Ruijin Hospital

Shanghai, China

Ruijin Hospital

Shanghai, China

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News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

PARIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--EOS imaging (Paris:EOSI)(Euronext, FR0011191766 – EOSI), the pioneer in 2D/3D orthopedic medical imaging, today announced the first two installations of EOS systems in China at Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital and Ruijin Hospital. Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, provides service to approximately 80 million residents of Jiangsu Province. The hospital is a reference center in China for adult and pediatric orthopedic and spi


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

PARIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Regulatory News: EOS imaging (Paris:EOSI) (Euronext, FR0011191766 – EOSI), the pioneer in 2D/3D orthopedic medical imaging, today announced the first two installations of EOS systems in China at Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital and Ruijin Hospital. Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, provides service to approximately 80 million residents of Jiangsu Province. The hospital is a reference center in China for adult and pediatric


Since its inception, MMAAP foundation has awarded over 40 Fellowship and Project grants to support the work of exceptional physician scientists and investigators with the vision, drive and dedication to find new and innovative ways towards advancements in the targeted medical fields. These outstanding award recipients represent more than 20 prestigious Chinese medical institutions including Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Xijing Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Peking University Institute of Hematology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, and others. "The visionary leadership of MMAAP Foundation Chairman and Founder, Howard P. Milstein, has brought together and funded exchanges between outstanding researchers, medical talent, and institutions in these regions," said Sean X. Leng, MD, PhD, President of MMAAP Foundation. "The 2017 recipients are among the most talented investigators in their fields and our support of their work is vital to both furthering medical research and strengthening relations between the U.S. and China." Grant applications were evaluated through a two-step peer review process according to the National Institute of Health standard. Panels of Chinese and U.S. experts in their respective fields jointly reviewed all proposals, and finalists were submitted for approval by MMAAP Foundation. The U.S. panels in Geriatrics, Skin Disease, Hematology, Reproductive Medicine, and Translational Medicine include members of the American Geriatrics Society, Medical Advisory Committee of American Skin Association, New York Blood Center, Jones Foundation for Reproductive Medicine, as well as members of other leading U.S. institutions in each field. The mission of Milstein Medical Asian American Partnership Foundation (MMAAP Foundation) is to improve world health by developing mutually beneficial partnerships between the U.S. and China, as well as greater Asia. Working with some of the premier health organizations in the world, MMAAP Foundation brings together and funds exchanges among the best research, medical talent, and institutions in the regions. This strategy is a high priority for MMAAP Foundation's founder Howard P. Milstein. MMAAP Foundation is a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization. For more than 50 years, the Milstein family has been actively involved in health-related and medical philanthropy. MMAAP Foundation builds upon this distinguished history in five areas: Senior Healthcare, Skin Disease and Melanoma, Reproductive Biology, Blood Research, and Translational Medicine. MMAAP Foundation works in close collaboration with other medical organizations supported by the Milstein family, including American Skin Association, Milstein Melanoma Research Program at The Rockefeller University, Howard and Georgeanna Jones Foundation for Reproductive Medicine, New York Blood Center, and the Program for Translational Chemical Biology at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center. For more information, please visit MMAAP Foundation's website at www.mmaapf.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/milstein-medical-asian-american-partnership-foundation-announces-2017-fellowship-and-project-awards-300447740.html


