Royal Society of Chemistry

Wake Forest, NC, United States

Royal Society of Chemistry

Wake Forest, NC, United States

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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Rice University chemist Gustavo Scuseria won the 2017 Royal Society of Chemistry S F Boys - A Rahman Award. This biennial award from the London-based international organization for chemical scientists recognizes outstanding innovative research in the area of computational chemistry, including both quantum chemistry and molecular simulations. Scuseria will complete a lecture tour in the U.K. to share his research. "I am deeply honored to receive this award, whose previous winners are founding figures in electronic structure theory and quantum chemistry," said Scuseria, the Robert A. Welch Professor of Chemistry. "I look forward to sharing exciting new results about our quest for solving the strong correlation problem during my U.K. university tour." Scuseria, who is also a professor of physics and astronomy and of materials science and nanoengineering, focuses on work that straddles the interface of quantum chemistry, condensed matter physics and materials science and, ultimately, the development of important materials for energy and the environment. Scuseria's list of honors includes the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, a Creativity Extension Award from the National Science Foundation, an IBM Partnership Award, the Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology Theory, a Humboldt Research Award, a Lisa Meitner Minerva Lectureship from Israel and a Distinguished Israel Pollak Lecturer from the Technion. Born and raised in San Fernando, Buenos Aires, Scuseria has been a Rice faculty member since 1989. He is co-editor of the Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation and serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany, and the Scientific Advisory Board on the Many Electrons Initiative of the Simons Foundation in New York. He is vice president of the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science and a fellow of the American Chemical Society, the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Guggenheim Foundation and the Royal Society of Chemistry. The Royal Society of Chemistry, which has more than 54,000 members and a heritage that spans 175 years, advances excellence in the chemical sciences. It recognizes achievements by individuals, teams and organizations in advancing the chemical discipline. Fifty previous winners of Royal Society of Chemistry awards have gone on to win Nobel Prizes for their work. This release can be found online at news.rice.edu. Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation's top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,879 undergraduates and 2,861 graduate students, Rice's undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for happiest students and for lots of race/class interaction by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger's Personal Finance. To read "What they're saying about Rice," go to http://tinyurl. .


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

LA JOLLA, CA - May 9, 2017 - Three chemists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI)--Dale Boger, Jin-Quan Yu and Phil Baran--have received awards from the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), a renowned professional organization for chemists based in the United Kingdom, with more than 54,000 members worldwide. Dale Boger, co-chair of the Department of Chemistry at TSRI, was awarded the 2017 Robert Robinson Award of the RSC's Organic Division. The award honors his groundbreaking studies in natural product synthesis, which could lead to new therapeutic treatments for challenging clinical needs. "I am very honored and humbled to receive the RSC Robert Robinson Award, which has such a distinguished list of prior award winners," Boger said. Jin-Quan Yu, Frank and Bertha Hupp Professor of Chemistry at TSRI, received the 2017 Pedler Award from the RSC's Organic Division in recognition of his development of pioneering methods of C-H activation, a technique in chemistry that can lead to new pharmaceuticals and other natural products. "I hope these new reactions will accelerate the discovery and synthesis of useful molecules, especially medicines," said Yu, who received his Ph.D. in the U.K. at the University of Cambridge and served as a Royal Society fellow. "It gives me a warm feeling to be recognized by the U.K. scientific community that I was part of for 10 years." Phil Baran, the Darlene Shiley Professor of Chemistry at TSRI, received the RSC's 2017 Merck, Sharp & Dohme Award, which honors contributions to any area of organic chemistry from a researcher under the age of 45. Baran's work focuses on developing new chemical reactions and methodologies for more efficient and economically viable routes in drug design. Baran credited his lab members for his success so far. "This award is a recognition of the students and postdoctoral scholars who work tirelessly to invent useful chemistry," Baran said. In addition to £2,000 and a medal, all three awards include a lecture tour in the U.K. The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) is one of the world's largest independent, not-for-profit organizations focusing on research in the biomedical sciences. TSRI is internationally recognized for its contributions to science and health, including its role in laying the foundation for new treatments for cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, hemophilia, and other diseases. An institution that evolved from the Scripps Metabolic Clinic founded by philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps in 1924, the institute now employs more than 2,500 people on its campuses in La Jolla, CA, and Jupiter, FL, where its renowned scientists -- including two Nobel laureates and 20 members of the National Academies of Science, Engineering or Medicine -- work toward their next discoveries. The institute's graduate program, which awards PhD degrees in biology and chemistry, ranks among the top ten of its kind in the nation. In October 2016, TSRI announced a strategic affiliation with the California Institute for Biomedical Research (Calibr), representing a renewed commitment to the discovery and development of new medicines to address unmet medical needs. For more information, see http://www. .


