Russell Sage College

Troy, NY, United States

Russell Sage College

Troy, NY, United States
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Laboratory studies provide a fundamental understanding of photochemical processes in planetary atmospheres. Photochemical reactions taking place on giant planets like Jupiter and possibly comets and the interstellar medium are the subject of this research. Reaction pathways are proposed for the coupled photochemistry of NH3 (ammonia) and C2H2 (acetylene) within the context Jupiter’s atmosphere. We then extend the discussion to the Great Red Spot, Extra-Solar Giant Planets, Comets and Interstellar Organic Synthesis. Reaction rates in the form of quantum yields were measured for the decomposition of reactants and the formation of products and stable intermediates: HCN (hydrogen cyanide), CH3CN (acetonitrile), CH3CH = N-N = CHCH3 (acetaldazine), CH3CH = N-NH2 (acetaldehyde hydrazone), C2H5NH2 (ethylamine), CH3NH2 (methylamine) and C2H4 (ethene) in the photolysis of NH3/C2H2 mixtures. Some of these compounds, formed in our investigation of pathways for HCN synthesis, were not encountered previously in observational, theoretical or laboratory photochemical studies. The quantum yields obtained allowed for the formulation of a reaction mechanism that attempts to explain the observed results under varying experimental conditions. In general, the results of this work are consistent with the initial observations of Ferris and Ishikawa (1988). However, their proposed reaction pathway which centers on the photolysis of CH3CH = N-N = CHCH3 does not explain all of the results obtained in this study. The formation of CH3CH = N-N = CHCH3 by a radical combination reaction of CH3CH = N• was shown in this work to be inconsistent with other experiments where the CH3CH = N• radical is thought to form but where no CH3CH = N-N = CHCH3 was detected. The importance of the role of H atom abstraction reactions was demonstrated and an alternative pathway for CH3CH = N-N = CHCH3 formation involving nucleophilic reaction between N2H4 and CH3CH = NH is advanced. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Saavedra-Matiz C.A.,New York State Department of Health | Isabelle J.T.,New York State Department of Health | Biski C.K.,New York State Department of Health | Duva S.J.,New York State Department of Health | And 7 more authors.
Clinical Chemistry | Year: 2013

BACKGROUND: Dried blood spot (DBS) samples have been widely used in newborn screening (NBS) for the early identification of disease to facilitate the presymptomatic treatment of congenital diseases in newborns. As molecular genetics knowledge and technology progresses, there is an increased demand on NBS programs for molecular testing and a need to establish reliable, low-cost methods to perform those analyses. Here we report a flexible, cost-efficient, high-throughput DNA extraction method from DBS adaptable to small- and large-scale screening settings. METHODS: Genomic DNA (g.DNA) was extracted from single 3-mm diameter DBS by the sequential use of red cell lysis, detergent-alkaline, and acid-neutralizing buffers routinely used in whole blood and plant tissue DNA extractions. We performed PCR amplification of several genomic regions using standard PCR conditions and detection methods (agarose gel, meltingcurve analysis, TaqMan-based assays). Amplicons were confirmed by BigDye® Terminator cycle sequencing and compared with reference sequences. RESULTS: High-quality g.DNA was extracted from hundreds of DBS, as proven by mutation detection of several human genes on multiple platforms. Manual and automated extraction protocols were validated. Quantification of g.DNA by Oligreen® fluorescent nucleic acid stain demonstrated a normal population distribution closely corresponding with white blood cell counts detected in newborn populations. CONCLUSIONS: High-quality, amplifiable g.DNA is extractable from DBSs. Our method is adaptable, reliable, and scalable to low- and high-throughput NBS at low cost ($0.10/sample). This method is routinely used for molecular testing in the New York State NBS program. © 2013 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.


