TBI. Children and older adults are at the highest risk, according to the CDC. When a TBI occurs, Firestein said, a violent blow to the head can result in the release of abnormally high concentrations of glutamate, which under normal circumstances is an important chemical for learning and memory. But an overproduction of glutamate, she said, causes toxicity which leads to cell damage and death. In the Rutgers research, scientists discovered that when these two FDA-approved medications were added to damaged cell cultures in the laboratory, the glutamate was not able to send messages between nerve cells. This stopped cell damage and death, Firestein said. Further research needs to be done, she said, in animals and humans to determine if these drugs could help prevent brain damage and nerve cell death in humans after a traumatic brain injury. "The most common traumatic brain injury that people deal with every day is concussion which affects thousands of children each year," said Firestein. "Concussions are often hard to diagnose in children because they are not as vocal, which is why it is critical to find drugs that work to prevent long-term damage."


-- The American Conference on Diversity is pleased to announce the addition of Gloria McDonald to the staff. In her role as Associate Administrator, she will oversee daily operations and help expand the statewide nonprofit's diversity and inclusion education and training services."The American Conference on Diversity is excited to have Gloria's expertise and extensive D&I experience on our team," says President & CEO Elizabeth Williams-Riley.Ms. McDonald is dedicated to the vision and mission of the American Conference on Diversity. Her more than 20 years of practice within multiple changing work environments has included strategy development and well as the management of staff and resources. Prior to joining the ACOD staff, Ms. McDonald served as a consultant, facilitator, and ambassador for workplace diversity programs offered by the organization. Ms. McDonald has a track record of captivating audiences with her transformational approaches to the business and culture of inclusion.Ms. McDonald's career path includes working with Prudential Financial, one of the nation's leading financial corporations, to build its capacity to effectively implement strategies for employees and national and international clients. As an independent development consultant, she has worked in the fields of advertising and marketing, law, social justice, and higher education. She earned a Master's degree in Organization Development from American University/NTL Institute, a Master's degree in Library and Information Science from Rutgers University, and a BA degree from Brown University.Ms. McDonald was selected as a 2013 Lead New Jersey Fellow. Through the Edward J Bloustein School of Public Policy at Rutgers, the State University, she joins professionals from across the state in using their best ideas to build a stronger future for New Jersey in areas including economic development, health and human services, government and politics, the environment, and the arts."There's nothing better than joining a team that aligns with one's strongest beliefs and values," says Ms. McDonald. "I'm looking forward to contributing to the meaningful work that the American Conference on Diversity does to build inclusive workplaces, communities, and schools."Please join us in welcoming Gloria McDonald to the organization.The American Conference on Diversity is dedicated to building just and inclusive schools, workplaces, and communities through awareness, education, and advocacy. The nonprofit organization was founded in 1948 as the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Today the programs, services, and initiatives of the American Conference on Diversity are among the most important work focused on creating a more inclusive society. It is the unfinished business of living in a highly diverse nation: educating and empowering our next generation of leaders, enhancing our workplaces, and helping to create inclusive communities. Visit www.AmericanConferenceonDiversity.org to learn more.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Over the past two or three years, a great deal of attention has been given to transgender issues. In the United States, the transgender population includes an estimated 150,000 transgender youth. A Heritage Foundation report argues that Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 does not require schools to protect these youth from discrimination on the basis of gender identity. The report also fails to provide any insight into actual gender identity policies in schools. Gender Identity Policies in Schools: What Congress, the Courts, and the Trump Administration Should Do was reviewed by Robert Kim, who is a William T. Grant Distinguished Fellow at Rutgers University, and who was until recently Deputy Assistant Secretary for Strategic Operations and Outreach at the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights. The report criticizes the Obama Administration’s decision to enforce Title IX to protect transgender students, and it urges the Trump Administration and courts to take a very different approach, keeping gender identity protections for these students out of federal laws. Yet while transgender youth are at the center of this report on gender identity policy, these youth somehow go wholly unexamined by the authors. The report never acknowledges or addresses: (a) legal developments that support the argument that gender identity discrimination is a form of sex discrimination; (b) the near-consensus within the medical, scientific, and educational communities concerning how transgender students should be treated; and (c) other research and literature shedding light on the appropriate care for and education of transgender youth. The review also explains that the report erroneously asserts that transgender-inclusive policies will embolden men to enter women’s facilities to assault or abuse them. What is entirely missing from this report – and what policymakers and educators urgently need — is guidance in an area that may be new or unfamiliar to them. Fortunately, many states and districts have adopted positive gender-identity-related laws, policies, and practices that answer questions and serve as useful guidance for other jurisdictions about how to successfully integrate transgender students in schools. The review concludes that the Heritage report is simply not a research-based document on establishing appropriate policies related to gender identity. It is merely an advocacy document urging a more limited interpretation of a key federal civil rights law while never engaging with the issues facing transgender youth. Find the review by Robert Kim at: http://nepc.colorado.edu/thinktank/review-gender Find Gender Identity Policies in Schools: What Congress, the Courts, and the Trump Administration Should Do, by Ryan Anderson and Melody Wood, published by the Heritage Foundation, at: http://www.heritage.org/sites/default/files/2017-03/BG3201.pdf The National Education Policy Center (NEPC) Think Twice Think Tank Review Project (http://thinktankreview.org) provides the public, policymakers, and the press with timely, academically sound reviews of selected publications. The project is made possible in part by support provided by the Great Lakes Center for Education Research and Practice: http://www.greatlakescenter.org The National Education Policy Center (NEPC), housed at the University of Colorado Boulder School of Education, produces and disseminates high-quality, peer-reviewed research to inform education policy discussions. Visit us at: http://nepc.colorado.edu


The present application discloses the first rare-earth-free metal organic framework (MOF) yellow phosphors that can be effectively excited by blue light and assembled in a white light emission (WLED) device with a blue chip. The compounds of the present invention exhibit significantly enhanced emission intensity compared to the constituent ligand and high quantum yield and high thermal and moisture stability and photoluminescence. The invention also includes light emitting devices comprising any of these MOF yellow phosphors and methods of preparing these compounds and devices.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

People in the US and beyond concerned about climate change may be alarmed at the Trump administration’s policies and attitudes – but there are plenty of businesses and innovators doing work at various scales. From solar to fake meat and low-carbon concrete, Oliver Milman explores some of the best examples of climate change-tackling innovations and innovators. Large-scale solar is a booming industry in the US, with the sector now employing twice the number of people involved with coal mining. But the decarbonization of America’s energy system is happening at a more local level, too. There are 25 states with at least one community solar project online, according to the Solar Energy Industries Association, and 2016 was a bumper year, with 218 MW added. “It’s picking up speed, and there’s a lot in the pipeline, so it’ll be a mainstream driver of solar in the future,” said Alex Hobson, a spokeswoman for the association. “There is room to grow and there’s a lot of interest from people who never thought about solar, such as those renting or who are moving out of their buildings in the near future.” Community solar works by allowing several people, such as those in a building with several apartments, to derive energy from a solar project installed on their building or elsewhere. Some utilities provide customers the ability to purchase the renewable energy from a shared facility, while in other cases groups of people band together to take advantage of state and federal incentives to make the investment themselves. California, Colorado, Massachusetts and Minnesota are currently leading the way. Agricultural activities currently contribute about 10% of America’s total greenhouse gas emissions each year, largely due to the methane expelled by cattle. Americans are eating less beef than they did a decade ago, but further reductions would be handy if the US is to reduce its emissions to levels that would help avoid dangerous climate change. A raft of new meatless meat options have been made available for those who are reluctant about going vegetarian but can’t quite stomach the impact of meat production. The Impossible Burger, a fake meat offering, has gained plenty of headlines due to the fact it “bleeds” much like the real thing. The $12 burger, backed by investors including Bill Gates and Google, has confused some diners but it’s hoped it will help make people cut down on beef, saving land, water and emissions in the process. There is plenty of competition, too, from brands such as Beyond Meat, Gardein and the venerable Tofurky. Worldwide use of concrete is soaring, largely due to a building boom in China and, to a lesser extent, India. In fact, China has used more cement since 2011 than the US did during the entire 20th century. The greenhouse gas emissions in its production are significant, prompting researchers to come up with a greener alternative. In February, Rutgers University’s Richard Riman announced a new technology that can make a variety of materials, including concrete. Combined with cement, the product can reduce the carbon footprint of cement and concrete by up to 70%, according to the university. “I looked at how shellfish make ceramics at low-temperature, like carbonate crystals, and then looked at what people can do with water to make landing strips in Alaska, and I said we should be able to do this with ceramics, but use a low-temperature chemical process that involves water,” Riman said. “When you can develop technologies that are safe and easy to use, it’s a game-changer.” A technology company called WISErg has developed a product called the Harvester, which transforms food waste into fertilizer than can be applied to lawns. The product, launched in 2014, has helped the company get more than $30m in investment. In the same area, a startup in Connecticut is working on replacing gasoline-run mowers with a solar-charged alternative that, for each lawn, saves emissions equivalent to those of a car on the road for 12,000 miles. Wind currently supplies around 5% of America’s electricity but the sector is on the up thanks to the introduction of offshore wind farms. In December, the first US offshore wind turbines started turning near a small island off the coast of Rhode Island. The Block Island wind farm is small – capable of powering about 17,000 homes – but has opened up the way for further developments along the coast. Donald Trump isn’t a fan – he has fought a losing battle to prevent a wind farm near one of his golf courses in Scotland – but the falling cost of turbines is making offshore wind more competitive. Maryland is currently mulling two different proposals for offshore wind which would dwarf the Block Island development. Electric vehicle sales jumped 70% in 2016, following a disappointing previous year, with more than 30 different models on sale by the end of the year. Tesla, Chevrolet, Nissan and Ford lead the way, with more than half of sales occurring in California, which mandates a certain slice of auto sales must be electric. Continued growth could depend on whether a federal tax credit is extended but the electric vehicle market is maturing from a niche oddity to a competitive international field. The Chinese government is calling on auto manufacturers to sell more electric vehicles to improve air quality, with Ford announcing it will electrify 70% of the vehicles sold in the country by 2025. There’s still a long way to go – many drivers still worry about the availability of recharging stations – but this is yet another clean energy market that America could lead in. Even the sober assessment of the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) leaves much to guesswork when it comes to meeting emissions reduction goals. If the world is to avoid 2C or more of warming, as-yet undeveloped technology will need to be used to extract carbon dioxide from the air at some point, due to the patchy progress in cutting emissions. One desperate intervention could be solar engineering, which is being studied by a team led by David Keith at Harvard University. The researchers are looking at how chemical compounds, such as limestone dust, can be dispersed in the atmosphere, thereby scattering sunlight and sparing an area below from its heat. How this can be achieved, and whether it is even desirable to do so, is an ongoing debate. But if we continue to cook our planet, then governments may have to turn to the likes of Keith to help avert the worst.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A drug used to treat bipolar disorder and other forms of depression may help to preserve brain function and prevent nerve cells from dying in people with a traumatic brain injury, according to a new Rutgers University study. In research published in Scientific Reports, Rutgers scientists discovered that lithium - used as a mood stabilizer and to treat depression and bipolar disorder - and rapamycin, a treatment for some forms of cancer, protected nerve cells in the brain and stopped the chemical glutamate from sending signals to other cells and creating further brain cell damage. "Many medications now used for those suffering with traumatic brain injury focus on treating the symptoms and stopping the pain instead of protecting any further damage from occurring," said lead author Bonnie Firestein, professor in the Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience in the School of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. "We wanted to find a drug that could protect the cells and keep them from dying." According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability in the United States with an estimated 1.7 million people sustaining a TBI annually. About 30 percent of all deaths due to injury are due, in part, to a TBI. The symptoms of a TBI can include impaired thinking or memory, personality changes and depression, as well as vision and hearing problems. The CDC reports that every day 153 people in the U.S. die from injuries that include a TBI. Children and older adults are at the highest risk, according to the CDC. When a TBI occurs, Firestein said, a violent blow to the head can result in the release of abnormally high concentrations of glutamate, which under normal circumstances is an important chemical for learning and memory. But an overproduction of glutamate, she said, causes toxicity which leads to cell damage and death. In the Rutgers research, scientists discovered that when these two FDA-approved medications were added to damaged cell cultures in the laboratory, the glutamate was not able to send messages between nerve cells. This stopped cell damage and death, Firestein said. Further research needs to be done, she said, in animals and humans to determine if these drugs could help prevent brain damage and nerve cell death in humans after a traumatic brain injury. "The most common traumatic brain injury that people deal with every day is concussion which affects thousands of children each year," said Firestein. "Concussions are often hard to diagnose in children because they are not as vocal, which is why it is critical to find drugs that work to prevent long-term damage." The Rutgers research was funded by a three-year grant from the New Jersey Commission on Brain Injury Research. The commission is funded, in part, by traffic tickets for moving violations like speeding, using a cell phone or driving without a license, and provides $1 to the fund from every ticket issued.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