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Researchers at the University of Southern Denmark, the Polytechnic University of Valencia and the Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials & Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN) in Spain have discovered a new technique to detect ecstasy that is extremely reliable and simple to use. According to the researchers, many of the testing methods used today often require advanced instruments that are expensive and/or only found in laboratories. Often, there is also a waiting time in connection with the test results. Furthermore, there is also the recurring issue that many methods trigger a false positive a little too often - i.e. showing that a person tested positive for ecstasy even though subsequent tests show otherwise. "It is our impression that a need exists for more reliable, user-friendly and cheaper tests. What makes our method stand out is that it can detect even small traces," said Jan O. Jeppesen, a chemistry professor at the University of Southern Denmark. His research colleagues, Ramón Martínez-Máñez and Félix Sancenón from the Polytechnic Univeristy of Valencia and the CIBER-BBN in Spain, also noted that their method had several advantages. "We have discovered that a certain molecular activity can detect even very small traces of the active compound in ecstasy, MDMA, with almost 100 percent certainty. This knowledge can be used to develop cheap testing kits that are easy to transport and not least use." The researchers’ new method can detect a solution equivalent to 1 gram of MDMA in 1000 liters of water. They have recently published their findings and method in the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Chemical Communications. Jeppesen and his research team at the Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy at the University of Southern Denmark are working on understanding and building parts for molecular machines - near-unimaginably tiny machines propelled by the movement of molecules. It was during this work that they discovered the molecules’ ability to detect MDMA. It is a research area that is attracting a great deal of attention from all over the world, and the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to the chemists Jean-Pierre Sauvage, J. Fraser Stoddart and Bernard L. Feringa for their work on building machines on a molecular level. The opportunities that lie in the field of molecular machines are huge, according to Jeppesen. "The moment you let a molecular machine replace an electric machine, for example, you end up with a much smaller piece of machinery to operate. As a way of illustrating this, consider the following: If we assume that 6 billion people on Earth each possesses 10 computers in one shape or another, those computers will take up an enormous amount of space. If we could instead use molecules to replace all this computer technology, the molecular technology would only take up half a gram of weight." You start with a ball composed of atoms, which is simple to make. The ball is porous and filled with holes, meaning it can be filled up with smaller molecules. In this method, the ball is filled with molecules that are designed to light up if they are released from the holes. If there is no MDMA (methylenedioxymethamphetamine, the active ingredient in ecstasy) within range, the molecules cannot leave the ball. This is because a kind of arm is installed on the exterior of the ball that can open the ball’s pores once it comes into contact with MDMA and keeps the molecules sealed in until that happens. When the ball ‘opens up,’ so to speak, the luminescent molecules stream out and can be detected by a sensor. The ball only opens up once it comes into contact with MDMA, and it can detect even minuscule concentrations of MDMA.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Researchers at the University of Southern Denmark, the Polytechnic University of Valencia and the Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials & Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN) in Spain have discovered a new technique to detect ecstasy that is extremely reliable and simple to use. According to the researchers, many of the testing methods used today often require advanced instruments that are expensive and/or only found in laboratories. Often, there is also a waiting time in connection with the test results. Furthermore, there is also the recurring issue that many methods trigger a false positive a little too often - i.e. showing that a person tested positive for ecstasy even though subsequent tests show otherwise. "It is our impression that a need exists for more reliable, user-friendly and cheaper tests. What makes our method stand out is that it can detect even small traces," said Jan O. Jeppesen, a chemistry professor at the University of Southern Denmark. His research colleagues, Ramón Martínez-Máñez and Félix Sancenón from the Polytechnic Univeristy of Valencia and the CIBER-BBN in Spain, also noted that their method had several advantages. "We have discovered that a certain molecular activity can detect even very small traces of the active compound in ecstasy, MDMA, with almost 100 percent certainty. This knowledge can be used to develop cheap testing kits that are easy to transport and not least use." The researchers’ new method can detect a solution equivalent to 1 gram of MDMA in 1000 liters of water. They have recently published their findings and method in the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Chemical Communications. Jeppesen and his research team at the Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy at the University of Southern