Moses J.I.,Space Science Institute | Visscher C.,Lunar and Planetary Institute | Keane T.C.,Russell Sage College | Sperier A.,University of St. Thomas, Texas
Faraday Discussions | Year: 2010

Using one-dimensional thermochemical/photochemical kinetics and transport models, we examine the chemistry of nitrogen-bearing species in the Jovian troposphere in an attempt to explain the low observational upper limit for HCN. We track the dominant mechanisms for interconversion of N2-NH 3 and HCN-NH3 in the deep, high-temperature troposphere and predict the rate-limiting step for the quenching of HCN at cooler tropospheric altitudes. Consistent with some other investigations that were based solely on time-scale arguments, our models suggest that transport-induced quenching of thermochemically derived HCN leads to very small predicted mole fractions of hydrogen cyanide in Jupiter's upper troposphere. By the same token, photochemical production of HCN is ineffective in Jupiter's troposphere: CH4-NH3 coupling is inhibited by the physical separation of the CH4 photolysis region in the upper stratosphere from the NH3 photolysis and condensation region in the troposphere, and C 2H2-NH3 coupling is inhibited by the low tropospheric abundance of C2H2. The upper limits from infrared and submillimetre observations can be used to place constraints on the production of HCN and other species from lightning and thundershock sources. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.PR.com