BEDFORD, MA--(Marketwired - May 04, 2017) - The MITRE Corporation has named Peter Sherlock as its Chief Operating Officer. As COO, Sherlock will shape MITRE's operations for increased speed, agility, decisiveness and accountability, to better position the company for the scale and complexity of challenges it addresses on behalf of its federal sponsors. He is responsible for MITRE's operations, including finance, human resources, information technology, security, strategy and business analytics. MITRE operates several research and development centers for federal agencies, providing innovative, practical solutions for some of our nation's most critical challenges in defense and intelligence, aviation, civil systems, homeland security, the judiciary, healthcare, and cybersecurity. Sherlock, who is based at MITRE's Bedford, Massachusetts headquarters near Boston, will continue to represent MITRE within the Massachusetts technology and healthcare communities, engaging with local universities, businesses, and government officials on topics such as cybersecurity and digital healthcare. He will continue to develop partnerships with key organizations in the local innovation ecosystem to seek new ideas from the area to address national challenges, and to share with other innovation centers across the country. Dr. Jason Providakes, MITRE President and Chief Executive Officer, said, "As we take on greater challenges as a company -- on a national and global level -- our ability to move quickly and decisively is critical. Pete's experience in a variety of roles inside MITRE, and elsewhere in industry, make him the right leader for this role. And he has found many ways to make MITRE a key contributor to the Boston innovation community." Sherlock originally joined MITRE in 1986 and most recently served as MITRE's Senior Vice President for the Center for National Security Programs & Technology and Director of MITRE's Bedford operations. His responsibilities included the workforce technical work program for MITRE's national security work. Sherlock's previous roles within MITRE included Vice President of the Command and Control Center within the National Security Engineering Center, Executive Director for Integration in the Defense Department's FFRDC, and Executive Director of U.S. Army programs. From 1997 to 2002, Sherlock held executive positions with General Instrument (purchased by Motorola), including Vice President and General Manager of the Cable Network Router business unit. Prior to rejoining MITRE in 2003, he co-founded an early-stage startup developing a distributed Web content access system. Sherlock holds a Bachelor's degree (1982) and a Master's degree (1986) in electrical engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and an MBA from Rutgers University (1995). The MITRE Corporation is a not-for-profit organization that operates research and development centers sponsored by the federal government. Learn more about MITRE.


​Thrivest Funding, LLC (“Thrivest”) is proud to announce that its President and CIO Joseph Genovesi has been appointed to the governing board of directors of the Big Brothers Big Sisters Independence Region in Philadelphia. As one of the earliest youth mentoring organizations in the Philadelphia area, the Independence Region agency is highly regarded among the community for its work helping at-risk youth. Mr. Genovesi has been a volunteer with the organization since 2001, and joined the board of directors for the Big Brothers Big Sisters Foundation of New Jersey in February 2013. With more than 15 years’ experience in the alternative investment industry, Mr. Genovesi cofounded Thrivest in 2015. He earned an MBA in finance from Rutgers University and a BS in finance from Villanova University. He is a council member of Villanova University’s Center for Innovation, Creativity and Entrepreneurship. Big Brothers Big Sisters is a national organization based in Tampa, FL with offices all over the country. Its mission is to help at-risk youth through its youth mentoring program which helps children of all ages in communities across the country. It is ranked by Forbes Magazine as one of the largest charities worldwide.​ ​ ​Thrivest is a leading provider of flexible financial options to help businesses and individuals meet their cash flow needs. They provide a customized approach to serving the financial needs of their clients via a proprietary suite of legal funding and receivable acceleration products. Through legal and specialty finance, Thrivest provides financial solutions to businesses, professionals, and consumers alike. For more information, please visit https://thrivest.com or call 267-457-4540.


News Article | April 23, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

New Children’s Book Teaches Children How to Fit in and Helps Fight Cancer Showing that it’s not easy to navigate the pecking order of a new place, this fun story deals with the challenges of being the new chicken in the coop. Shellie was inspired to write the tale and draw the illustrations after observing the quirky behaviors of her own chickens. “ She also plans to donate copies of the book to local schools and libraries this year. About the Author: Shellie McSloy currently lives with her husband at Spring Hills Farm in Cortland County, NY with their horses, cows, pet dog, and of course their chickens. Shellie has a Bachelor’s degree from Rutgers University and a degree in Elementary Education from Keystone College. Her writings can also be found in Farm & Ranch Living Magazine. Book Description: Fun at the farm! It is tough being the new kid, or um chicken, in town. Just ask Penny. Follow Penny and her feathered friends as they navigate the ins and outs of the hen house, going up against Helga the Head Hen. Can Penny find a way for her, and her sisters, to fit in? Inspiration comes from an unlikely source, and a game is set. Join the chickens and all the farm animals in a goal scoring good time as they learn about meeting challenges and making new friends. Cortland, NY, April 23, 2017 --( PR.com )-- When Central New York resident Shellie McSloy was getting ready to publish her first children’s book, she looked for an organization that supported children in need, and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital came to mind. With the release of her new book, “The Peach Soccer Game,” Shellie will donate 10% of the royalties to St. Jude’s on behalf of Spring Hills Farm. What better way for kids to help other kids than by selecting this story.Showing that it’s not easy to navigate the pecking order of a new place, this fun story deals with the challenges of being the new chicken in the coop. Shellie was inspired to write the tale and draw the illustrations after observing the quirky behaviors of her own chickens. “ The Peach Soccer Game ” is available on Amazon.com.She also plans to donate copies of the book to local schools and libraries this year.About the Author: Shellie McSloy currently lives with her husband at Spring Hills Farm in Cortland County, NY with their horses, cows, pet dog, and of course their chickens. Shellie has a Bachelor’s degree from Rutgers University and a degree in Elementary Education from Keystone College. Her writings can also be found in Farm & Ranch Living Magazine.Book Description:Fun at the farm! It is tough being the new kid, or um chicken, in town. Just ask Penny. Follow Penny and her feathered friends as they navigate the ins and outs of the hen house, going up against Helga the Head Hen. Can Penny find a way for her, and her sisters, to fit in? Inspiration comes from an unlikely source, and a game is set. Join the chickens and all the farm animals in a goal scoring good time as they learn about meeting challenges and making new friends. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Spring Hills Farm