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

Dublin, Dec. 20, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "HDAC Inhibitors Market, 2016 - 2026" report to their offering. The HDAC Inhibitors Market, 2016-2026 report was commissioned to examine the current landscape and the future outlook of the growing pipeline of products in this area. HDACs have been studied in cellular processes such as apoptosis, autophagy, metabolism, DNA damage repair, cell cycle control and senescence. Altered expression of HDACs has been observed in different tumors; this makes them a potential target for treatment of cancer and other genetic or epigenetic related disorders. Inhibition of HDACs has shown positive results in disruption of multiple cell signaling pathways and prevention of tumor growth. The study provides a detailed market forecast and opportunity analysis for the time period 2016-2026. The research, analysis and insights presented in this report include potential sales of the approved drugs and the ones in late stages of development (phase III and phase II). To add robustness to our model, we have provided three scenarios for our market forecast; these include the conservative, base and optimistic scenarios. Our opinions and insights, presented in this study were influenced by several discussions we conducted with experts in this area. All actual figures have been sourced and analyzed from publicly available information forums and primary research discussions. Financial figures mentioned in this report are in USD, unless otherwise specified. Example Highlights - Nearly 90 HDAC inhibitors are currently in clinical / preclinical stages of development; the clinical molecules account for over 30% of the pipeline while over 60% is captured by molecules in the preclinical / discovery stage. - With 66% of the pipeline molecules targeting oncological indications, cancer remains one of the most widely studied field for HDAC inhibitors. Within oncology, hematological malignancies such as PTCL and CTCL are popular targets; three HDAC inhibitors (Zolinza, ISTODAX® and BELEODAQ®) are approved for these indications. Other therapeutic areas such as autoimmune disorders, infectious diseases, inflammatory disorders, neurological disorders, are also gradually gaining traction. - Although the market was initially led by the large-size pharma players (such as Celgene, Merck, Novartis), the current market is characterized by the presence of several small / mid-sized pharma players. Notable examples of the small and mid-sized firms include 4SC, Chroma Therapeutics, CrystalGenomics, Curis, Evgen Pharma, FORUM Pharmaceuticals, Karus Therapeutics, Mirati Therapeutics, MEI Pharma, Shenzhen Chipscreen Biosciences, Syndax Pharmaceuticals and TetraLogic Pharmaceuticals. - In addition, there are several non-industry institutes and universities that are primarily carrying out preclinical research. Examples of these include Harvard Medical School (BG45), Imperial College London (C1A), Kyoto University (Jd, Sd), National Taiwan University (Quinazolin-4-one derivatives), Taipei Medical University (MPT0E028), University of Messina (MC-1575, MC-1568). - Four of the five approved drugs are pan-HDAC inhibitors targeting HDAC isoforms non-specifically. However, in the past few years, several class selective HDAC inhibitors have entered the clinic; these are associated with a higher efficacy and result in decreased toxicity from the treatment. Of the total HDAC inhibitors identified, 52% of the molecules are class specific; of these, 33% molecules target Class I specific isoforms and the rest target Class II specific isoforms of HDACs. Notable examples of molecules targeting class-specific HDACs includeentinostat (phase III), resminostat (phase II), SHP-141 (phase II), mocetinostat (phase II), CHR-3996 (phase I/II) and ricolinostat (phase I/II). - The HDAC inhibitors market is expected to grow at a healthy annual rate of 32% over the next decade.With multiple potential target indications, Istodax® is expected to capture the largest market share (close to 21%) in 2026, followed by entinostat, Farydak® and Beleodaq®. Key Topics Covered: 1. Preface 1.1. Scope Of The Report 1.2. Research Methodology 1.3. Chapter Outlines 2. Executive Summary 3. Introduction 3.1. The Central Dogma of Molecular Biology and Cell Cycle 3.2. DNA: Structure and Functions 3.3. Fundamentals of Epigenetics 3.3.1. Effect of Histone Modification on DNA Based Processes 3.3.2. Chromatin Structure Modification and its Enzymes 3.4. Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) 3.4.1. Classification of HDACs 3.4.2. Role of HDACs and HDAC Inhibitors in Cellular Processes 3.5. HDAC Inhibitors 3.5.1. Structure and Classification 3.5.2. Different Types of HDAC Inhibitors 3.5.3. Therapeutic Applications of HDAC Inhibitors 4. HDAC Inhibitors: Market Landscape 4.1. Chapter Overview 4.2. Development Pipeline of HDAC Inhibitors 4.3. Distribution by Phase of Development 4.4. Distribution by Therapeutic Area 4.5. Distribution by Class Specificity 4.6. Distribution by Type of Developer 4.7. Distribution by Geography 4.8. Active Industry Players 5. Drug Profiles: Marketed And Late-Stage HDAC Inhibitors 5.1. Chapter Overview 5.2. Company and Drug Profiles: Marketed and Phase III Molecules 5.2.1. Celgene Corporation 5.2.3. Novartis 5.2.4. Shenzhen Chipscreen Biosciences 5.2.5. Syndax Pharmaceuticals 5.3. Drug Profiles: Phase II Molecules 5.3.1. Abexinostat (PCI-24781) 