Royal United Bath Hospital

Bath, United Kingdom

Royal United Bath Hospital

Bath, United Kingdom
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Buchanan M.A.,Lister Hospital | Ewart S.,Lister Hospital | Mochloulis G.,Lister Hospital | Frosh A.C.,Royal United Bath Hospital
Journal of Laryngology and Otology | Year: 2013

Objective: To determine whether there is a change in the epidemiology of nasal fractures in females in the UK, and the potential contribution of the 'ladette' culture. Methods: This paper reports a multi-centre retrospective study. Operating theatre data for all females who underwent manipulation of nasal fractures under anaesthesia between 2002 and 2009 were analysed. In addition, the case notes of all females presenting with nasal fractures over a five-year period (2004-2009) were retrospectively reviewed and the cited cause of the fracture was noted. Results: From 2002 to 2009, there was an 825 per cent increase in nasal fractures in women aged 13-20 years. Almost one-quarter of all nasal fractures in one centre was attributed to non-domestic violence. The highest incidence of nasal fractures (67 per cent) was amongst white British females. Conclusion: There is an increasing trend in the number of women sustaining nasal fractures in the UK. The cause may be multi-factorial, but could be partially attributed to a rise in ladette culture. Further research on the role of alcohol consumption in this phenomenon is needed. Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2013Â.


McVeigh K.,Royal United Bath Hospital | McVeigh K.,Royal Infirmary | Spiteri Cornish K.,Royal Infirmary | Reddy A.R.,Royal Infirmary | And 2 more authors.
Clinical Ophthalmology | Year: 2013

Purpose: To report a case of retained Descemet's membrane following penetrating keratoplasty in a patient suffering from Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy. The use of confocal microscopy, histopathological tissue analysis, and treatment options are discussed. Methods: Case report of an 85-year-old man with a past ophthalmic history of atrophic macular degeneration, underwent a penetrating keratoplasty for Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy. Postoperative review revealed a retained retrocorneal membrane within the anterior chamber. Further surgery was performed to excise the membrane, with a subjective and objective postoperative improvement in visual acuity and without subsequent complications of the corneal graft. Results: Histopathological assessment confirmed the clinical suspicion of a retained Descemet's membrane, marrying with the initial histology from the corneal button excised during the penetrating keratoplasty, which showed only a very thin Descemet's layer. Conclusion: Retention of the Descemet's membrane following penetrating keratoplasty is a rare but potential complication of this surgery, particularly in cases of Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy due to the thickened and abnormal histological nature of the endothelium and high index of suspicion is required. © 2013 McVeigh et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.


Bogod D.,University of Nottingham | Yentis S.M.,Chelsea and Westminster Hospital | Mihai R.,John Radcliffe Hospital | Scott S.,John Radcliffe Hospital | Cook T.M.,Royal United Bath Hospital
Anaesthesia | Year: 2010

We analysed 366 claims related to regional anaesthesia and analgesia from the 841 anaesthesia-related claims handled by the National Health Service Litigation Authority between 1995 and 2007. The majority of claims (281/366, 77%) were closed at the time of analysis. The total cost of closed claims was £12 724 017 (34% of the cost of the anaesthesia dataset) with a median (IQR [range]) of £4772 (£0-28 907 [£0-2 070 092]). Approximately half of the claims (186/366; 51%) were related to obstetric anaesthesia and analgesia and of the non-obstetric claims, the majority (148/180; 82%) were related to neuraxial block. The total cost for obstetric closed claims was £5 433 920 (median (IQR [range]) £5678 (£0-27 690 [£0-1 597 565]) while that for non-obstetric closed claims was £7 290 097 (£3337 (£0-31 405 [£0-2 070 062]). Non-obstetric claims were more likely to relate to severe outcomes than obstetric ones. The maximum values of claims were higher for claims related to neuraxial blocks and eye blocks than for peripheral nerve blocks. Despite many limitations, including lack of clinical detail for each case, the dataset provides a useful overview of the extent, patterns and cost associated with the claims. © 2010 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.


Hooper C.E.,University of Bristol | Hooper C.E.,Southmead Hospital | Lyburn I.D.,Cobalt Health | Searle J.,Cobalt Health | And 18 more authors.
British Journal of Cancer | Year: 2015

Background: Robust markers that predict prognosis and detect early treatment response in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) would enhance patient care. Methods: Consecutive patients with MPM who were considered fit for first-line chemotherapy were prospectively recruited. Patients of similar performance status opting for best supportive care were included as a comparator group. Baseline and interval CT, PET-CT and serum markers (mesothelin, fibulin-3 and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR)) were obtained, and patients followed up for a minimum 12 months. Findings: Seventy-three patients were recruited (58 chemotherapy/15 comparator arm). Baseline TGV (total glycolytic volume on PET-CT) was an independent predictor of worse overall survival (OS) (P=0.001). Change in interval TGV(baseline/after two cycles of chemotherapy) did not predict OS or chemotherapy response on CT. Baseline NLR<4 was an independent predictor of better OS (median survival 453 (IQR 272-576) days vs NLR≥4, 257 (IQR 147-490), P=0.002). Although baseline serum mesothelin did not predict OS, a falling level at 8 weeks significantly predicted longer time to progression (TTP) (P<0.001). Interpretation: Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio and baseline TGV predict prognosis in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), but PET-CT is unhelpful in monitoring chemotherapy response. Serum mesothelin is a useful early treatment response marker when measured serially during chemotherapy and may have a role in evaluating patients' treatment response. © 2015 Cancer Research UK. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Cheltenham General Hospital, Great Western Hospital, Royal United Bath Hospital, Southmead Hospital and 7 more.
Type: Clinical Trial | Journal: British journal of cancer | Year: 2015