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

In recent years, research into the myriad complexities of the brain and neurophysiology has gained momentum at NJIT across diverse disciplines, including biology, biomedical engineering, mathematical sciences and computing. With the formal inauguration of the university's Institute for Brain and Neuroscience Research (IBNR) in March, the efforts of NJIT researchers to increase basic understanding of the brain that could lead to new healing therapies for related injuries and disease will be more sharply focused and closely coordinated. As the primary home for all neuroscience initiatives at NJIT, the IBNR will serve as an umbrella and organizing framework for collaborative research and training in areas ranging from brain injury, to neural engineering, to neurobiology, to computational neuroscience. Researchers will investigate, for example, how specific behaviors are generated in the nervous system, the mathematical modeling of neural patterns in bacteria, animals and humans, and innovations in brain imaging and neurorehabilitation, among others. In opening remarks at the IBNR inauguration ceremony held in the Campus Center, NJIT President Joel Bloom offered a succinct summary of the new institute's working environment: "Very talented people working in teams across disciplines to solve very challenging problems." This perspective was similarly reiterated by NJIT Provost Fadi Deek, Professor of Biomedical Engineering Namas Chandra and Professor of Neurobiology Farzan Nadim. Chandra and Nadim, both distinguished researchers, are co-directors of the IBNR. As Chandra and Nadim emphasized, the IBNR will not only promote leading-edge integrative research but will also engage students at every level in this research. Chandra said, "We are beginning to unravel some of the greatest mysteries of the brain. But this can only happen if knowledgeable people in many disciplines come together and speak the same language - the language of neuroscience. NJIT is providing the structure critical for making this happen." Nadim added, "The IBNR puts us in the position of having a truly interdisciplinary program in the neurosciences at NJIT. Involving undergraduate and graduate students in the work of the institute will clearly reinforce how interdisciplinary collaboration is fundamental to meeting the challenges we propose to approach, which include acquiring more comprehensive knowledge of the normal brain so that we can understand what's wrong with respect to diseases and disorders." Provost Deek said that the IBNR sets a high bar for research and education at the university, not only in terms of successful scientific investigation but also to the extent that it succeeds in valuing participation by junior as well as senior faculty, and by an increasing presence of women and minorities historically underrepresented in such leading-edge initiatives. Referencing the university's current strategic plan, 2020 Vision, Deek said that the IBNR is "how the university will look in 2020." "Establishing the IBNR is a milestone of superb collaborative synergy among faculty, staff and students," said Atam Dhawan, NJIT's vice provost for research, in his welcoming remarks. At NJIT, as Dhawan explained, this synergy integrates numerous related efforts across disciplines and research centers. It will also make the IBNR a focal point for collaboration with a wide range of other institutions and funding organizations. Cooperation in working toward common goals in brain and neuroscience research already involves Rutgers University-Newark, Rutgers Biomedical Health System, part of Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, the Brain Health Institute at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, and the Kessler Foundation. The National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the Kessler Foundation are among the organizations providing funding for research currently underway. The audience of some 200 gathered for the formal inauguration of the IBNR, which included brief presentations of research by faculty and students and a tour of campus research facilities, reflected the inclusive outreach of the IBNR initiative. Commenting on the perspective of his own institution, Sussex County Community College President Jon Connolly said that a key goal at his school is to provide students who want to eventually attend NJIT with the physical resources and solid grounding in the STEM disciplines relevant to successful participation in research such as that going forward at the IBNR. The keynote address at the inauguration was given by Colonel Sidney R. Hinds II, M.D., U.S. Army. Currently, he is the coordinator for the Brain Health Research Program for the Department of Defense (DoD) Blast Injury Research Program Coordinating Office and medical advisor to the principal assistant for research and technology, Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, Maryland. He has also served as the national director for the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center. While a critical DoD research priority is traumatic brain injury (TBI) related to the combat experience of U.S. military personnel, Hinds said that the scope of this effort is also far more inclusive. Citing the incidence of brain injuries in the national population -- some 1.7 million reported annually with 52,000 deaths -- he said that DoD programs and collaborations in this area promise to benefit not only those serving in all branches of our military but also the general U.S. population and the people of other countries. Accordingly, the DoD is working with a wide range of academic institutions and research organizations to investigate the "full continuum of brain trauma and how that trauma occurs." "We do have state-of-the-art science and critical care but we need to standardize our approach and better utilize what we know. We want to go from good to great," Hinds said. Going from "good to great," he explained will require comprehensive investigation of what he termed the "neurotoxic cascade" of brain injuries -- the nuanced, complex impacts on the anatomy of the brain and our neurophysiology. This includes gaining a more comprehensive understanding of the unique challenges presented by mild, or concussive, TBI, which are the majority of such injuries. Collaboration will be the key to progress in acquiring new basic knowledge and improving care for the injured, Hinds said. "It is not going to be one organization, not one individual, not one lab but a very multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary approach that will move the field forward toward better understanding of the brain, especially with respect to brain injury." Commenting specifically on the establishment of the IBNR, Hinds spoke of how it will build on research that NJIT is already doing in collaboration with the DoD and other groups. He characterized the IBNR as a place where "geographically disparate, perhaps mission-disparate, organizations can be brought together to best utilize available resources to answer critical questions about traumatic brain injury and neuroscience." Under the leadership of Directors Chandra and Nadim, Hinds said, the IBNR will be a place where "shared experiences, shared resources and shared research" can be strategically focused on identifying critical gaps in our knowledge and then prioritizing and initiating efforts that can fill those gaps. One of the nation's leading public technological universities, New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) is a top-tier research university that prepares students to become leaders in the technology-dependent economy of the 21st century. NJIT's multidisciplinary curriculum and computing-intensive approach to education provide technological proficiency, business acumen and leadership skills. With an enrollment of 11,400 graduate and undergraduate students, NJIT offers small-campus intimacy with the resources of a major public research university. NJIT is a global leader in such fields as solar research, nanotechnology, resilient design, tissue engineering, and cybersecurity, in addition to others. NJIT is among the top U.S. polytechnic public universities in research expenditures, exceeding $130 million, and is among the top 1 percent of public colleges and universities in return on educational investment, according to PayScale.com. NJIT has a $1.74 billion annual economic impact on the State of New Jersey.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

mem property management was recently selected as the new property management company for the Timberline at Edison Homeowners Association in Edison, New Jersey. Timberline at Edison is an attractive condominium and townhome community in Middlesex County favored by residents for its many desirable amenities and active community. “We are privileged to be chosen as the management company for the Timberline at Edison Homeowners Association and look forward to working with a highly engaged HOA board and supporting a terrific residential community,” says Martin Laderman, founder and CEO of mem property management. Timberline at Edison offers sought after recreational facilities, including a swimming pool, clubhouse, playground and tennis courts. Timberline at Edison residents appreciate an easy commute to New York City or Philadelphia, convenient highway access and excellent public transportation options, including Amtrak and New Jersey Transit. Edison, New Jersey, was recently voted one of America’s Best Places to Live according to Money Magazine. This 32-square-mile township of more than 100,000 residents, has a rich history, from colonial times to the present, and is the home of Thomas Alva Edison’s famed Menlo Park laboratory where the incandescent light bulb was perfected and sound was first recorded. Rutgers University and Middlesex Community College are located nearby and the area has attracted major employers, such as John F. Kennedy Medical Center and Johnson & Johnson. “Timberline at Edison residents appreciate the high achieving public schools, central location, vibrant business environment and diversity, that combine to make this community a great place to live, work and raise a family,” said Laderman. mem property management is a privately held New Jersey property management company founded by Martin H. Laderman, with the vision to increase property value through solid, experienced management. Since that time, the company has expanded to manage dozens of properties from its New York border to the Jersey Shore and Gold Coast. mem property management is privileged to serve some of the finest communities throughout New Jersey including many of the major developers and builders as well as communities as diverse as small ocean-front condominiums to large master-planned communities with several hundred homes to age-restricted retirement communities. To learn more about mem property management corporation, its services or its policies, please visit http://www.memproperty.com/ or call (201) 798­1080.


"Rutgers iJOBS is excited to have biomedical graduate students and postdoctoral fellows completing the Board Certification in Medical Affairs Specialist program.  iJOBS is funded by the NIH Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training (BEST) initiative with the goal of exposing PhD students and postdocs to careers outside of academia so they can make informed decisions about their futures.  Many of our iJOBS trainees have expressed interest in a career in Medical Affairs within the pharmaceutical industry and the BCMAS program is a systematic mechanism for training scientific and clinical professionals in the topics related to this field.  By providing them exposure to areas they will be focused once they land a role, the BCMAS program helps them hit the ground running more effectively providing them with a competitive advantage,"said Dr. Janet Alder, Assistant Dean for Graduate Academic and Student Affairs, Rutgers University - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School "We are excited to be working with Rutgers being able to provide students and postdocs with exposure to alternative career options in the pharmaceutical industry," said Dr. William A. Soliman, chair and founder of the ACMA.  "Many MD, PharmD, and PhD students and post-docs are not aware of roles such as the medical science liaison, medical information, or medical director, where the training and skills they have acquired can open new career possibilities within the pharmaceutical industry." The BCMAS program is a self paced, online program providing the most comprehensive training within medical affairs. To be eligible for the program, candidates must hold a PhD, MD, PharmD, or DO or must be currently enrolled in an accredited doctoral program which grants these degrees. A passing score on the board examination is necessary to become board certified. The Accreditation Council for Medical Affairs (ACMA) is a self-governing entity whose mission is to establish, certify, and maintain the competencies of qualified medical and scientific professionals who have a focus in Medical Affairs within the pharmaceutical & biotechnology industries. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-board-certified-medical-affairs-specialist-program-bcmas-comes-to-rutgers-university-providing-a-new-path-forward-for-scientific-and-clinical-professionals-looking-to-work-within-the-pharmaceutical-industry-300447181.html


