Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Radioecology

Obninsk, Russia

Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Radioecology

Obninsk, Russia
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Fesenko S.,International Atomic Energy Agency | Isamov N.,Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Radioecology | Barnett C.L.,UK Center for Ecology and Hydrology | Beresford N.A.,UK Center for Ecology and Hydrology | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Environmental Radioactivity | Year: 2015

Extensive studies on transfer of radionuclides to animals were carried out in the USSR from the 1950s. Few of these studies were published in the international refereed literature or taken into account in international reviews. This paper continues a series of reviews of Russian language literature on radionuclide transfer to animals, providing information on biological half-lives of radionuclides in various animal tissues. The data are compared, where possible, with those reported in other countries. The data are normally quantified using a single or double exponential accounting for different proportions of the loss. For some products, such as milk, biological half-lives tend to be rapid at 1-3d for most radionuclides and largely described by a single exponential. However, for other animal products biological half-lives can vary widely as they are influenced by many factors such as the age and size of the animal. Experimental protocols, such as the duration of the study, radionuclide administration and/or sample collection protocol also influence the value of biological half-lives estimated. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Fesenko S.,International Atomic Energy Agency | Fesenko J.,Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Radioecology | Sanzharova N.,Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Radioecology | Karpenko E.,Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Radioecology | Titov I.,Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Radioecology
Journal of Environmental Radioactivity | Year: 2011

Around 130 publications reporting studies on radionuclide transfer to freshwater biota species conducted in the former USSR were reviewed to provide the concentration ratio values. None of these studies were available up to now in the English language reviews or publications. The values derived have been compared with the CR values used for freshwater systems in the International reviews. For some radionuclides reviewed in this paper, the data are in good agreement with the mean CR values presented earlier, however for some of them, in particular, for 241Am (bivalve molluscs, gastropods and pelagic fish), 60Co (gastropods, benthic fish and insect larvae), 90Sr and 137Cs (benthic fish and zooplankton), the mean values given here are substantially different from those presented earlier. The data reported in this paper for thirty five radionuclides and eleven groups of freshwater species markedly improve the extent of available data for evaluation of radiation impact on freshwater species. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Fesenko S.,International Atomic Energy Agency | Jacob P.,Helmholtz Center Munich | Ulanovsky A.,Helmholtz Center Munich | Chupov A.,International Atomic Energy Agency | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Environmental Radioactivity | Year: 2013

Following the accident at the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl a number of different remedial actions were developed and implemented in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine. Recommendations on the application of countermeasures and remedial actions were published by the IAEA as "Guidelines for agricultural countermeasures following an accidental release of radionuclides" in 1994. Since then, new information on the behaviour of radionuclides in the environment and effectiveness of countermeasures in the long term has been obtained and reviewed by many projects, including the Chernobyl Forum. Additionally, new approaches to derive remediation strategies were developed and successfully implemented in the most affected countries. This paper describes a justification of the remediation strategies suggested for rehabilitation of the areas most affected by the Chernobyl accident based on this experience. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Ulanovsky A.,Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research | Jacob P.,Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research | Fesenko S.,International Atomic Energy Agency | Bogdevitch I.,Research Institute for Soil Science and Agrochemistry | And 2 more authors.
Radiation and Environmental Biophysics | Year: 2011

Radioactive contamination of the environment following the Chernobyl accident still provide a substantial impact on the population of affected territories in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine. Reduction of population exposure can be achieved by performing remediation activities in these areas. Resulting from the IAEA Technical Co-operation Projects with these countries, the program ReSCA (Remediation Strategies after the Chernobyl Accident) has been developed to provide assistance to decision makers and to facilitate a selection of an optimized remediation strategy in rural settlements. The paper provides in-depth description of the program, its algorithm, and structure. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.


PubMed | International Atomic Energy Agency, Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Radioecology and UK Center for Ecology and Hydrology
Type: | Journal: Journal of environmental radioactivity | Year: 2015

Extensive studies on transfer of radionuclides to animals were carried out in the USSR from the 1950s. Few of these studies were published in the international refereed literature or taken into account in international reviews. This paper continues a series of reviews of Russian language literature on radionuclide transfer to animals, providing information on biological half-lives of radionuclides in various animal tissues. The data are compared, where possible, with those reported in other countries. The data are normally quantified using a single or double exponential accounting for different proportions of the loss. For some products, such as milk, biological half-lives tend to be rapid at 1-3 d for most radionuclides and largely described by a single exponential. However, for other animal products biological half-lives can vary widely as they are influenced by many factors such as the age and size of the animal. Experimental protocols, such as the duration of the study, radionuclide administration and/or sample collection protocol also influence the value of biological half-lives estimated.

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