Robust markers that predict prognosis and detect early treatment response in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) would enhance patient care.Consecutive patients with MPM who were considered fit for first-line chemotherapy were prospectively recruited. Patients of similar performance status opting for best supportive care were included as a comparator group. Baseline and interval CT, PET-CT and serum markers (mesothelin, fibulin-3 and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR)) were obtained, and patients followed up for a minimum 12 months.Seventy-three patients were recruited (58 chemotherapy/15 comparator arm). Baseline TGV (total glycolytic volume on PET-CT) was an independent predictor of worse overall survival (OS) (P=0.001). Change in interval TGV(baseline/after two cycles of chemotherapy) did not predict OS or chemotherapy response on CT. Baseline NLR<4 was an independent predictor of better OS (median survival 453 (IQR 272-576) days vs NLR4, 257 (IQR 147-490), P=0.002). Although baseline serum mesothelin did not predict OS, a falling level at 8 weeks significantly predicted longer time to progression (TTP) (P<0.001).Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio and baseline TGV predict prognosis in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), but PET-CT is unhelpful in monitoring chemotherapy response. Serum mesothelin is a useful early treatment response marker when measured serially during chemotherapy and may have a role in evaluating patients treatment response.


Cook T.M.,Royal United Bath Hospital | Scott S.,Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals | Mihai R.,Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals
Anaesthesia | Year: 2010

Claims notified to the NHS Litigation Authority in England between 1995 and 2007 and filed under anaesthesia were analysed to explore patterns of injury and cost related to airway or respiratory events. Of 841 interpretable claims the final dataset contained 96 claims of dental damage, 67 airway-related claims and 24 respiratory claims. Claims of dental damage contributed a numerically important (11%), but financially modest (0.5%) proportion of claims. These claims predominantly described injury during tracheal intubation or extubation; a minority associated with electroconvulsive therapy led to substantial cost per claim. The total cost of (non-dental) airway claims was £4.9 million (84% closed, median cost £30 000) and that of respiratory claims was £3.3 million (81% closed, median £27 000). Airway and respiratory claims account for 12% of anaesthesia-related claims, 53% of deaths, 27% of cost and ten of the 50 most expensive claims in the dataset. Airway claims most frequently described events at induction of anaesthesia, involved airway management with a tracheal tube and typically led to hypoxia and patient death or brain injury. Airway trauma accounted for one third of airway claims and these included deaths from mediastinal injury at intubation. Pulmonary aspiration and tube misplacement, including oesophageal intubation, led to several claims. Among respiratory claims, ventilation problems, combined with hypoxia, were an important source of claims. Although limited clinical details hamper analysis, the data suggest that most airway and respiratory-related claims arise from sentinel events. The absence of clinical detail and denominators limit opportunities to learn from such events; much more could be learnt from a closed claim or sentinel event analysis scheme. © 2010 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.


Howes B.W.,Royal United Bath Hospital | Repanos C.,Royal United Bath Hospital
Journal of Laryngology and Otology | Year: 2010

Image capture systems that display and record endoscopic images are important for documentation and teaching. We have modified a universal serial bus microscope to couple with most clinical endoscopes used in our practice. This very economical device produces images suitable for teaching, and potentially for clinical use. The implications of this could be significant for teaching, patient education, documentation and the developing world. © JLO (1984) Limited 2009.


PubMed | Royal United Bath Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of laryngology and otology | Year: 2010

Image capture systems that display and record endoscopic images are important for documentation and teaching. We have modified a universal serial bus microscope to couple with most clinical endoscopes used in our practice. This very economical device produces images suitable for teaching, and potentially for clinical use. The implications of this could be significant for teaching, patient education, documentation and the developing world.


PubMed | Royal United Bath Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Anaesthesia | Year: 2010

Claims notified to the NHS Litigation Authority in England between 1995 and 2007 and filed under anaesthesia were analysed to explore patterns of injury and cost related to airway or respiratory events. Of 841 interpretable claims the final dataset contained 96 claims of dental damage, 67 airway-related claims and 24 respiratory claims. Claims of dental damage contributed a numerically important (11%), but financially modest (0.5%) proportion of claims. These claims predominantly described injury during tracheal intubation or extubation; a minority associated with electroconvulsive therapy led to substantial cost per claim. The total cost of (non-dental) airway claims was 4.9 million pounds (84% closed, median cost 30,000 pounds) and that of respiratory claims was 3.3 million pounds (81% closed, median 27,000 pounds). Airway and respiratory claims account for 12% of anaesthesia-related claims, 53% of deaths, 27% of cost and ten of the 50 most expensive claims in the dataset. Airway claims most frequently described events at induction of anaesthesia, involved airway management with a tracheal tube and typically led to hypoxia and patient death or brain injury. Airway trauma accounted for one third of airway claims and these included deaths from mediastinal injury at intubation. Pulmonary aspiration and tube misplacement, including oesophageal intubation, led to several claims. Among respiratory claims, ventilation problems, combined with hypoxia, were an important source of claims. Although limited clinical details hamper analysis, the data suggest that most airway and respiratory-related claims arise from sentinel events. The absence of clinical detail and denominators limit opportunities to learn from such events; much more could be learnt from a closed claim or sentinel event analysis scheme.

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