The Advisory Council is led by Swamy Kotagiri, Magna Chief Technology Officer (CTO), and consists of some of the most recognized and respected experts in the global automotive and tech industries. The council brings a wider circle of insight, knowledge and experience from various industries that ultimately helps accelerate the execution of Magna's technology and business objectives. "The pace of innovation in the automotive industry is like nothing we have ever seen before, creating even more challenges and opportunities," said Kotagiri.  "At Magna, we welcome the challenge and aim to seize the opportunities by continuing to leverage our culture of innovation, while embracing a new level of innovation outreach.  We are excited to have such a distinguished group of individuals bringing their vision and insights to our company." Advisory Council members will provide high-level strategic planning insights and experience in the areas of advanced driver assistance systems, environmental and automotive safety, overall industry trends, and next-generation technologies. Chaired by Kotagiri, the Advisory Council is comprised of six members who are recognized leaders in their respective fields, several of whom have significant experience in product innovation and the implementation of new technologies. "Magna's deep vehicle systems knowledge and electronics capabilities, combined with its global engineering and manufacturing expertise, are remarkable," said Tony Fadell. "They are in a great position to help drive change in the auto industry and I am excited to be working with such an innovative company." "Magna is a company committed to helping define the future of mobility and I am delighted to be a part of such a distinguished group of individuals who collectively can bring new opportunities to Magna and the industry," said Dr. Ian Hunter. Swamy Kotagiri is globally responsible for managing Magna's innovation and new product strategy and development.  As CTO, Kotagiri helps Magna's product groups bring innovative ideas to the market, which allows the company to move the automotive industry forward. Mei-Wei Cheng is a member of the Board of Directors of Seagate Technology PLC and recently served as non-executive Chairman of Pactera.  He was the former CEO and President for the Chinese subsidiaries of AT&T, Siemens Ford Motor Company and General Electric. He holds a bachelor's degree in industrial engineering/operations research from Cornell University and an MBA from Rutgers University. Tony Fadell is the inventor of the iPod, an inventor of the iPhone, and founder of Nest, the company that pioneered the "Internet of things".  He is an active investor and entrepreneur with a 25-year history of founding companies and designing products that improve people's lives. Fadell has authored more than 300 patents.  In May 2016, TIME named Nest Thermostat, the iPod and iPhone as three of the "50 Most Influential Gadgets of All Time." Dr. Ian Hunter is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering and runs the BioInstrumentation Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  Dr. Hunter has filed over 150 patents, produced more than 500 scientific and engineering publications, and has founded and/or co-founded 25 companies. He received his bachelor's, master's and doctorate degrees from the University of Auckland and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the department of Biomedical Engineering at McGill University in Canada. John Maddox is the CEO of the American Center for Mobility. He began his career as a Research Engineer at Ford Motor Company and has held positions such as Associate Administrator at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and Compliance Officer at Volkswagen North America. He holds a degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Maryland and a master's degree in engineering management from the University of Detroit Mercy. Paul Mascarenas is a member of the Board of Directors at ON Semiconductor and the United States Steel Corporation.  He previously held a number of senior leadership positions at Ford Motor Company, most recently serving as Chief Technical Officer.  Paul holds a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the University of London, King's College in England and holds an honorary doctorate degree from Chongqing University in China. ABOUT MAGNA We are a leading global automotive supplier with 317 manufacturing operations and 102 product development, engineering and sales centres in 29 countries. We have over 155,000 employees focused on delivering superior value to our customers through innovative products and processes, and world class manufacturing. We have complete vehicle engineering and contract manufacturing expertise, as well as product capabilities which include body, chassis, exterior, seating, powertrain, active driver assistance, vision, closure and roof systems. We also have electronic and software capabilities across many of these areas.  Our common shares trade on the Toronto Stock Exchange (MG) and the New York Stock Exchange (MGA). For further information about Magna, visit our website at www.magna.com. THIS RELEASE MAY CONTAIN STATEMENTS WHICH CONSTITUTE "FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS" UNDER APPLICABLE SECURITIES LEGISLATION AND ARE SUBJECT TO, AND EXPRESSLY QUALIFIED BY, THE CAUTIONARY DISCLAIMERS THAT ARE SET OUT IN MAGNA'S REGULATORY FILINGS. PLEASE REFER TO MAGNA'S MOST CURRENT MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF RESULTS OF OPERATIONS AND FINANCIAL POSITION, ANNUAL INFORMATION FORM AND ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 40-F, AS REPLACED OR UPDATED BY ANY OF MAGNA'S SUBSEQUENT REGULATORY FILINGS, WHICH SET OUT THE CAUTIONARY DISCLAIMERS, INCLUDING THE RISK FACTORS THAT COULD CAUSE ACTUAL EVENTS TO DIFFER MATERIALLY FROM THOSE INDICATED BY SUCH FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS. THESE DOCUMENTS ARE AVAILABLE FOR REVIEW ON MAGNA'S WEBSITE AT WWW.MAGNA.COM.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

BEVERLY HILLS, CA--(Marketwired - Apr 10, 2017) - Rich Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ( : RCHA) ("Rich" or the "Company"), a biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing innovative therapies in oncology, announced today Carole A. Salvador, Psy.D has been appointed to the Company's Board of Directors. "We are thrilled that Dr. Salvador is joining our Board. We believe her extensive experience in psychopharmacology will be an asset as we are planning on extending our trials and broadening our pipeline," said Mr. Chang. "I am looking forward to bringing my years of experience in developing businesses to bear here at Rich Pharmaceuticals. Ben has done a great job nurturing our technologies and I look forward to making a significant contribution as we move into clinical trials," stated Dr. Salvador. Dr. Salvador brings to Rich Pharmaceuticals management, business and scientific research experience and psychopharmacology expertise. Dr. Salvador created and manages a Clinical, Coaching and Organizational Consulting practice, Affiliates in Psychology and Education, for over 30 years. During this period she was also a principal in the organizational consulting firm of Cogent Resources. Dr. Salvador has consulted to small and medium sized businesses in the for-profit and non-profit sectors. Most recently her business consulting has focused on family owned and managed companies. Prior to her career in Applied Psychology, she worked in Biochemistry research at Cornell Medical School and Pharmacology research at Burroughs Wellcome which is now part of GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). She has expertise and holds a certificate in psychopharmacology. Dr. Salvador received her Doctor of Psychology from Rutgers University in Applied Psychology and a B.S. in the Biological Sciences from New York University. In addition to her certification in Psychopharmacology, she completed a post-doctoral fellowship in Community Systems and a post-doctoral program in Organizational Development and Consultation at the William Alanson White Institute. Forward-Looking Statements: This news release contains "forward-looking statements" as that term is defined in Section 27(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Statements in this press release that are not purely historical are forward-looking statements and include any statements regarding beliefs, plans, expectations or intentions regarding the future. Such forward-looking statements include, among other things, references to novel technologies and methods, our business and product development plans, and our ability to obtain financing from GHS Investments. Actual results could differ from those projected in any forward-looking statements due to numerous factors. Such factors include, among others, the inherent uncertainties associated with developing new products or technologies and operating as a development stage company, our ability to raise the additional funding we will need to commence clinical trials and to continue to pursue our business and product development plans, our ability to develop and commercialize products based on our technology platform, competition in the industry in which we operate and market conditions. These forward-looking statements are made as of the date of this news release, and we assume no obligation to update the forward-looking statements, or to update the reasons why actual results could differ from those projected in the forward-looking statements. Although we believe that any beliefs, plans, expectations and intentions contained in this press release are reasonable, there can be no assurance that any such beliefs, plans, expectations or intentions will prove to be accurate. Investors should consult all of the information set forth herein and should also refer to the risk factors disclosure outlined in the reports and other documents we file with the SEC, available at www.sec.gov. This is not a solicitation to buy or sell securities and does not purport to be an analysis of the Company's financial position.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

An adjunct professor at the Tampa satellite location of Cooley Law School, Victoria Cruz-Garcia was one of two coaches for the students participating in this year’s competition, which hosted law students from around the country for 3 days in April. The competition focused on emerging issues at the intersection of gaming law and regulation and allowed the students to hone their appellate advocacy skills before prominent jurists and gaming practitioners in the gaming capital of the world. “The opportunity to guide my students through the litigation of a realistic trial was inspiring,” said Cruz-Garcia, a family law attorney at Givens Givens Sparks. “The students worked really hard to apply their knowledge and training and compete with their peers in a setting that was as close to a real-life courtroom as they have witnessed at this point in their pre-professional lives.” Cruz-Garcia represents clients in all facets of family law matters including divorce, child custody, alimony and support actions, as well as enforcement matters. A Stetson College of Law graduate and Rutgers University undergrad, she was the recipient of the ‘2015 Luis Cabassa Award’ by the THBA, was named to the Rising Stars℠ list by "Super Lawyers®" in 2012, 2013 and 2014, and was awarded the Tampa Hispanic Heritage Trailblazer Award in Education in 2014, and the WMU Cooley Law School ‘Great Deeds’ award in 2013. Cruz-Garcia is currently an adjunct professor at WMU Cooley Law School where she teaches courses on ‘Family Violence and Florida Juvenile Dependency and Delinquency.’ She is also the co-chair of the Awards Committee for the Hillsborough Association for Women Lawyers and was appointed to the Florida Bar Association Diversity & Inclusion Committee as well as the Judicial Nominating Procedures Committee. Givens Givens Sparks is a trial law firm representing individuals and their families in state and federal cases ranging from complex high net-worth divorce cases and personal injury/wrongful death actions, to commercial insurance litigation. With more than 135 years of combined professional experience, the Givens Givens Sparks team of lawyers is dedicated to the advocacy and protection of their clients and their families. To learn more about Givens Givens Sparks, please visit: http://www.givenssparks.com. Click on links for access to photos. Photo #1: Professors Victoria Cruz-Garcia and Barbara Kalinowski with their moot court law student team of (Thomas Yi, Jennifer Diaz, Cynthia Pritchett, Jill Albury and Timothy Siatta). Photo #2: Victoria Cruz-Garcia (right) with her moot court law student team (Thomas Yi, Jennifer Diaz and Jill Albury).