Receive press releases from In Focus Brands: By Email The MASH Card Expands to Second Campus The Albany student-created, startup community with benefits app-The MASH Card- has expanded their student community to Sage Colleges of Albany after 1 month of intensive system build outs with In Focus Brands. Albany, NY, December 15, 2016 --( The Sages Colleges wanted the MASH Card present on campus to add to the inclusive culture of the school, to bring more benefits to their students and to further the bonds between the local businesses and the campus. Events are currently being planned to kick off the Spring Semester. Some results from the first month of the Diamond Point Co-Development Funding include: a 20% increase in vendors joining with 65% of all current vendors giving a 15% or more discount to MASH members; 30% of our student members saving more than $10 per month with The MASH Card and a 60% Engagement with our email and social media campaigns. Ben Refael, Co-Founder of The MASH Card, comments, “Expanding a company is never easy, expanding a startup is near impossible but In Focus Brands and their smart scaling systems plus team on-the-ground execution model have worked wonders. The MASH Team is ready for a great 2017.” Tiran Koren, CEO of The MASH Card, adds: “In less than a year, we went from a small team with an idea to a legitimate company with full scaling operations. This further proves our initial concept. Our next steps are to create more unique events and member/vendor benefits. We never stop asking students and vendors what else they want and need to be a little happier. This is what drives us every day and what we are bringing to the Sage Campus.” Robert Manasier, Chief Brand and Management Strategist for In Focus Brands’ Team, explains: “Most firms scale too early so we spent this month creating the branded systems and processes that allowed us to hire and train new members to The MASH Card Team and to guarantee a consistent service deliver and member experience before we began servicing another campus. Our growth strategy includes adding a new campus every 12-14 weeks with that process accelerating in the future as we work out any issues we encounter and as we develop the managerial staff from our current hires in house. The MASH Team has been a phenomenal partner to work with our In Focus Brands’ Team on the ground.” Up next for the Mash Card Launch Team, adding new senior staff (CTO), starting a crowdfunding campaign for added infrastructure needs and recruiting sales executives to grow the campus and the vendor base regionally (over 70 establishments already have signed into the MASH Universe). Reconfiguring the app experience; adding the job board for vendors to hire from; scheduling more interactive events and a casting for new branded media content for the site are also on the list. The MASH Card (www.themashcard.com) The Community With Benefits Platform has built a digital engagement platform that connects brick and mortar businesses to the college student community. The focus on making all happy with great discounts, an experiential community and prizes for students, more customers for businesses and many events for all are the passion points for this startup In Focus Brands (www.infocusbrands.com) focuses on creatively practical solutions-Ideas to Action; Action to Revenue. The international company is an execution firm that operates 3 businesses internally: the culture/change/strategic brand builder, the management operations firm and multiple funding sources. These integrated services bring deployable teams and resources to our clients’ present needs and structures branded systems and staffs that perform exceptionally for the future. Diamond Point Co-Development Fund is a royalty-based fund started by Robert Manasier and In Focus Brands that creates more flexibility during the startup phase and focuses on delivering funding and resources to execute to a branded plan for proof of concept or launch stage companies. http://www.infocusbrands.com/co-development-fund Sage Colleges of Albany (www.sage.edu) is a private educational institution comprising three colleges in New York: Russell Sage College in Troy, New York, Sage College of Albany and the Sage Graduate School, which operates both in Troy and in Albany. The School of Management at The Sage Colleges has programs at both the graduate and undergraduate level, with classes being offered in Albany, Saratoga, and online. Albany, NY, December 15, 2016 --( PR.com )-- After one month in the trenches with In Focus Brands, The MASH Card has added the Sage Colleges of Albany to their footprint. The month has also seen a doubling of operational staff, staff development training and a working team of junior developers to improve the app and website.The Sages Colleges wanted the MASH Card present on campus to add to the inclusive culture of the school, to bring more benefits to their students and to further the bonds between the local businesses and the campus. Events are currently being planned to kick off the Spring Semester.Some results from the first month of the Diamond Point Co-Development Funding include: a 20% increase in vendors joining with 65% of all current vendors giving a 15% or more discount to MASH members; 30% of our student members saving more than $10 per month with The MASH Card and a 60% Engagement with our email and social media campaigns.Ben Refael, Co-Founder of The MASH Card, comments, “Expanding a company is never easy, expanding a startup is near impossible but In Focus Brands and their smart scaling systems plus team on-the-ground execution model have worked wonders. The MASH Team is ready for a great 2017.”Tiran Koren, CEO of The MASH Card, adds: “In less than a year, we went from a small team with an idea to a legitimate company with full scaling operations. This further proves our initial concept. Our next steps are to create more unique events and member/vendor benefits. We never stop asking students and vendors what else they want and need to be a little happier. This is what drives us every day and what we are bringing to the Sage Campus.”Robert Manasier, Chief Brand and Management Strategist for In Focus Brands’ Team, explains: “Most firms scale too early so we spent this month creating the branded systems and processes that allowed us to hire and train new members to The MASH Card Team and to guarantee a consistent service deliver and member experience before we began servicing another campus. Our growth strategy includes adding a new campus every 12-14 weeks with that process accelerating in the future as we work out any issues we encounter and as we develop the managerial staff from our current hires in house. The MASH Team has been a phenomenal partner to work with our In Focus Brands’ Team on the ground.”Up next for the Mash Card Launch Team, adding new senior staff (CTO), starting a crowdfunding campaign for added infrastructure needs and recruiting sales executives to grow the campus and the vendor base regionally (over 70 establishments already have signed into the MASH Universe). Reconfiguring the app experience; adding the job board for vendors to hire from; scheduling more interactive events and a casting for new branded media content for the site are also on the list.The MASH Card (www.themashcard.com) The Community With Benefits Platform has built a digital engagement platform that connects brick and mortar businesses to the college student community. The focus on making all happy with great discounts, an experiential community and prizes for students, more customers for businesses and many events for all are the passion points for this startupIn Focus Brands (www.infocusbrands.com) focuses on creatively practical solutions-Ideas to Action; Action to Revenue. The international company is an execution firm that operates 3 businesses internally: the culture/change/strategic brand builder, the management operations firm and multiple funding sources. These integrated services bring deployable teams and resources to our clients’ present needs and structures branded systems and staffs that perform exceptionally for the future.Diamond Point Co-Development Fund is a royalty-based fund started by Robert Manasier and In Focus Brands that creates more flexibility during the startup phase and focuses on delivering funding and resources to execute to a branded plan for proof of concept or launch stage companies.http://www.infocusbrands.com/co-development-fundSage Colleges of Albany (www.sage.edu) is a private educational institution comprising three colleges in New York: Russell Sage College in Troy, New York, Sage College of Albany and the Sage Graduate School, which operates both in Troy and in Albany. The School of Management at The Sage Colleges has programs at both the graduate and undergraduate level, with classes being offered in Albany, Saratoga, and online. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from In Focus Brands


