Florianópolis, Brazil
Florianópolis, Brazil

Time filter

Source Type

Echegaray F.,Rua Felix Kleis
Journal of Cleaner Production | Year: 2015

Political consumerism is increasingly acknowledged as a form of citizen participation and also as a set of behaviors instrumental to the accomplishment of sustainable consumption goals. However, scholarly research has overlooked occurrences in developing societies and tended to overemphasize cultural explanations, anchored in post-materialist values and the effects of sub-politics, as a catalyst for political consumerism. We offer an alternative interpretation, arguing that corporations invoke consumers' sense of shared responsibility for realizing public goods in order to mobilize consumers to engage in boycotting and buycotting behaviors. Using a representative sample of adults living in urban areas of Brazil, bivariate and multivariate analyses are performed to test the relative weight of these different explanations. The breadth of favorable attitudes towards corporate social responsibility and their stronger correlation with political-consumption behaviors suggest that citizens from low-income democracies strongly rely on cues related to corporate-citizenship activism for achieving political goals at the marketplace. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Echegaray F.,Rua Felix Kleis
Journal of Cleaner Production | Year: 2015

Product obsolescence represents a major challenge for sustainability. Deliberate curtailment of product lifespan and the symbolic devaluation of devices appear especially acute in the electronics segment, thus pushing up e-waste volumes. However, consumer reactions to these processes as well as their own enactment of psychological obsolescence remain understudied. Based on a representative urban sample survey of 806 Brazilians, this paper discusses the dissonance between consumers' product longevity experience, orientations to replace devices before terminal technical failure, and perceptions of industry responsibility and performance. Results indicate an experience of shortened product lifespan over time, which trails expectations of product longevity, although this fails to fuel consumer dissatisfaction. Technical failure is far surpassed by subjective obsolescence as a motive for rapid product replacement. While individuals acknowledge corporations' role in contrived product replacement, they do not seem to condemn this behavior. We conclude that Brazilians naturalize obsolescence by adjusting downwardly their product lifespan management behaviors. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Echegaray F.,Rua Felix Kleis
Journal of Cleaner Production | Year: 2014

Successful development of renewable energy technologies like solar photovoltaic energy (SPV) critically relies on its understanding and acceptance by consumers and institutional customers. Even in contexts of favorable support at the general level like in Brazil, their implementation faces multiple challenges, including low awareness, misperceptions, insufficient communication, and eco-labels' mixed record as information enhancing tools. This paper discusses how market research has been instrumental in developing the first SPV venture in Brazil, by identifying public's beliefs and level of support for alternative energies, and by testing reactions to a solar energy eco-label scheme proposed as key communication tool. The study indicates that expectations for return on investment are affected by a sustainability penalty, as well as by price and adaptation barriers. It also reveals an assessment gap between the concept and design of eco-label, which led to a new eco-label design capable of better addressing unfavorable beliefs, integrating expectations, and improving overall acceptance. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Loading Rua Felix Kleis collaborators
Loading Rua Felix Kleis collaborators