Elaine G. Adevai Commemorated with a Lifetime Achievement Award by Strathmore's Who's Who Worldwide Publication About Elaine G. Adevai Ms. Adevai is the Executive Director and Founder of New Vista for Families, Inc., which is a national nonprofit providing services that assist families in need. She has been with this organization for the past 8 years. She is responsible for running an emergency shelter for domestic violence victims. Ms. Adevai hires and trains the staff, runs the support group and provides individual counseling for clients. She supervises the staff and offers counseling and therapeutic services. She also handles community outreach to raise donations and helps the women and children referred to them to get back on their feet and find permanent housing. Concurrently, Ms. Adevai is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and has had a part-time private practice as a Psychotherapist since 1975. She began her career as a Staff Psychotherapist and Instructor at Rutgers Community Mental Health Center from 1971 to 1973. She was a Team Leader at Kingsboro Psychiatric Center from 1973 to 1975. Ms. Adevai owned and managed two restaurants/cabarets from 1982 to 1994. She served as a Counselor and Social Worker for Victim Services Family Court Unit from 1998 to 2000. She was the Director of the Domestic Violence Shelter Program for Safe Horizon from 2000 to 2007 and became Executive Director of the Domestic Violence Shelter Program at New Vista for Families, Inc. in 2009. After obtaining a B.S. in Pre-Medical Studies from Douglass College in 1967, Ms. Adevai obtained a M.S. in Clinical Psychology from Rutgers University in 1970. She then completed an internship at Merril Palmer. Ms. Adevai received the Distinction Award from the Staten Island Chapter of the World of Women. She is affiliated with the New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence, the Human Resources Administration and the New York State Office of Children and Family Services. In 1965, Ms. Adevai married Joseph (deceased) and they have four children. In her spare time she enjoys family activities, cooking, embroidery and reading. She looks forward to expanding her psychoeducational and counseling services and expanding the shelter. Opening the shelter has been the highlight of her career thus far. If you are interested in learning more about New Vista for Families, Inc., please call (718) 984-6842. They are actively in need of funding and charitable donations. Philanthropic donations are welcome as well. About Strathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide Strathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide is an international advertising, networking and publishing company based in Farmingdale, New York. They are proud to be able to satisfy their clients and continue to have repeat clientele due to their longevity and pride in their products and services. The Owners strive to connect business professionals to enhance their contact base and networking capabilities so they can get the acknowledgment and publicity within their industries and beyond. The Strathmore family has been providing these valuable services for over two decades. They target executives and professionals in all industries to be featured in their publication and on-line directory. Industries include business, law, education, healthcare and medicine, fine arts, IT, government, science, real estate, entertainment and many more accomplished fields. Professional profiles are listed in an annual hardcover journal and in a detailed, searchable database on the website www.strww.com. Staten Island, NY, May 02, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Elaine G. Adevai of Staten Island, New York has been commemorated with a Lifetime Achievement Award by Strathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide for her outstanding contributions and high level of success for over 35 years in the field of nonprofit services.About Elaine G. AdevaiMs. Adevai is the Executive Director and Founder of New Vista for Families, Inc., which is a national nonprofit providing services that assist families in need. She has been with this organization for the past 8 years. She is responsible for running an emergency shelter for domestic violence victims. Ms. Adevai hires and trains the staff, runs the support group and provides individual counseling for clients. She supervises the staff and offers counseling and therapeutic services. She also handles community outreach to raise donations and helps the women and children referred to them to get back on their feet and find permanent housing.Concurrently, Ms. Adevai is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and has had a part-time private practice as a Psychotherapist since 1975. She began her career as a Staff Psychotherapist and Instructor at Rutgers Community Mental Health Center from 1971 to 1973. She was a Team Leader at Kingsboro Psychiatric Center from 1973 to 1975. Ms. Adevai owned and managed two restaurants/cabarets from 1982 to 1994. She served as a Counselor and Social Worker for Victim Services Family Court Unit from 1998 to 2000. She was the Director of the Domestic Violence Shelter Program for Safe Horizon from 2000 to 2007 and became Executive Director of the Domestic Violence Shelter Program at New Vista for Families, Inc. in 2009.After obtaining a B.S. in Pre-Medical Studies from Douglass College in 1967, Ms. Adevai obtained a M.S. in Clinical Psychology from Rutgers University in 1970. She then completed an internship at Merril Palmer. Ms. Adevai received the Distinction Award from the Staten Island Chapter of the World of Women. She is affiliated with the New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence, the Human Resources Administration and the New York State Office of Children and Family Services.In 1965, Ms. Adevai married Joseph (deceased) and they have four children. In her spare time she enjoys family activities, cooking, embroidery and reading. She looks forward to expanding her psychoeducational and counseling services and expanding the shelter. Opening the shelter has been the highlight of her career thus far.If you are interested in learning more about New Vista for Families, Inc., please call (718) 984-6842. They are actively in need of funding and charitable donations. Philanthropic donations are welcome as well.About Strathmore’s Who’s Who WorldwideStrathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide is an international advertising, networking and publishing company based in Farmingdale, New York. They are proud to be able to satisfy their clients and continue to have repeat clientele due to their longevity and pride in their products and services. The Owners strive to connect business professionals to enhance their contact base and networking capabilities so they can get the acknowledgment and publicity within their industries and beyond. The Strathmore family has been providing these valuable services for over two decades. They target executives and professionals in all industries to be featured in their publication and on-line directory. Industries include business, law, education, healthcare and medicine, fine arts, IT, government, science, real estate, entertainment and many more accomplished fields. Professional profiles are listed in an annual hardcover journal and in a detailed, searchable database on the website www.strww.com. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Strathmore Worldwide


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Victor A. Rotolo, founder of The Rotolo Law Firm of Lebanon, NJ, has been named to the 2017 New Jersey Super Lawyers list. This marks the 12th consecutive year Mr. Rotolo has been included on this list, having first been selected in 2006. Charles C. Rifici, a three-year associate with the Firm, has been named to Super Lawyers’ list of New Jersey Rising Stars for 2017. Additionally, Rosalyn A. Metzger, Of Counsel to the Firm, has been named to the 2017 New Jersey Super Lawyers list and to the 2017 Pennslvania Super Lawyers list. Both the Super Lawyers and the Rising Stars lists are generated by Thomson Reuters, which employs the methodology and set of standards set forth under the Super Lawyers Selection Methodology. “Charles and Rosalyn have been valuable additions to my Firm," stated Mr. Rotolo. “They are wholeheartedly committed to protecting the legal rights of our clients as the Firm's top priority," Rotolo continued. Mr. Rotolo founded The Rotolo Law Firm in 1992. Since then he has focused his practice on personal injury, divorce and family law, and criminal defense. Prior to beginning his career as an attorney, Mr. Rotolo served for two years as an officer on the Elizabeth, NJ police force. Mr. Rifici has been an associate with the Firm since 2014. He focuses on family law matters, including estate planning and probate issues, civil litigation, and criminal defense. A 2009 graduate of Rutgers University – New Brunswick, Mr. Rifici received his law degree from Rutgers University School of Law – Camden in 2013. Prior to joining The Rotolo Law Firm, Mr. Rifici completed a family law clerkship with the Honorable Anthony F. Picheca, Jr., J.S.C., in Somerset County, NJ. Mr. Rifici is admitted to practice in New Jersey and Pennsylvania and is a member of both the Hunterdon County and New Jersey Bar Associations. This year is the first in which Mr. Rifici was named to the New Jersey Rising Stars list. Ms. Metzger, Attorney Of Counsel at The Rotolo Law Firm, focuses on the processes of family law mediation, parenting coordination and collaborative divorce. A 1994 graduate of Seton Hall University School of Law, Ms. Metzger became a solo practitioner in 1997, concentrating on matrimonial law. Ms. Metzger then became a collaborative law practitioner in 2009, the same year in which she received the Professional Lawyer of the Year award from the Hunterdon County Bar Association. She was later selected as the Association’s nominee for the 2014 James B. Boskey ADR Practitioner of the Year award. This is the third year Ms. Metzger has been named to the New Jersey Super Lawyers list, having also been selected in 2015 and 2016, and 2017 is the first year Ms. Metzger has been named to the Pennsylvania Super Lawyers list. In addition to being named to the New Jersey Super Lawyers list, Mr. Rotolo is a member of the Million Dollar Advocates Forum since 2002 and of the Multi-Million Dollar Advocates Forum since 2016. Membership in these forums is restricted to attorneys who have won verdicts or reached settlements in the amount of one million dollars and above. Mr. Rotolo maintains an “AV” rating from Martindale-Hubbell, having first achieved that rating in 1996. Martindale-Hubbell, the oldest nationally recognized legal reference company in the U.S., uses the methodology and set of standards set forth in Martindale-Hubbell Peer Review Ratings Methodology, to determine these ratings. Mr. Rotolo is certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Civil Trial Attorney having met the criteria for certification set forth under Rule 1:39: Specialty Certification of Attorneys. He was appointed by the New Jersey Supreme Court to serve on the Supreme Court of New Jersey District XIII Ethics Committee for the years 2009 through 2011, during which time he served as both Chair and Vice Chair of the Committee. Admitted to practice in all New Jersey Courts, as well as the U.S. District Courts, the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, and the U.S. Tax Court, Mr. Rotolo holds membership in both the Hunterdon County and Somerset County Bar Associations. For more information on Victor Rotolo and his legal team at The Rotolo Law Firm, visit the Firm’s website at http://www.rotololawfirm.com. [No aspect of this advertisement has been approved by the New Jersey Supreme Court.]


