Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials

Moscow, Russia

Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials

Moscow, Russia

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Vysikaylo P.I.,Russian Academy of Sciences | Mitin V.S.,Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials | Mitin A.V.,Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials | Krasnobaev N.N.,Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials | Belyaev V.V.,Peoples' Friendship University of Russia
IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science | Year: 2015

A previously proposed mechanism of adhesion of a plasma metal coating to a ceramic substrate is investigated experimentally. This adhesion mechanism is based on the increase in the concentration of structural defects (vacancies) and electron exchange interaction of a metal-oxide beryllium pair during the plasma thermal activation of the process. Given the brazing of ceramic products with hard solders in hydrogen, the coating composition for metallization is determined. The optimal temperature of reactive plasma metals coating for strong adhesion to the ceramic substrate is found. Methods to improve the technology of plasma vacuum metallization using ion-plasma magnetron sputtering and ion implantation are proposed. © 1973-2012 IEEE.


Ustinov O.A.,Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials | Yakunin S.A.,Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials
Atomic Energy | Year: 2016

A scheme for trapping the nitrogen oxides released during operations with liquids in radiochemical technologies is develop-ed: the outgoing gases containing nitrogen oxides pass through a dephlegmator (in the process of dissolution of fuel or wastes) or bubbler condenser (in the process of denitration and vitrification), through FSGO and FARTOS filters after water aerosols are introduced into them, and through the RFTBL and then SMOG apparatus after the next water-aerosol portion is introduced. The proposed solution is incorporated in the technological schemes of the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing module in the on-site nuclear fuel cycle of the BREST reactor. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York


Tyumentsev A.N.,Tomsk State University | Ditenberg I.A.,Tomsk State University | Grinyaev K.V.,Tomsk State University | Chernov V.M.,Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials | Potapenko M.M.,Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials
Journal of Nuclear Materials | Year: 2011

Microstructure and mechanical properties of V-4Ti-4Cr alloys subject to their thermo-mechanical processing (TMP) regimes were investigated. As a plastic deformation technique was used multiple multi-directional forge molding (MDFM) that removes restrictions on the plastic deformation value and the number of TMP cycles while the specimen shape is maintained. The use of MDFM results in finer grain size and more uniform spatial distribution of the secondary phase particles. Also it allows to form fine-crystal structural states in the final TMP stage and brings significant increase in high-temperature short-time strength of the alloy. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Reshetnikov F.G.,Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials
Atomic Energy | Year: 2011

The problem of stable energy can be addressed by using fast reactors operating on uranium-plutonium fuel in a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Such reactors are found to not only burn but also produce plutonium with breeding to 100% and more. F. M. Mitenkov from the Afrikantov Experimental Design Bureau of Mechanical Engineering (OKBM) and his colleagues assert with proof that when the fuel burnup increases to 17% and especially to 20% fast reactors will surpass thermal reactors with respect to the economic indicators. It is also reported that power plutonium with the following isotopic composition is used to fabricate mixed uranium-plutonium fuel for Japanese reactors. In Russia, spent fuel from thermal VVER-1000 reactors has been reprocessed partially. Technical-economic calculations need to be performed taking account of the construction of new, larger plants for reprocessing spent fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle.


Golovnin I.S.,Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials
Atomic Energy | Year: 2011

The All Union Research Institute for Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) in 1953 was given the technical task of developing and fabricating fuel elements with kernels made of metallic plutonium for the zero-power BF-1 facility, the first physical-nuclear fast-neutron facility in the country. A requirement was set to ensure that such fuel elements would also work in the next experimental facility BF-2 which was being designed. The possibility of a local decrease of the volume on cool-down below the region of existence of plutonium below 100-150°C in connection with possible decay of the alloy was taken into account. After the research program was completed, BF-2 was replaced by a more powerful facility BR-5 and physical startup occurred in 1958. The need for successive search for systems that operate reliably led to the use as the material for the BR-5 fuel core plutonium dioxide, metallurgically completely compatible with corrosion-resistant steel cladding in a wide temperature range.


