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Jones R.G.,University of Kent | Kitayama T.,Osaka University | Wilks E.S.,Canterbury Hills | Fox R.B.,6115 Wiscasset Road | And 15 more authors.
Kemija u industriji/Journal of Chemists and Chemical Engineers | Year: 2016

A new source-based nomenclature system is described which indicates that a particular polymer has been chemically modified. A connective within the name of a polymer, -mod-, is introduced for this purpose as in poly[(A)-mod-(B)]. The system is intended to be used in accordance with source-based naming of polymers but also provides for the use of structure-based names when it is unavoidable. It embraces: (1) modification of a constitutional unit into another, the unique structure of which is known; and (2) a more general modification of a constitutional unit resulting in any one of a number of possible structures. In addition, a new symbol, ∼>, is proposed for use in graphic representations of the structure of modified polymers.


Jarm V.,Rudolfa Bicanica 18
Kemija u industriji/Journal of Chemists and Chemical Engineers | Year: 2014

Like most of the materials used by humans, polymeric materials are proposed in the literature and occasionally exploited clinically, as such, as devices or as part of devices, by surgeons, dentists, and pharmacists to treat traumata and diseases. Applications have in common the fact that polymers function in contact with animal and human cells, tissues, and/or organs. More recently, people have realized that polymers that are used as plastics in packaging, as colloidal suspension in paints, and under many other forms in the environment, are also in contact with living systems and raise problems related to sustainability, delivery of chemicals or pollutants, and elimination of wastes. These problems are basically comparable to those found in therapy. Last but not least, biotechnology and renewable resources are regarded as attractive sources of polymers. In all cases, water, ions, biopolymers, cells, and tissues are involved. Polymer scientists, therapists, biologists, and ecologists should thus use the same terminology to reflect similar properties, phenomena, and mechanisms. Of particular interest is the domain of the so-called ·egradable or biodegradable polymers·that are aimed at providing materials with specific time-limited applications in medicine and in the environment where the respect of living systems, the elimination, and/or the bio-recycling are mandatory, at least ideally.


Jarm V.,Rudolfa Bicanica 18
Kemija u industriji/Journal of Chemists and Chemical Engineers | Year: 2016

The universal adoption of an agreed nomenclature has never been more important for the description of chemical structures in publishing and online searching. The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC)1a,b and Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS)2 make similar recommendations. The main points are shown here with hyperlinks to original documents. Further details can be found in the IUPAC Purple Book3.


Jarm V.,Rudolfa Bicanica 18
Kemija u industriji/Journal of Chemists and Chemical Engineers | Year: 2016

This document provides some basic rules and guidelines regarding the use and creation of abbre-viations for the names of polymers. An extended list of currently used abbreviations for polymers and polymeric materials is appended.


Jarm V.,Rudolfa Bicanica 18
Kemija u industriji/Journal of Chemists and Chemical Engineers | Year: 2011

The use of abbreviations for the names of polymers is practical and economic in written and spoken language. Taking into consideration the several hundreds of polymers appearing in literature annually, some of them having complicated structures, it is almost impossible to derive a systematic and unique abbreviation to polymer structures. Therefore, IUPAC has taken over the well-established ISO list of abbreviated terms (about 120 items) mainly selected on the basis of the scale of production. The presented ISO nomenclature is not necessarily in accord with IUPAC recommendations.


Jarm V.,Rudolfa Bicanica 18
Kemija u industriji/Journal of Chemists and Chemical Engineers | Year: 2011

Presented is a condensed review of the current state of polymer nomenclature according to IUPAC recommendations. Two nomenclature systems, the source-based and the structurebased, differ on the viewpoint of how the structure of a polymer is represented and named. In the simpler and traditionally more popular source-based nomenclature, a polymer is named by attaching the prefix "poly" to the name of the starting monomer, e.g. polystyrene. This system suffers from the lack of clear definitions or rules. The more complex structure-based system consists of naming a polymer as poly(constitutional repeating unit), e.g. poly(1-phenyletane-1,2-diil). However, for the identification, orientation and naming of the preferred constitutional repeating unit, a number of principles and rules, according to the IUPAC recommended nomenclature of organic compounds, should be known and used. Application of both systems to certain polymer structures and their illustration with numerous examples are described.

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