5.3.2. CUDC-907 5.3.3. FRM-0334 (EVP-0334) 5.3.4. Givinostat (ITF2357) 5.3.5. Mocetinostat (MGCD103) 5.3.6. Pracinostat (SB939) 5.3.7. Resminostat (4SC-201) 5.3.8. SFX-01 5.3.9. SHAPE (SHP-141) 5.3.10. Tefinostat (CHR-2845) 6. Key Insights: Therapeutic Area, Class Specificity, Clinical Endpoints 6.1. Clinical Development Analysis: Class Specificity and Therapeutic Areas 6.2. Clinical Development Analysis: Developer Landscape 6.3. Clinical Development Analysis: Trial Endpoint Comparison 7. Market Forecast And Opportunity Analysis 7.1. Chapter Overview 7.2. Scope and Limitations 7.3. Forecast Methodology 7.4. Overall HDAC Inhibitors Market 7.5. HDAC Inhibitors Market: Individual Forecasts 7.5.1. Zolinza (Merck) 7.5.2. Istodax® (Celgene Corporation) 7.5.3. Beleodaq® (Onxeo) 7.5.4. Farydak® (Novartis) 7.5.5. Epidaza® (Shenzhen Chipscreen Biosciences) 7.5.6. Entinostat (Syndax Pharmaceuticals) 7.5.7. Abexinostat (Pharmacyclics) 7.5.8. CUDC-907 (Curis) 7.5.9. FRM-0334 (FORUM Pharmaceuticals) 7.5.10. Mocetinostat (Mirati Therapeutics) 7.5.11. Pracinostat (MEI Pharma) 7.5.12. Resminostat (4SC, Menarini, Yakult Honsha) 7.5.13. SFX-01 (Evgen Pharma) 7.5.14. SHP-141 (TetraLogic Pharmaceuticals) 7.5.15. Tefinostat (Chroma Therapeutics) 8. Publication Analysis 8.1. Chapter Overview 8.2. HDAC Inhibitors: Publications 8.3. Publication Analysis: Quarterly Distribution 8.4. Publication Analysis: Distribution by HDAC Inhibitor Class 8.5. Publication Analysis: Distribution by Drugs Studied 8.6. Publication Analysis: Distribution by Therapeutic Area 8.7. Publication Analysis: Distribution by Journals 8.8. Publication Analysis: Distribution by Phase of Development 8.9. Publication Analysis: Distribution by Type of Therapy 9. Social Media: Emerging Trends 9.1. Chapter Overview 9.1.1. Trends on Twitter 9.1.2. Trends on Facebook 10. Conclusion 10.1. The Pipeline is Healthy with Several Molecules in Preclinical Stages of Development 10.2. HDAC Inhibitors Cater to a Wide Spectrum of Disease Areas 10.3. Class Specific HDAC Inhibitors Have Been Explored for a More Targeted Approach 10.4. The Interest is Gradually Rising Amongst Both Industry and Non-Industry Players 10.5. Supported by a Robust Preclinical Pipeline, HDAC Inhibitors are Expected to Emerge as A Multi-Billion Dollar Market 11. Interview Transcripts 11.1. Chapter Overview 11.2. Dr. Simon Kerry, CEO, Karus Therapeutics 11.3. Dr. James Christensen, CSO and Senior VP, Mirati Therapeutics 11.4. Dr. Hyung J. Chun, MD, FAHA, Associate Professor of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine 12. Appendix 1: Tabulated Data 13. Appendix 2: List Of Companies And Organizations Companies Mentioned - 4SC - AACR - AbbVie - Acceleron Pharma - Acetylon Pharmaceuticals - Active Biotech - Agios Pharmaceuticals - ASH - Arno Therapeutics - Astellas Pharma - Bayer Schering Pharma - Baylor College of Medicine - BioMarin - Bionor Immuno - bluebird bio - Case Comprehensive Cancer Center - Celera Genomics - Celgene - Celleron Therapeutics - Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie - CETYA Therapeutics - CHDI Foundation - Chipscreen Biosciences - Chong Kun Dang Pharmaceutical - Chroma Therapeutics - Croix-Rousse Hospital - CrystalGenomics - Curis - DAC - Diaxonhit - DNA Therapeutics - Duke University - ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group - Eddingpharm - Eisai - Epizyme - Errant Gene Therapeutics - European Calcified Tissue Society - Evgen Pharma - FORMA Therapeutics - FORUM Pharmaceuticals - Fudan University - Genentech - Genextra - Gilead - Gloucester Pharmaceuticals - GNT Biotech - GSK - Harvard Medical School - Henan Cancer Hospital - HUYA Biosciences - Ikerchem - Imperial College London - In2Gen - International Bone and Mineral Society - Israel Cancer Association and Bar Ilan University - Italfarmaco - Johnson and Johnson - Kalypsys - Karus Therapeutics - King's College, University of London - Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine - Kyoto University - Kyowa Hakko Kirin - Leukemia and Lymphoma Society - Lymphoma Academic Research Organization - Massachusetts General Hospital - Mayo Clinic - MedImmune - MEI Pharma - Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center - Menarini - Merck - MethylGene - Mirati Therapeutics - Morphosys - Mundipharma-EDO - National Brain Research Centre - National Comprehensive Cancer Network - National Taiwan University - NCI - Novartis - NuPotential - Oceanyx Pharma - Oncolys Biopharma - Onxeo - Onyx - Orchid Pharma - Paterson Institute for Cancer Research - Pfizer - Pharmacyclics - Pharmion Corporation - Quimatryx - Quintiles - Repligen - Respiratorius - Roche - Rodin Therapeutics - Royal Veterinary College, University of London - Ruijin Hospital - S*Bio - Sarcoma Alliance for Research through Collaboration - Seattle Genetics - Servier Canada - Shape Pharmaceuticals - Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center - Sigma Tau Pharmaceuticals - Signal Rx - SpeBio - Spectrum Pharmaceuticals - Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research - Sutro Biopharma - Syndax Pharmaceuticals - Synovo GmbH - Taipei Medical University - TetraLogic Pharmaceuticals - University of Liverpool - University of Messina - University of Miami - Vanderbilt University School of Medicine - Ventana Medical Systems - Vilnius University - Yakult Honsha - Yale University - Yonsei University College of Medicine For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/srvj3j/hdac_inhibitors