Vysikaylo P.I.,RAS Institute of Chemistry | Mitin V.S.,Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials | Mitin A.V.,Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials | Krasnobaev N.N.,Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials | Belyaev V.V.,Moscow State University
IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science | Year: 2015

This paper reports a theoretical study of the mechanism of adhesion of a plasma metal coating to a ceramic substrate by an example of beryllium oxide. The adhesion mechanism is based on an increase in the concentration of structural defects (vacancies) and electron exchange interaction of a metal-beryllium oxide pair during the plasma thermal activation of the process. The proposed analysis of the substrate boundary conditions on an example of titanium atoms and beryllium oxide justifies the optimal regime of the coating deposition in plasma (heating temperature, deposition time, and activation energy) with the maximum adhesion of the plasma metal coating. It is in good agreement with the experimental studies. According to the analytical calculations, the substrate temperature for an ideal surface as well as the maximum adhesion of the plasma metal coating is 1230 K in the case of beryllium oxide, whereas the experimental temperature is about 1380 K. © 1973-2012 IEEE.


Titov A.O.,Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials
Atomic Energy | Year: 2016

Methods for depositing functional and protective coatings on articles used in the nuclear engineering and for general industrial purposes that have been developed at VNIINM are described. The methods and their advantages are examined and applications are substantiated. Examples of the adoption of the technologies described are presented. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York


Semenov A.A.,Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials
Atomic Energy | Year: 2016

The work on beryllium technologies performed at VNIINM over the years of its existence is described. The role of VNIINM in the creation and re-creation of the domestic production of materials based on metallic beryllium, beryllium oxide, and beryllium hydride is reflected. The unique properties of each material are examined in detail and the prospects for using the materials in science and engineering are presented. The prospects for creating new materials for x-ray and synchrotron engineering are especially noted: beryllium windows for extracting x-ray radiation and refraction x-ray lenses made from beryllium. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York


Shishov V.N.,Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials
ASTM Special Technical Publication | Year: 2011

A review is given on the effect of neutron irradiation on the microstructure and properties of Zr-Nb and Zr-Nb-Fe (Sn,O) alloys. The inreactor performance of Zr alloys is dependent on their composition and microstructure, and even small changes in the composition and processing lead to substantial changes in properties as a result of evolution of precipitates and matrix composition. The development of a new generation of alloys of Zr-Nb-Fe (Sn,O) system (that show higher resistance to the irradiationinduced growth, creep, and corrosion) required an examination of their microstructure during the manufacturing process and evolution after neutron irradiation. The basic irradiation phenomena involve irradiation-induced damages (formation of the a- and c-component dislocations) and redistribution of alloying elements. The influence produced by precipitates containing Zr, Nb, and particularly Fe on the properties under irradiation is demonstrated. Relationships between composition, microstructure, and irradiation-induced growth of the Zr-Nb-Fe-Sn are described. An increased content of iron (over limit of the solubility) in Zr-Nb alloys leads to lower irradiation growth and creep and to strengthening of the matrix as a result of Fe leaving Laves phase (HCP) particles with their transformation into β-Nb (bcc). β-Nb precipitates become depleted in niobium (or enriched in zirconium), and finely dispersed irradiation-induced secondary particles enriched in niobium are formed. The basic microstructures that illustrate neutron damage structures, precipitates instability, evolution, and irradiation growth are shown and discussed. Copyright © 2011 by ASTM International.


Shishov V.N.,Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials
Journal of ASTM International | Year: 2010

A review is given on the effect of neutron irradiation on the microstructure and properties of Zr-Nb and Zr-Nb-Fe (Sn,O) alloys. The in-reactor performance of Zr alloys is dependent on their composition and microstructure, and even small changes in the composition and processing lead to substantial changes in properties as a result of evolution of precipitates and matrix composition. The development of a new generation of alloys of Zr-Nb-Fe (Sn,O) system (that show higher resistance to the irradiation-induced growth, creep, and corrosion) required an examination of their microstructure during the manufacturing process and evolution after neutron irradiation. The basic irradiation phenomena involve irradiation-induced damages (formation of the a- and c-component dislocations) and redistribution of alloying elements. The influence produced by precipitates containing Zr, Nb, and particularly Fe on the properties under irradiation is demonstrated. Relationships between composition, microstructure, and irradiation-induced growth of the Zr-Nb-Fe-Sn are described. An increased content of iron (over limit of the solubility) in Zr-Nb alloys leads to lower irradiation growth and creep and to strengthening of the matrix as a result of Fe leaving Laves phase (HCP) particles with their transformation into β-Nb (bcc). β-Nb precipitates become depleted in niobium (or enriched in zirconium) and finely dispersed irradiation-induced secondary particles enriched in niobium are formed. The basic microstructures that illustrate neutron damage structures, precipitates instability, evolution, and irradiation growth are shown and discussed. Copyright © 2010 by ASTM International.

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