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Cabria M.T.,University of the Basque Country | Cabria M.T.,University of Liege | Gonzalez E.G.,CSIC - National Museum of Natural Sciences | Gomez-Moliner B.J.,University of the Basque Country | And 6 more authors.
BMC Evolutionary Biology | Year: 2015

Background: The European mink (Mustela lutreola, L. 1761) is a critically endangered mustelid, which inhabits several main river drainages in Europe. Here, we assess the genetic variation of existing populations of this species, including new sampling sites and additional molecular markers (newly developed microsatellite loci specific to European mink) as compared to previous studies. Probabilistic analyses were used to examine genetic structure within and between existing populations, and to infer phylogeographic processes and past demography. Results: According to both mitochondrial and nuclear microsatellite markers, Northeastern (Russia, Estonia and Belarus) and Southeastern (Romania) European populations showed the highest intraspecific diversity. In contrast, Western European (France and Spain) populations were the least polymorphic, featuring a unique mitochondrial DNA haplotype. The high differentiation values detected between Eastern and Western European populations could be the result of genetic drift in the latter due to population isolation and reduction. Genetic differences among populations were further supported by Bayesian clustering and two main groups were confirmed (Eastern vs. Western Europe) along with two contained subgroups at a more local scale (Northeastern vs. Southeastern Europe; France vs. Spain). Conclusions: Genetic data and performed analyses support a historical scenario of stable European mink populations, not affected by Quaternary climate oscillations in the Late Pleistocene, and posterior expansion events following river connections in both North- and Southeastern European populations. This suggests an eastern refuge during glacial maxima (as already proposed for boreal and continental species). In contrast, Western Europe was colonised more recently following either natural expansions or putative human introductions. Low levels of genetic diversity observed within each studied population suggest recent bottleneck events and stress the urgent need for conservation measures to counteract the demographic decline experienced by the European mink. © 2015 Cabria et al. Source


Saveljev A.P.,Russian Research Institute Of Game Management And For Farming | Batbayar N.,Administration of Tes sum | Boldbaatar S.,Ministry of Environment and Green Development of Mongolia | Dashbiamba B.,Ministry of Environment and Green Development of Mongolia
Russian Journal of Theriology | Year: 2016

For the purpose of preservation of a unique gene pool of autochthonous beavers Castor fiber birulai in 1985-2002 daughter population in adjoining regions of NW Mongolia and South Tuva (Tes River / Tesijn gol basin) has been introduced (Stubbe et al., 2005). Today this local population has reached 150 animals (Saveljev et al., 2015). The physical condition of the beavers that were caught by a sort of natural "ecological trap" late February, 2015 is described. As the result of extreme frosts animals have been blocked by frazil in the lodge and had no access to forage. Local people have released five animals from this ice captivity. All beavers had gnawed tails. Absence in this area of terrestrial large predators allows to assume with high degree of confidence that the reason of traumas at animals was self- (or allo-) gnawing. The facts of placentophagy and piscivory of beavers and infestation by opisthorchosis as well, as cases of predation and scavenging among mammals (the "obligate" phytophages) are discussed. © RUSSIAN JOURNAL OF THERIOLOGY, 2016. Source


Safonov V.G.,Russian Research Institute Of Game Management And For Farming
Russian Journal of Theriology | Year: 2016

In the Soviet Union experimental kill trapping (removal trapping) of Eurasian beaver began in 1960 in the Kirov region, and since 1963 the limited kill trapping was also permitted throughout Russia and Belarus. Regular trapping allowed obtaining large amounts of biomaterial, which significantly widened our knowledge on the general population ecology of beavers and on their behaviour during the under-ice period when observation is limited. The current decrease in demand for furs requires the realization of scientifically sound measures for beaver management based on ecological priorities. © RUSSIAN JOURNAL OF THERIOLOGY, 2016. Source


Cabria M.T.,University of Liege | Gonzalez E.G.,CSIC - National Museum of Natural Sciences | Gomez-Moliner B.J.,University of the Basque Country | Michaux J.R.,Institut Universitaire de France | And 5 more authors.
BMC Evolutionary Biology | Year: 2015

Background: The European mink (Mustela lutreola, L. 1761) is a critically endangered mustelid, which inhabits several main river drainages in Europe. Here, we assess the genetic variation of existing populations of this species, including new sampling sites and additional molecular markers (newly developed microsatellite loci specific to European mink) as compared to previous studies. Probabilistic analyses were used to examine genetic structure within and between existing populations, and to infer phylogeographic processes and past demography. Results: According to both mitochondrial and nuclear microsatellite markers, Northeastern (Russia, Estonia and Belarus) and Southeastern (Romania) European populations showed the highest intraspecific diversity. In contrast, Western European (France and Spain) populations were the least polymorphic, featuring a unique mitochondrial DNA haplotype. The high differentiation values detected between Eastern and Western European populations could be the result of genetic drift in the latter due to population isolation and reduction. Genetic differences among populations were further supported by Bayesian clustering and two main groups were confirmed (Eastern vs. Western Europe) along with two contained subgroups at a more local scale (Northeastern vs. Southeastern Europe; France vs. Spain). Conclusions: Genetic data and performed analyses support a historical scenario of stable European mink populations, not affected by Quaternary climate oscillations in the Late Pleistocene, and posterior expansion events following river connections in both North- and Southeastern European populations. This suggests an eastern refuge during glacial maxima (as already proposed for boreal and continental species). In contrast, Western Europe was colonised more recently following either natural expansions or putative human introductions. Low levels of genetic diversity observed within each studied population suggest recent bottleneck events and stress the urgent need for conservation measures to counteract the demographic decline experienced by the European mink. © 2015 Cabria et al. Source


Brandler O.V.,Russian Academy of Sciences | Nikol'sky A.A.,Peoples Friendship University of Russia | Kolesnikov V.V.,Russian Research Institute Of Game Management And For Farming
Biology Bulletin | Year: 2010

The spatial distribution of two marmot species Marmota baibacina and M. sibirica in a zone of coexistence was studied by using their alarm call as a diagnostic trait. It was found that M. baibacina prefers to inhabit bouldery screes, whereas M. sibirica inhabits all suitable biotopes. The difference in biotopic distribution of these species could be explained by M. sibirica forcing M. baibacina out of optimum habitats. Cases of coexistence of both species in one family group sites were registered, which might contribute to the appearance of hybrids. © 2010 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. Source

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