Russian Research Institute Of Game Management And For Farming

Kirov, Russia

Russian Research Institute Of Game Management And For Farming

Kirov, Russia
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Cabria M.T.,University of the Basque Country | Cabria M.T.,University of Liège | Gonzalez E.G.,CSIC - National Museum of Natural Sciences | Gomez-Moliner B.J.,University of the Basque Country | And 6 more authors.
BMC Evolutionary Biology | Year: 2015

Background: The European mink (Mustela lutreola, L. 1761) is a critically endangered mustelid, which inhabits several main river drainages in Europe. Here, we assess the genetic variation of existing populations of this species, including new sampling sites and additional molecular markers (newly developed microsatellite loci specific to European mink) as compared to previous studies. Probabilistic analyses were used to examine genetic structure within and between existing populations, and to infer phylogeographic processes and past demography. Results: According to both mitochondrial and nuclear microsatellite markers, Northeastern (Russia, Estonia and Belarus) and Southeastern (Romania) European populations showed the highest intraspecific diversity. In contrast, Western European (France and Spain) populations were the least polymorphic, featuring a unique mitochondrial DNA haplotype. The high differentiation values detected between Eastern and Western European populations could be the result of genetic drift in the latter due to population isolation and reduction. Genetic differences among populations were further supported by Bayesian clustering and two main groups were confirmed (Eastern vs. Western Europe) along with two contained subgroups at a more local scale (Northeastern vs. Southeastern Europe; France vs. Spain). Conclusions: Genetic data and performed analyses support a historical scenario of stable European mink populations, not affected by Quaternary climate oscillations in the Late Pleistocene, and posterior expansion events following river connections in both North- and Southeastern European populations. This suggests an eastern refuge during glacial maxima (as already proposed for boreal and continental species). In contrast, Western Europe was colonised more recently following either natural expansions or putative human introductions. Low levels of genetic diversity observed within each studied population suggest recent bottleneck events and stress the urgent need for conservation measures to counteract the demographic decline experienced by the European mink. © 2015 Cabria et al.


Cabria M.T.,University of the Basque Country | Cabria M.T.,University of Liège | Michaux J.R.,University of Liège | Gomez-Moliner B.J.,University of the Basque Country | And 6 more authors.
Molecular Ecology | Year: 2011

Human-mediated global change will probably increase the rates of natural hybridization and genetic introgression between closely related species, and this will have major implications for conservation of the taxa involved. In this study, we analyse both mitochondrial and nuclear data to characterize ongoing hybridization and genetic introgression between two sympatric sister species of mustelids, the endangered European mink (Mustela lutreola) and the more abundant polecat (M. putorius). A total of 317 European mink, 114 polecats and 15 putative hybrid individuals were collected from different localities in Europe and genotyped with 13 microsatellite nuclear markers. Recently developed Bayesian methods for assigning individuals to populations and identifying admixture proportions were applied to the genetic data. To identify the direction of hybridization, we additionally sequenced mtDNA and Y chromosomes from 78 individuals and 29 males respectively. We found that both hybridization and genetic introgression occurred at low levels (3% and 0.9% respectively) and indicated that hybridization is asymmetric, as only pure polecat males mate with pure European mink females. Furthermore, backcrossing and genetic introgression was detected only from female first-generation (F1) hybrids of European mink to polecats. This latter result implies that Haldane's rule may apply. Our results suggest that hybridization and genetic introgression between the two species should be considered a rather uncommon event. However, the current low densities of European mink might be changing this trend. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Cabria M.T.,University of Liège | Gonzalez E.G.,CSIC - National Museum of Natural Sciences | Gomez-Moliner B.J.,University of the Basque Country | Michaux J.R.,Institut Universitaire de France | And 5 more authors.
BMC Evolutionary Biology | Year: 2015