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Denville law firm Einhorn Harris today announces that Partners Gary R. Botwinick and Matheu D. Nunn have been named to the 2017 National Law Journal’s Divorce, Trusts & Estates Trailblazers List, a special supplement developed by the business arm of The National Law Journal. The second annual honor recognizes the accomplishments of leading practitioners in the fields of Divorce, Trusts & Estates. Botwinick and Nunn were selected from a competitive field of nominees, all of whom have “changed the practice in their respective fields through innovative and exceptional legal strategies.” The supplement, which includes individualized profiles of all the honorees, is available in The National Law Journal’s May 2017 edition and online at http://www.nlj.com. “We are proud of this prestigious recognition. It is extremely gratifying to see our attorneys recognized for the excellent work they do for their clients,” says Managing Partner Patricia M. Barbarito. Gary Botwinick focuses his practice on taxation, trust and estate planning, estate administration, estate litigation, guardianships, special needs law, and business law. He is chair of the firm’s Taxation/Trusts & Estates Department. Botwinick’s career began in the IRS Manhattan District Counsel Office, where he tried civil cases before the U.S. Tax Court. He is a Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel and the former President of the Estate Planning Council of Northern New Jersey. Botwinick serves as a Trustee of the Jewish Community Foundation of Greater MetroWest New Jersey, and as a member of the Board of the Grotta Fund for Senior Care. Additionally, he was appointed by Governor Chris Christie as a member of the New Jersey Israel Commission. Botwinick is a frequent lecturer for the New Jersey Institute of Continuing Legal Education, as well as many other professional organizations including the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel (ACTEC), the Estate Planning Council of Northern New Jersey, the Estate Planning Council of New York City, and the Greater New Jersey Estate Planning Council. He has published articles in the New Jersey Law Journal and other publications on various estate planning subjects. Botwinick focuses his lecturing and writing on the interplay between the areas of estate planning and matrimonial law. He has published articles on the use of discretionary trusts for divorce protection, the unintended consequences of irrevocable life insurance trusts (ILITs) and qualified personal residence trusts (QPRTs) when clients divorce, and estate planning issues for same-sex couples. He has also lectured extensively on the effective use of prenuptial agreements, planning for a special needs child during a divorce, and estate planning for second marriages. Matheu Nunn co-chairs the firm’s Appellate Practice Group and handles matrimonial litigation. Prior to joining the firm, he attended Rutgers School of Law (Camden), where he was an editor of the Rutgers University Law Review and graduated with honors. Following law school, Nunn clerked for the Hon. B. Theodore Bozonelis, A.J.S.C. (ret.) (2007-2008), and the Hon. Jack M. Sabatino, P.J.A.D. (2008-2009). He then worked for the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office in the Major Crimes and Appellate section. Within months of joining Einhorn Harris, Nunn was appointed to serve as Prosecutor of Morris Township, New Jersey, in 2012, a position he left when he became an elected official in Morris Township in 2016. Since becoming a member of the bar in 2007, Nunn has handled more than 35 Appellate Division/Supreme Court cases, including six published cases. He has tried both jury and non-jury trials, and has moderated several Appellate/Supreme Court Practice seminars. Nunn was recently selected by the New Jersey Law Journal as one of three finalists for the prestigious “Attorney of the Year Award.” The New Jersey Law Journal also recognized Nunn as a “New Leader of the Bar” in 2015. Nunn has also received an AV Preeminent Rating from Martindale-Hubbell (the highest possible rating), and has been selected as a Super Lawyer Rising Star across three different practice areas: Family Law, Appellate Practice, and Criminal Law. Nunn also volunteers as a trustee for the Morris County Bar Association, a member of the New Jersey State Bar Appellate Practice Committee, and as an Early Settlement Panelist in Morris County. The 2017 Trailblazer honor recognizes the notable achievements of outstanding attorneys across eight categories, including Divorce, Trusts & Estates, Energy & Environmental, Intellectual Property, Plaintiffs’ Attorneys, Elite Boutiques, M&A and Antitrust, Cyber Security, and Litigation. ABOUT EINHORN HARRIS Established in 1961, Einhorn Harris, based in Denville, New Jersey, is a comprehensive, full-service law firm devoted to serving a broad range of legal needs. In its more than 50 years in business, Einhorn Harris and its attorneys have earned a reputation for dedication to the community. The firm specializes in many areas of practice including family, criminal and tax law; accidents/personal Injury; and commercial litigation. http://www.einhornharris.com.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

This initiative follows the educational collaboration agreement with Rutgers University, U.S. Navy and U.S. Army in advancing the standard of care for treating periodontitis and peri-implantitis through the LANAP and LAPIP protocols. True Periodontal Regeneration™ through the LANAP Protocol is evidence-based and scientifically validated with FDA clearance using the PerioLase® MVP-7™ dental laser and advanced ultrasonics to regenerate bone and tissues lost to gum disease.  The protocol is taught by Certified Instructors at the Institute for Advanced Laser Dentistry (IALD) via live-patient, clinical, hands on courses. "A key factor for the consistent, positive results of the LANAP protocol is the standardized, live-patient training continuum," remarks Dawn M. Gregg, DDS, CEO & Training Director for the IALD.   "The training is unique in dentistry, as is our Instructor Candidacy program.  The process to become a certified IALD Instructor requires standardization of presentation skills and clinical calibration to ensure the next generation of LANAP clinicians trained by these newly Certified Instructors will also achieve the same consistent, positive results." Andre Paes, DDS, MSc, PhD, Assistant Professor of Periodontics, and Justin Zalewsky, DDS, will become certified to teach the LANAP protocol.  Dr. Paes will first learn to perform the LANAP protocol under the same strict tutelage as other doctors.  Dr. Zalewsky obtained his LANAP certification in 2015 and entered the Instructor Candidacy program earlier this year. The integration is funded in part by the vision and commitment of alumnus Oreste "Russ" Zanni, DDS.  Dr. Zanni left a specific endowment to the periodontics department to continue to advance periodontal research and teaching. "The LANAP protocol has had an astonishing impact for the patients in my practice," states Dr Zaleswky.  "I was surprised at the thoroughness and emphasis on laser physics during my initial training.  I was even more amazed seeing the results first-hand in my own patients and their overwhelmingly positive reactions to LANAP surgery." "The adoption of the LANAP protocol into additional world-class universities showcases the urgent need for increased education about gum disease treatment options," states Robert H. Gregg II, DDS, Millennium Dental Technologies' co-founder and LANAP® protocol inventor. "LANAP treatment was developed by putting the patient's needs first. Too many patients simply refuse periodontal treatment. LANAP surgery gives them a minimally invasive option that is scientifically validated and is both hope for the hopeless tooth and the hopeless patient." ABOUT CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE: The mission of the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine is to provide outstanding programs in oral health education, patient care, focused research and scholarship, and service that are of value to our constituents. We accomplish this in an environment that fosters collegiality and professionalism and that enables a diverse group of students to become competent oral health care providers and contribute to the health and well-being of individuals and communities. ABOUT MILLENNIUM DENTAL TECHNOLOGIES, INC.:  Millennium Dental Technologies, Inc., is the developer of the LANAP protocol for the treatment of gum disease and the manufacturer of the PerioLase MVP-7 digital dental laser. MDT's FDA-cleared LANAP protocol removes the fear from gum disease treatment, offering a vastly less painful and less invasive regenerative treatment alternative to conventional surgery. The company's founding clinician, Robert H. Gregg, II, continues to operate the company with the vision: To create better clinical outcomes in periodontal disease patients—and to remain true to the guiding principle—"It's all about the patient." ABOUT THE INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED LASER DENTISTRY: The IALD is a non-profit educational and research center dedicated to providing evidence-based clinical training in advanced laser dentistry therapies. Formed in 1999, the IALD is ADA-CERP and AGD-PACE accredited, and is nationally recognized for its continuing education programs. The IALD's ultimate goal is for the percentage of patients seeking treatment for periodontitis to reach the percentage of patients seeking general dental care. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/case-western-dental-school-adds-regenerative-lanap-protocol-300442864.html


Starting with a missing atom, referred to as a vacancy (top left), and applying an electric charge that attracts electrons to the region, the electrons are confined into “orbitals” to create an “artificial atom” (lower right). The images are electron concentration maps obtained with scanning tunneling spectroscopy that visualize the vacancy, and then the electron orbitals (in red) of an artificial atom created in graphene. R1, R1’ and R2 show the orbitals in order of increasing energy. Credit: Eva Andrei, Rutgers University For the first time, scientists created a tunable artificial atom in graphene. They demonstrated that a vacancy in graphene can be charged in a controllable way such that electrons can be localized to mimic the electron orbitals of an artificial atom. Importantly, the trapping mechanism is reversible (turned on and off) and the energy levels can be tuned. The results from this research demonstrate a viable, controllable, and reversible technique to confine electrons in graphene. The energy states of the electrons are "tunable." This tunability opens new avenues of research into the unique physics electron behavior in graphene. Further, it provides a methodology that could facilitate the use of graphene-based devices for future electronics, communications, and sensors. Graphene's remarkable electronic properties have fueled the vision of developing graphene-based devices to enable lighter, faster and smarter electronics and advanced computing applications. But progress towards this goal has been slowed by the inability to confine its charge carriers with applied voltage. A team led by researchers from Rutgers University developed a technique to stably host and controllably modify localized charge states in graphene. The researchers created vacancies (missing carbon atoms) in the graphene lattice, by bombarding the sample with charged helium atoms (He+ ions). They demonstrated that it is possible to deposit a positive charge at the vacancy site and to charge it gradually by applying voltage pulses with a scanning tunneling microscope tip. As the charge on the vacancy increases, its interaction with the conduction electrons in graphene undergoes a transition. The interaction turns into a regime where the electrons can be trapped into quasi-bound energy states that resemble an artificial atom. The team further showed that the quasi-bound states at the vacancy site are tunable with application of an external electric field. The trapping mechanism can be turned on and off, providing a new paradigm to control and guide electrons in graphene. Explore further: Built from the bottom up, nanoribbons pave the way to 'on-off' states for graphene More information: Jinhai Mao et al. Realization of a tunable artificial atom at a supercritically charged vacancy in graphene, Nature Physics (2016). DOI: 10.1038/nphys3665