Lamonica K.,Aurora University | Lamonica K.,Russell Sage College | Ding H.-L.,Aurora University | Ding H.-L.,Xuzhou Medical College | Artinger K.B.,Aurora University
Genesis | Year: 2015

Cranial neural crest cells are specified and migrate into the pharyngeal arches where they subsequently interact with the surrounding environment. Signaling and transcription factors, such as prdm1a regulate this interaction, but it remains unclear which specific factors are required for posterior pharyngeal arch development. Previous analysis suggests that prdm1a is required for posterior ceratobranchial cartilages in zebrafish and microarray analysis between wildtype and prdm1a mutants at 25 h post fertilization demonstrated that integrin α5 (itga5) is differentially expressed in prdm1a mutants. Here, we further investigate the interaction between prdm1a and itga5 in zebrafish craniofacial development. In situ hybridization for itga5 demonstrates that expression of itga5 is decreased in prdm1a mutants between 18 and 31 h post fertilization and itga5 expression overlaps with prdm1a in the posterior arches, suggesting a temporal window for interaction. Double mutants for prdm1a;itga5 have an additive viscerocranium phenotype more similar to prdm1a mutants, suggesting that prdm1a acts upstream of itga5. Consistent with this, loss of posterior pharyngeal arch expression of dlx2a, ceratobranchial cartilages 2-5, and cell proliferation in prdm1a mutants can be rescued with itga5 mRNA injection. Taken together, these data suggest that prdm1a acts upstream of itga5 and are both necessary for posterior pharyngeal arch development in zebrafish. genesis 53:270-277, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Joshi P.C.,Russell Sage College | Gray T.A.,Russell Sage College | Keane T.C.,Russell Sage College
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety | Year: 2012

Riboflavin (RF) is a potent photosensitizer producing extensive degradation of purine and pyrimidine derivatives of nucleic acids under UVA, UVB and sunlight. In this study we have demonstrated that reactive O 2 species generated by photosensitized RF under UVB were responsible for the degradation of DNA and RNA bases. While 1O 2 accounted for the degradation of adenine, guanine, thymine and uracil, O 2 -·also contributed to partial degradation of adenine. Cytosine remained unaffected by the synergistic action of RF and UVB. Ascorbic acid, glutathione, glycolic acid and quercetin showed remarkable protection (88-100%) against photodegradation of bases. Sorbitol was effective in preventing photodegradation of guanine. These naturally occurring antioxidants are potential candidates for prevention against oxidative stress caused by photosensitization. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


Joshi P.C.,Russell Sage College | Joshi P.C.,Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute | Li H.H.,Russell Sage College | Merchant M.,Russell Sage College | Keane T.C.,Russell Sage College
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications | Year: 2014

The guanine base of nucleic acids is known to be very reactive towards degradation by 1O2-induced oxidative stress. Oxidative reactions of DNA are linked to many human diseases including cancer. Among the various forms of reactive O2 species (OH, 1O2 or O2-), the oxidative stress caused by 1O2 is of particular physiologic importance because of its selectively long life in aqueous medium and its ability to diffuse through a cell membrane. In this study we investigated the degradation of a model compound guanosine (Guo) by 1O2, which was generated by riboflavin-induced photosensitization and by molybdate ion catalyzed disproportionation of H2O2. We observed the remarkable ability of an aqueous and alcoholic extracts of Turmeric (Curcuma longa) as an extraordinary scavenger of 1O2 to completely inhibit the degradation of Guo. The alcoholic extracts were more effective in their antioxidant activity than the corresponding water extract. This naturally occurring antioxidant offers a most economical supplement to protect biologically significant molecules from the oxidative stress induced by 1O2. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Obuya E.A.,Binghamton University State University of New York | Harrigan W.,Binghamton University State University of New York | Andala D.M.,Binghamton University State University of New York | Lippens J.,Russell Sage College | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Molecular Catalysis A: Chemical | Year: 2011