Zhu Y.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Xu X.-Y.,Ruijin Hospital
Foot and Ankle Specialist | Year: 2015

The role of arthroereises in the treatment of adult acquired flatfoot deformity (AAFD) has been controversial. This study aims to evaluate the outcome of subtalar arthroereisis in treating stage II AAFD. A total of 24 feet with stage II AAFD were treated surgically between 2009 and 2011 using subtalar arthroereisis. The average follow-up was 29.7 months (range = 24 to 35 months). The average postoperative AOFAS (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society) Ankle-Hindfoot Scale score was 85.6 (compared with 51.7 preoperatively). Average preoperative talar-first metatarsal angle and talonavicular coverage angle were −13.9° and 38.3°, respectively. The average postoperative angles were 1.6° and 11.2°, respectively (P <.01). No deformity recurrences were found at the time of last follow-up, with the exception of 1 case. Subtalar arthroereisis appears to be a reasonable treatment option for stage IIA and IIC AAFD. It can be used alone to correct mild hindfoot valgus, and it can also be performed with a calcaneal osteotomy to gain more correction in severe stage II AAFD. Levels of Evidence: Therapeutic, Level IV: Retrospective Case Series © 2014 The Author(s).


Zhang Y.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Zhang Y.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | Du Y.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Le W.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | And 4 more authors.
Antioxidants and Redox Signaling | Year: 2011

Cellular redox homeostasis is the first line of defense against diverse stimuli and is crucial for various biological processes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), byproducts of numerous cellular events, may serve in turn as signaling molecules to regulate cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, when overproduced ROS fail to be scavenged by the antioxidant system, they may damage cellular components, giving rise to senescent, degenerative, or fatal lesions in cells. Accordingly, this review not only covers general mechanisms of ROS production under different conditions, but also focuses on various types of ROS-involved diseases, including atherosclerosis, ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. In addition, potentially therapeutic agents and approaches are reviewed in a relatively comprehensive manner. However, due to the complexity of ROS and their cellular impacts, we believe that the goal to design more effective approaches or agents may require a better understanding of mechanisms of ROS production, particularly their multifaceted impacts in disease at biochemical, molecular, genetic, and epigenetic levels. Thus, it requires additional tools of omics in systems biology to achieve such a goal. © 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Sonneveld M.J.,Erasmus Medical Center | Hansen B.E.,Erasmus Medical Center | Piratvisuth T.,Prince of Songkla University | Jia J.-D.,Capital Medical University | And 6 more authors.
Hepatology | Year: 2013

On-treatment levels of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) may predict response to peginterferon (PEG-IFN) therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB), but previously proposed prediction rules have shown limited external validity. We analyzed 803 HBeAg-positive patients treated with PEG-IFN in three global studies with available HBsAg measurements. A stopping-rule based on absence of a decline from baseline was compared to a prediction-rule that uses HBsAg levels of <1,500 IU/mL and >20,000 IU/mL to identify patients with high and low probabilities of response. Patients with an HBsAg level <1,500 IU/mL at week 12 achieved response (HBeAg loss with HBV DNA <2,000 IU/mL at 6 months posttreatment) in 45%. At week 12, patients without a decline in HBsAg achieved a response in 14%, compared to only 6% of patients with HBsAg >20,000 IU/mL, but performance varied across HBV genotype. In patients treated with PEG-IFN monotherapy (n=465), response rates were low in patients with genotypes A or D if there was no decline of HBsAg by week 12 (negative predictive value [NPV]: 97%-100%), and in patients with genotypes B or C if HBsAg at week 12 was >20,000 IU/mL (NPV: 92%-98%). At week 24, nearly all patients with HBsAg >20,000 IU/mL failed to achieve a response, irrespective of HBV genotype (NPV for response and HBsAg loss 99% and 100%). Conclusion: HBsAg is a strong predictor of response to PEG-IFN in HBeAg-positive CHB. HBV genotype-specific stopping-rules may be considered at week 12, but treatment discontinuation is indicated in all patients with HBsAg >20,000 IU/mL at week 24, irrespective of HBV genotype. © 2013 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

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