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Researchers identified one damaged, or mutant, “high confidence” risk gene for Tourette syndrome as well as three others they believe are genes whose mutation is a probable risk for the disorder. These findings, published in Neuron, are important because the genetics of Tourette syndrome has been a mystery. The goal of the continuing study is to identify inherited factors that play a role in causing Tourette’s and other related disorders, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). “This research is the first of its kind establishing Tourette disorder as a genetic disease similar to other neuropsychiatric disorders like autism, where not just one gene has been identified as the cause,” says Jay Tischfield, a professor of genetics at Rutgers University and a senior author of the study. “We are confident that this new information will lead us to the genetic and brain pathways that cause this disorder and enable the development of more effective treatments.” The Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study is the largest and most comprehensive genomic analysis conducted. The research began a decade ago when Rutgers started collaborating with New Jersey Center for Tourette Syndrome and Associated Disorders, Inc. to establish the NJCTS Cell and DNA Repository. The study included 311 families involved with TIC Genetics in which the child had Tourette syndrome but neither parent did. Another study was done through the Tourette Association of America International Consortium for Genetics with 173 similar families and found the same results. The one damaged gene that was identified as having a high risk for Tourette syndrome, called WWC1, is involved in brain development and memory. Two of the other damaged genes considered to be probable risks for the disorder are involved in brain circuitry and the third is involved in gene expression which allows a cell to respond to its changing environment. “The fact of finding this one gene in two families would be like lightning striking the same individual twice,” says Gary Heiman, associate professor in the genetics department in the School of Arts and Sciences and a senior author on the project. “And it is the reason why it is crucial for us to continue studying families affected by this often debilitating disorder.” In conducting the study, blood samples were collected from family members to identify rare genetic mutations that are not inherited from their parents but occur spontaneously in affected individuals at birth. While many inherited diseases, such as sickle cell anemia, hemophilia, and cystic fibrosis, are caused by mutations to a single gene, this new research indicates that Tourette syndrome, like other neuropsychiatric disorders, is the result of multiple gene mutations. Rutgers researchers and their colleagues estimate that there are approximately 400 mutated genes that could pose a risk for Tourette syndrome, which affects one out of 100 people. The neuropsychiatric disorder—linked to problems in the basal ganglia, the part of the brain responsible for voluntary motor control, procedural learning, and eye movement, as well as cognitive and emotional function—is characterized by grimacing, eye blinking, and shoulder shrugging. It is often accompanied by co-occurring conditions, such as depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, or attention deficit disorder. Faith Rice, director of NJCTS, and mother of an adult son with the disorder, says those involved in this study are grateful to have been a part of the research. “It is very empowering for families to be involved in something that will make a difference,” says Rice. “Many are calling me and telling me that for the first time, this is giving them hope.” The scientists say more samples from families, in which only one child is affected with Tourette’s and both parents are available to participate, are needed to better understand how these and other damaging mutations lead to Tourette disorder. “I want to thank all the individuals with Tourette disorder and their family members from New Jersey, around the country, in Europe and South Korea for their participation and advocacy,” says Heiman. “Progress has been slow and disappointing up until now. But I think this research will lead to the development of more specific treatments that are personalized for individuals or groups of people.” Grants from the National Institute of Mental Health and New Jersey Center for Tourette Syndrome and Associated Disorders, Inc. funded the research. Researchers from Rutgers University-New Brunswick; University of California, San Francisco; Massachusetts General Hospital; the University of Florida; Yale University; and other institutions across the world participated in the study.


"These four up-and-coming artists have strong choreographic voices," said Jaffe. "We are proud to offer them a groundbreaking career opportunity to develop new works as we launch our UNCSA Choreographic Institute." Announced in February 2017, the two-track Choreographic Institute includes both the Development Residency and the Professional Residency. Jaffe and former Dean of Dance Ethan Stiefel, both former principal dancers with American Ballet Theatre, are the first professional residents, who will work with invited professional dancers for two weeks to research choreographic ideas or build toward new works. The institute's second track, the Development Residency, includes individual mentorship by Visiting Distinguished Artist Helen Pickett, who is resident choreographer for Atlanta Ballet. In addition to mentoring by Pickett, the choreographers will participate in daily technique classes, workshops and lectures led by esteemed UNCSA Summer Dance faculty and guests, and will hold afternoon rehearsals with their cast of dancers selected from the Summer Dance Intensives. In the evenings, residents will have access to UNCSA's studios for further choreographic research. The residencies will culminate in a fully produced performance of the new works. Kyle Davis trained at Makaroff School of Ballet and at Rock School for Dance Education and UNCSA. He joined PNB as an apprentice in 2008 and was promoted to corps de ballet in 2009 and soloist in 2016. In 2008, he won the Prix de Lausanne competition in Switzerland. He also won various awards in the Youth American Grand Prix Regional and Finals in 2005 and 2006. Marielis Garcia is a member of the Brian Brooks Moving Company and Peter Kyle Dance. In 2016, she premiered MG DanceArts. Garcia earned her B.F.A. in Dance from Marymount Manhattan College. She has danced with ODC of San Francisco, City Dance Ensemble, Douglas Dunn, Stefanie Battan Bland and Steps Repertory Ensemble, and toured South Africa teaching and performing with Ikapa Dance Theater. She teaches at Rutgers University, The Washington Heights Community Conservatory of Fine Arts and in New York City public schools. Charlotte Griffin's repertory has been commissioned by Juilliard Dance Ensemble,  Hartt School Dance Division, BJM Danse in Montreal, Danza UDLAP, Barcelona Institut del Teatre, Juilliard Summer Intensive, Peridance Professional Trainees, Princeton University and Rutgers University. She has created ballets at the New York Choreographic Institute, at the American Ballet Theatre Summer Intensive in Austin, and for Eliot Feld's Ballet Tech Kids Dance. Current projects include Bum Phillips All-American Opera for La MaMa's Ellen Stewart Theater in New York and The Cambrians' Empress Archer remix project, which premiered in Chicago in January 2017. Griffin studied with the American Dance Festival from 1994-1996. She has been a guest artist at ArcDanz in Mexico, Springboard Danse Montreal, The Yard, Cayman Island Arts Festival, and the Bates Dance Festival. Her award-winning dance films, BAREFOOT NEGOTIATIONS (2009) and RAVEN STUDY (2007), have screened internationally. Griffin received her B.F.A. in Dance from The Juilliard School and her M.F.A. in Dance from the University of Texas at Austin. She has taught at Marymount Manhattan College and Bowdoin College, and has offered master classes in Mexico, Spain, the Czech Republic, and South Korea.  Griffin is assistant professor of dance at the University of California, Irvine. Mari Meade graduated from the New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts and UNCSA. In 2009, she started Mari Meade Dance Collective (MMDC). Since that time, she has been an Artist-in-Residence at Chez Bushwick and Lake Studios Berlin (Germany). Meade's work has been shown at Lincoln Center, Danspace St. Mark's Church, STUFFED at Judson Memorial Church, FLICfest, Battery Dance Festival, New Orleans Fringe Festival, and Katlehong Arts Center (South Africa). In New York, she has danced for Dana Salisbury and the no-see-ums, Amanda Hinchey & Dancers, Celia Rowlson-Hall, CJ Holm, touche pas, and Barbie Diewald. She is currently a teaching artist for New York City Ballet and Dancing Classrooms. Helen Pickett has created more than 30 ballets in the United States and Europe. She  has twice been named the best choreographer in Atlanta.  In 2007, she was named to Dance Magazine's list of "25 to Watch."  She received a Choreographic Residency from Jacob's Pillow in 2008, and was one of the first recipients of the Jerome Robbins Foundation's New Essential Works Grant. She was nominated for an Isadora Duncan Dance award in 2013. She earned a Master of Fine Arts from Hollins University in 2011. Since 2005, she has guest starred in William Forsythe's award-winning postmodern ballet Impressing the Czar for the Royal Ballet of Flanders and Dresden Ballet in Germany. She has also performed the work in France, England, Scotland and China, and at the Lincoln Center Festival in New York. The University of North Carolina School of the Arts is America's first state-supported arts school, a unique stand-alone public university of arts conservatories. With a high school component, UNCSA is a degree-granting institution that trains young people of talent in dance, design and production, drama, filmmaking, and music. Established by the N.C. General Assembly in 1963, the School of the Arts opened in Winston-Salem ("The City of Arts and Innovation") in 1965 and became part of the University of North Carolina system when it was formed in 1972. For more information, visit www.uncsa.edu. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/unc-school-of-the-arts-announces-four-inaugural-choreographic-development-residents-for-summer-institute-300446703.html SOURCE University of North Carolina School of the Arts


Hey J.,Rutgers University
Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics | Year: 2010

Since Darwin first proposed that new species could arise without geographic separation, biologists have debated whether or not divergence occurs in the presence of gene exchange. Today we understand that new species can diverge while exchanging genes, depending on the strength of disruptive natural selection and the factors that affect the linkage relationships of genes under disruptive selection. This mode of diversificationdivergence with gene flowincludes sympatric speciation, in which gene exchange occurs since onset of divergence, and secondary contact following a period of geographic isolation, as well as all sorts of situations in which gene flow happens intermittently. In recent years, statistical tools have been developed that can reveal the action of gene flow during divergence. Isolation-with-migration (IM) models include parameters for population size, time of population separation, and gene exchange, and they have been used extensively to estimate levels of gene exchange. A survey of studies that have used these models shows that a plurality find little evidence of gene flow; however, many report nonzero gene exchange. Copyright © 2010 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Patent
Rutgers University and Silagene, Inc. | Date: 2014-10-31

Compositions and methods for modulating the expression of a protein of interest are provided.