Pd nanoparticle catalysts supported on photoactive titania nanofibers were investigated and evaluated with respect to model C-C coupling reactions. Titania nanofibers were prepared via the electrospinning technique, followed by in situ formation of the Pd nanoparticles catalyst on the TiO2 support. Pd nanoparticles of between 2 and 5 nm were successfully stabilized on the surface of electrospun nanofibers which had diameters between 150 ± 50 nm. The new catalyst was found to have increased surface area and improved catalytic functions compared to commercially available materials or other Pd-TiO 2 catalysts produced by different modes of synthesis. The activity and selectivity of 0.05 mol% Pd-TiO2 catalyst in the Heck reaction has been investigated with a careful look into the nature of starting materials and products under varying conditions of temperature, solvent and base. The catalyst was found to be highly active under air atmosphere with reaction temperatures of up to 160 °C. Optimized reaction conditions resulted in a 98% yield of trans-stilbene for the iodobenzene-styrene system with a TOF value of 7.85 min-1. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Hughes-Morey G.,Russell Sage College
American Journal of Physical Anthropology | Year: 2016

Objectives This study examines adult stature and its association with risk of mortality in two skeletal collections from industrializing London, taking sex and socioeconomic status into account as potential sources of heterogeneity in frailty. Methods Mean femur and tibia lengths and the distributions of short femora and tibiae were examined in adult skeletons from the cemeteries at Lower Saint Bride's (low status) and Chelsea Old Church (high status). Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine if stature was associated with risk of mortality and how that relationship varied with sex and socioeconomic status. Results High-status females had significantly longer femora, but not tibiae, on average, than low-status females. There were no status-based differences in mean element lengths among males. There were sex and status based differences in the distribution of short femora and tibiae, and there was a significant negative association between tibia length and risk of mortality in high-status females. Discussion The results may be explained by differences in subadult mortality, potentially due to variation in infant feeding practices. Low-status infants were more likely to live in pathogenic environments and less likely to be breastfed, leading to both stature and immunological deficits, thus minimizing the association between adult stature and mortality, as the shortest individuals did not survive into adulthood. The ways in which migration and repeated epidemics of plague may have shaped stature variation during industrialization are also discussed, highlighting the importance of context in understanding the association between stature and mortality. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Joshi P.C.,Russell Sage College | Keane T.C.,Russell Sage College
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications | Year: 2010

DNA and RNA undergo photodegradation in UVC (200-290. nm) due to direct absorption by the purine and pyrimidine bases. Limited effects are observed under UVB (290-320. nm) or UVA (320-400. nm). We have observed that an endogenous photosensitizer, riboflavin (RF), upon exposure to UVB or UVA can extensively damage the DNA and RNA bases. Guanine, uracil, thymine, adenine and cytosine were degraded by 100%, 82%, 60.4%, 46.3% and 10.3% under UVA (12. J) and by 100%, 54.1%, 38.9%, 42.2% and <1.0% under UVB (6. J), respectively. Guanosine and deoxyguanosine were degraded by 98 ± 1.0% and 80 ± 1.0% under UVA (4. J) and UVB (12. J), respectively. With an exception of GMP (53-82%), dGMP (51-88%) and to some extent TMP (3-4%) the remaining nucleosides and nucleotides were resistant to RF-induced photodecomposition. The photodegradation of G derivatives by RF was 2-fold higher than a well known photodynamic agent rose bengal. A comparison of the intensities of UVA and UVB sources used in this study with natural sunlight suggests that exposure with the latter along with an endogenous photosensitizer can have similar effects on DNA and RNA depending upon the duration of exposure. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

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