Background: The European mink (Mustela lutreola, L. 1761) is a critically endangered mustelid, which inhabits several main river drainages in Europe. Here, we assess the genetic variation of existing populations of this species, including new sampling sites and additional molecular markers (newly developed microsatellite loci specific to European mink) as compared to previous studies. Probabilistic analyses were used to examine genetic structure within and between existing populations, and to infer phylogeographic processes and past demography. Results: According to both mitochondrial and nuclear microsatellite markers, Northeastern (Russia, Estonia and Belarus) and Southeastern (Romania) European populations showed the highest intraspecific diversity. In contrast, Western European (France and Spain) populations were the least polymorphic, featuring a unique mitochondrial DNA haplotype. The high differentiation values detected between Eastern and Western European populations could be the result of genetic drift in the latter due to population isolation and reduction. Genetic differences among populations were further supported by Bayesian clustering and two main groups were confirmed (Eastern vs. Western Europe) along with two contained subgroups at a more local scale (Northeastern vs. Southeastern Europe; France vs. Spain). Conclusions: Genetic data and performed analyses support a historical scenario of stable European mink populations, not affected by Quaternary climate oscillations in the Late Pleistocene, and posterior expansion events following river connections in both North- and Southeastern European populations. This suggests an eastern refuge during glacial maxima (as already proposed for boreal and continental species). In contrast, Western Europe was colonised more recently following either natural expansions or putative human introductions. Low levels of genetic diversity observed within each studied population suggest recent bottleneck events and stress the urgent need for conservation measures to counteract the demographic decline experienced by the European mink. © 2015 Cabria et al.


Saveljev A.P.,Russian Research Institute Of Game Management And For Farming | Batbayar N.,Administration of Tes sum | Boldbaatar S.,Ministry of Environment and Green Development of Mongolia | Dashbiamba B.,Ministry of Environment and Green Development of Mongolia
Russian Journal of Theriology | Year: 2016

For the purpose of preservation of a unique gene pool of autochthonous beavers Castor fiber birulai in 1985-2002 daughter population in adjoining regions of NW Mongolia and South Tuva (Tes River / Tesijn gol basin) has been introduced (Stubbe et al., 2005). Today this local population has reached 150 animals (Saveljev et al., 2015). The physical condition of the beavers that were caught by a sort of natural "ecological trap" late February, 2015 is described. As the result of extreme frosts animals have been blocked by frazil in the lodge and had no access to forage. Local people have released five animals from this ice captivity. All beavers had gnawed tails. Absence in this area of terrestrial large predators allows to assume with high degree of confidence that the reason of traumas at animals was self- (or allo-) gnawing. The facts of placentophagy and piscivory of beavers and infestation by opisthorchosis as well, as cases of predation and scavenging among mammals (the "obligate" phytophages) are discussed. © RUSSIAN JOURNAL OF THERIOLOGY, 2016.


Brandler O.V.,Russian Academy of Sciences | Nikol'sky A.A.,Peoples' Friendship University of Russia | Kolesnikov V.V.,Russian Research Institute Of Game Management And For Farming
Biology Bulletin | Year: 2010

The spatial distribution of two marmot species Marmota baibacina and M. sibirica in a zone of coexistence was studied by using their alarm call as a diagnostic trait. It was found that M. baibacina prefers to inhabit bouldery screes, whereas M. sibirica inhabits all suitable biotopes. The difference in biotopic distribution of these species could be explained by M. sibirica forcing M. baibacina out of optimum habitats. Cases of coexistence of both species in one family group sites were registered, which might contribute to the appearance of hybrids. © 2010 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.


Safonov V.G.,Russian Research Institute Of Game Management And For Farming
Russian Journal of Theriology | Year: 2016

In the Soviet Union experimental kill trapping (removal trapping) of Eurasian beaver began in 1960 in the Kirov region, and since 1963 the limited kill trapping was also permitted throughout Russia and Belarus. Regular trapping allowed obtaining large amounts of biomaterial, which significantly widened our knowledge on the general population ecology of beavers and on their behaviour during the under-ice period when observation is limited. The current decrease in demand for furs requires the realization of scientifically sound measures for beaver management based on ecological priorities. © RUSSIAN JOURNAL OF THERIOLOGY, 2016.