Marzari N.,Theory and Simulation of Materials THEOS | Mostofi A.A.,Imperial College London | Yates J.R.,University of Oxford | Souza I.,University of the Basque Country | And 2 more authors.
Reviews of Modern Physics | Year: 2012

The electronic ground state of a periodic system is usually described in terms of extended Bloch orbitals, but an alternative representation in terms of localized "Wannier functions" was introduced by Gregory Wannier in 1937. The connection between the Bloch and Wannier representations is realized by families of transformations in a continuous space of unitary matrices, carrying a large degree of arbitrariness. Since 1997, methods have been developed that allow one to iteratively transform the extended Bloch orbitals of a first-principles calculation into a unique set of maximally localized Wannier functions, accomplishing the solid-state equivalent of constructing localized molecular orbitals, or "Boys orbitals" as previously known from the chemistry literature. These developments are reviewed here, and a survey of the applications of these methods is presented. This latter includes a description of their use in analyzing the nature of chemical bonding, or as a local probe of phenomena related to electric polarization and orbital magnetization. Wannier interpolation schemes are also reviewed, by which quantities computed on a coarse reciprocal-space mesh can be used to interpolate onto much finer meshes at low cost, and applications in which Wannier functions are used as efficient basis functions are discussed. Finally the construction and use of Wannier functions outside the context of electronic-structure theory is presented, for cases that include phonon excitations, photonic crystals, and cold-atom optical lattices. © 2012 American Physical Society.


Ma Q.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Lu A.Y.H.,Rutgers University
Pharmacological Reviews | Year: 2011

Individual variability in drug efficacy and drug safety is a major challenge in current clinical practice, drug development, and drug regulation. For more than 5 decades, studies of pharmacogenetics have provided ample examples of causal relations between genotypes and drug response to account for phenotypic variations of clinical importance in drug therapy. The convergence of pharmacogenetics and human genomics in recent years has dramatically accelerated the discovery of new genetic variations that potentially underlie variability in drug response, giving birth to pharmacogenomics. In addition to the rapid accumulation of knowledge on genome- disease and genome-drug interactions, there arises the hope of individualized medicine. Here we review recent progress in the understanding of genetic contributions to major individual variability in drug therapy with focus on genetic variations of drug target, drug metabolism, drug transport, disease susceptibility, and drug safety. Challenges to future pharmacogenomics and its translation into individualized medicine, drug development, and regulation are discussed. For example, knowledge on genetic determinants of disease pathogenesis and drug action, especially those of complex disease and drug response, is not always available. Relating the many gene variations from genomic sequencing to clinical phenotypes may not be straightforward. It is often very challenging to conduct large scale, prospective studies to establish causal associations between genetic variations and drug response or to evaluate the utility and cost-effectiveness of genomic medicine. Overcoming the obstacles holds promise for achieving the ultimate goal of effective and safe medication to targeted patients with appropriate genotypes.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 224.63K | Year: 2015

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant The goal of this STTR R proposal is to transfer the technology from Rutgers University to REAL Prevention needed to adapt a substance use prevention media literacy curriculum for web based delivery in community organizations for commercialization Substance use increases in frequency and risk through mid adolescence yet most prevention interventions target only early use and only in a limited number of settings such as schools Moreover they often fail to address the media saturated lives of youth despite research demonstrating the deleterious effects of advertising and entertainment media This project adapts the Youth Message Development YMD Curriculum for online access through H clubs This intervention develops critical perspective taking about peer substance use decisions and confers resistance to pro drug messages through youth analysis of pro drug alcohol cigarette smokeless tobacco media messages combined with interactive media manipulation and active involvement of youth in planning substance use prevention messages The curriculum demonstrates promising results when administered face to face during an NIH funded pilot research and the brief online format makes it ideal for use by national youth organizations Formative research will be used to adapt the Youth Message Development YMD prevention curriculum for web based use by H clubs The clubs provide access to youth with substance use prevalence reflective of national levels but outside of the school context that is standard for most interventions Refinements will incorporate interactive message manipulation features along with a new social proliferation approach that encourages H members to informally disseminate anti drug messages they create to peers and family members Pilot testing will be conducted to insure that the adaptation maximizes engaging features of the curriculum and an independent usability test will also be conducted Self report and observational measures of usability will be obtained In the short term this innovative brief intervention is expected to influence substance use norms expectancies and prevalence as well as the development of higher order critical thinking and decision making skills with ultimate substance use outcomes The social proliferation strategy insures that the effects also are spread widely among peers and family The delivery flexibility of the brief format with our community partner should foster immediate dissemination if successful potentially extending the intervention to million H members each year as well as to similar community based organizations such as Boys and Girls Club and YWCO YMCA as well as in the school setting through D A R E America Thus the proposal responds to NIDA PA Small Business Technology Transfer Grant Applications R calling for projects that stimulate a partnership of ideas and technologies between innovative small business concerns SBCs and non profit research institutions through Federally funded research or research and development R Randamp D and establish the technical scientific merit and feasibility of the proposed R Randamp D efforts PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE Adolescent substance abuse remains a significant public health concern and web based media literacy based interventions for community organizations that supplement other prevention strategies provide a promising innovative approach The proposed study will adapt a brief media literacy intervention for H clubs for use via interactive online delivery Our long term objective is to produce a widely and easily disseminated brief media literacy intervention that can be used alone or as a component to enhance effects of a broader curriculum for community and school contexts


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: INFRA-2012-3.2. | Award Amount: 884.74K | Year: 2012

Hydro-Meteorology Research (HMR) is an area of critical scientific importance and of high societal relevance. It plays a key role in guiding predictions relevant to the safety and prosperity of humans and ecosystems from highly urbanized areas, to coastal zones, and to agricultural landscapes. Of special interest and urgency within HMR is the problem of understanding and predicting the impacts of severe hydro-meteorological events, such as flash-floods and landslides in complex orography areas, on humans and the environment, under the incoming climate change effects.\nThus, building on existing but regional projects such as DRIHM (Distributed Research Infrastructure for Hydro-Meteorology, EU) and CESM (Community Earth System Model, US), DRIHM2US project will help in understanding the utilization of e-Infrastructures for advancing scientific collaboration on both sides of the Atlantic towards improving the predictive ability of severe storms and utilization of these predictions for hazard prediction and control under climate change effects. As such, HMR serves as a key example for the utilization of e-Infrastructures in Advancing Science of Service to Society and can be a lighthouse for broader directions within HMR and for other scientific disciplines.\nAlong these lines DRIHM2US will promote international cooperation between Europe and the USA for the development of a joint/common e-Infrastructure using Hydro-Meteorology Research (HMR) as an example, to ensure persistent availability and effective sharing of data and models across scientific disciplines, institutions, and national boundaries, specifically across the Atlantic.\nThe goal will be achieved by creating a forum of collaboration, based on a sequence of networking actvities with EU and US participants.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 1.37M | Year: 2013

In spite of its challenging properties, the utilization of graphene for technical applications still demands considerable efforts in developing dedicated processing methods, which have a potential to be adapted and finally utilized for industrial scale device manufacturing. Among the processes which have been investigated so far, chemical vapour deposition of graphene on copper, where copper acts as a catalyst to facilitate the growth of single layered graphene - appears to be one the most promising approaches. Although extensively studied, there are issues with this process related to quality, reproducibility and yield, which are connected to the lack of control of the interface between copper and graphene. Within the process, which we will be able to tackle these issues in a more controllable way by a combined in-situ deposition system, where copper and other possible metals are deposited within one vacuum system together with the graphene CVD, i.e without exposing the sample to an ambient environment. Like for 2D Ga-Al-As semiconductor heterostructures, the control of the interfaces on an atomic length scale by means of an in-situ multilayer deposition process is expected to be the pathway which will enable the ultilization of graphenes unqiue properties within manufacturable device structures. In spite of this potential, we feel the full integration of graphene into CMOS technology, although being extremely challenging on the long term - still has a very long way to go and may even be impossible without fundamentally different processing approaches. However, sensor technologies as a whole are mostly based on hybrid solutions, where the sensor itself - even chip based in some cases - is still separated from the CMOS digital electronic by flip chip, wire bonding or simple by conventional wiring. A widely used example of high indutrial impact are piezoelectric sensors, where the high processing temperature of the lead-zirconium-titanate ceramics are incompatible with CMOS processing conditions. Based on this philosophy, we believe that the in-situ growing approach for metal-graphene multilayers, as envisaged to be developed within this project, will enable a significant improvement of existing sensor concepts and the realization and manufacturing of new sensor concepts. Based on the expertise of our scientific partners within Imperial College and NPL and our associated partners from industry, we will focus on biosensor applications, where graphene - as carbon based material - is particularly challenging as bio-interface. As - from the point of view of process technology -the most simple approach, graphene coated copper electrodes will have a potential for radiofrequency - microwave - terahertz biosensor, where copper will outperform gold due to lower conduction losses and graphene provides the interface to the biomolecules and cells. As a second step on a scale of increasing complexity of process technology, we believe that a sacrificial layer process for arbitrary shaped free standing graphene membranes and (sub)micro scale flexural beam is a realistic development goal. This technology will enable the development of arrays of nanomechanical sensors, based on the exceptional mechanical properties of graphene. Apart from sensor applications, graphene- based NEMS structures are challenging objects for the refinement and exploration of metrology for nanotechnology and biology, as being pursued by our collaborators from NPL. The recently discovered confined plasmon-polariton excitations - originating from the unique electronic properties of graphene - are currently one of the hottest topic within the graphene research community. We believe, that the tailored free standing structures we will be able to manufacture with this deposition kit, will pave the way to explore and finally utilize this unique optical - infrared properties of graphene for novel sensor applications.


Patent
Rutgers University and Aquarius Biotechnologies, Inc. | Date: 2013-07-30

Unpurified or low pure soy phosphatidylserine is used to make cochleates. The cochleates contain about 40-74% soy phosphatidylserine, a multivalent cation and a biological active. A preferred cochleate contains the antifungal agent amphotericin B.

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