Scopin A.E.,Russian Research Institute Of Game Management And For Farming | Gashkova I.V.,Russian Research Institute Of Game Management And For Farming | Saveljev A.P.,Russian Research Institute Of Game Management And For Farming | Abramov A.V.,Russian Academy of Sciences
Vertebrate Zoology | Year: 2015

We have carried out histological studies of the gastrointestinal tract of Laotian rock rat Laonastes aenigmamus. Most of the inner surface of the stomach is a cardiac region having reduced glands. Generally the cardiac glands are located near the esophagus. The esophagus and the ventricular groove are lined by keratinized stratified squamous epithelium. The region containing fundic (proper gastric) glands occupies a small area of the stomach. The maximum thickness of the gastrointestinal wall has been determined for the hindstomach and duodenum. The minimum wall thickness has been determined for ileum, colon, and cecum. In the large intestine, the glands are weakly developed and this can mean that there is not an active digestion in this gut site. Our results confirm the fact that foregut fermentation is crucial in digestion for this rodent. The topography of the regions, occupied by different types of mucosa in the stomach, has a convergent similarity to ones that are found in ruminant-like marsupials and points to similar adaptations to the consumption of plant foods. Owing to the small body mass of the rodents, the distribution of foregut fermentation is exceptionally rare in evolutionary history. © Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung, 2015.


Bochkov A.V.,Russian Academy of Sciences | Saveljev A.P.,Russian Research Institute Of Game Management And For Farming
Parazitologiya | Year: 2014

Four native species of parasitic mites belonging to the genus Schizocarpus Trouessart, 1896 (Acariformes: Chirodiscidae) are recorded on the North American beaver Castor canadensis Kuhl, 1820 (Rodentia: Castoridae) from Russia. Totally ten beavers from all three main geographically isolated populations of in Russia (Leningrad Province, Voronezh Biosphere Reserve (beaver farm) and Khabarovsk Territory) were examined. Additionally, in captivity (Voronezh beaver farm) eight species were recorded switched from the Eurasian beaver Castor fiber Linnaeus, 1758 on C. canadensis.


PubMed | University of Warmia and Mazury and Russian Research Institute Of Game Management And For Farming
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Theriogenology | Year: 2016

This study describes the identification and a broad-based characterization of the pregnancy-associated glycoprotein (PAG) genes expressed in the synepitheliochorial placenta of the Alces alces (Aa; N=51). We used: (1) both size measurements (cm) of various Aa embryos/fetuses (crown-rump length) and placentomes (PLCs); (2) PCR, Southern and sequencing; (3) Western-blot for total placental glycoproteins; (4) deglycosylation of total cotyledonary proteins; and (5) double heterologous IHC for cellular immune-localization of the PAGs as pregnancy advanced (50-200days post coitum). The crown-rump length and PLC size measurements permitted a novel pattern estimation of various pregnancy stages in wild Aa. The PLC number varied (5-21) and was the greatest at the mid and late stages of gestation in females bearing singletons or twins. The genomic existence of the identified PAG-like family was named AaPAG-L. Amplicon profiles of the AaPAG-L varied in the number and length (118-2000bp). Southern with porcine cDNA probes confirmed specificity and revealed dominant AaPAG-L amplicons in males and females. Nucleotide sequences of the AaPAG-L amplicons shared 86.27% homology with the bovine PAG1 (bPAG1) gene. Amino acid AaPAG sequences revealed in silico 88.23% to 100% homology with the bPAG1 precursor. Western-blots revealed a dominant mature 55 kDa AaPAG fraction, and the major 48 kDa glycosylated form that was deglycosylated to 44kDa. The AaPAG-Ls was immuno-localized to mono- and bi-nucleated trophectodermal cells (TRD-chorionic epithelium), where signal intensity resembled intense TRD proliferation within developing PLCs as pregnancy advanced. This is the first study identifying the AaPAG-L family in the largest representative among the Cervidae.

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