Denmark are working on understanding and building parts for molecular machines - near-unimaginably tiny machines propelled by the movement of molecules. It was during this work that they discovered the molecules’ ability to detect MDMA. It is a research area that is attracting a great deal of attention from all over the world, and the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to the chemists Jean-Pierre Sauvage, J. Fraser Stoddart and Bernard L. Feringa for their work on building machines on a molecular level. The opportunities that lie in the field of molecular machines are huge, according to Jeppesen. "The moment you let a molecular machine replace an electric machine, for example, you end up with a much smaller piece of machinery to operate. As a way of illustrating this, consider the following: If we assume that 6 billion people on Earth each possesses 10 computers in one shape or another, those computers will take up an enormous amount of space. If we could instead use molecules to replace all this computer technology, the molecular technology would only take up half a gram of weight." You start with a ball composed of atoms, which is simple to make. The ball is porous and filled with holes, meaning it can be filled up with smaller molecules. In this method, the ball is filled with molecules that are designed to light up if they are released from the holes. If there is no MDMA (methylenedioxymethamphetamine, the active ingredient in ecstasy) within range, the molecules cannot leave the ball. This is because a kind of arm is installed on the exterior of the ball that can open the ball’s pores once it comes into contact with MDMA and keeps the molecules sealed in until that happens. When the ball ‘opens up,’ so to speak, the luminescent molecules stream out and can be detected by a sensor. The ball only opens up once it comes into contact with MDMA, and it can detect even minuscule concentrations of MDMA.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLLEGE STATION -- Waste material from the paper and pulp industry soon could be made into anything from tennis rackets to cars. "We have overcome one of the industry's most challenging issues by discovering how to make good quality carbon fiber from waste," said Dr. Joshua Yuan, Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientist and associate professor of plant pathology and microbiology in College Station. The research was published recently in Green Chemistry, the peer-reviewed journal of the Royal Society of Chemistry. "People have been thinking about using lignin to make carbon fiber for many years, but achieving good quality has been an issue," Yuan said. About 50 million tons of lignin -- or structural part of a plant -- piles up each year as waste from the U.S. paper and pulping industry, he said. Additional lignin could come from biorefineries that use plants to produce ethanol, yielding another 100 million to 200 million tons of lignin waste each year. Yet only about 2 percent of the lignin waste is currently recycled into new products, Yuan said. "Lignin is considered as one of the most abundant biopolymers in the world," he said. "All this waste accumulates, and it will be great to use it for something." Yuan's research team has had several successes in making fuel and bioproducts from lignin. But even the biofuel making process leaves a large stockpile of waste. That led them to consider the possibility of making carbon fiber material. Carbon fiber is not a new concept. It has been toyed with since 1860 -- mostly for light bulbs originally -- and is known for high strength, low weight and heat tolerance. But it has been expensive to produce by traditional means. "If you cannot produce quality carbon material, it's really not useful," Yuan said. So the team examined lignin more closely. "What we found is that lignin is a mixture of many molecules of many sizes and different chemical properties. Through fractionation, we separated lignin into different parts, and then we found that certain parts of lignin are very good for high quality carbon fiber manufacturing," he explained. The researcher noted that lignin is a complex molecule, but when the high-density, high molecular weight portion is separated from the rest, it has a uniform structure that allows the formation of high quality carbon fiber. "We are still improving and fine-tuning the quality, but eventually this carbon fiber could be used for windmills, sport materials and even bicycles and cars," he said. "Carbon fiber is much lighter but has the same mechanical strength as other materials used for those products now. This material can be used for a lot of different applications. "The beauty of this technology is that it allows us to use lignin completely. Basically what we do is fractionate lignin so that the high molecular weight fraction can be used for carbon fiber and the low molecular weight fraction can be used use for bioplastics and products like asphalt binder modifier used on roads." Yuan envisions a multi-stream integrated biorefinery in which lignin is separated in one location so that a variety of materials -- the high density carbon fibers and the low density bioplastics, along with biofuels from plant feedstock like grasses -- could be made at one facility. "When we are able to use the same biomass to produce different things, that allows the best economic return by being sustainable," he said. "Eventually that would lead to increasing jobs and enhancing rural economic growth. "And the entire supply chain is in the United States, which means the jobs would be here. The biomass is grown, harvested and transported here. It would be difficult to ever ship that much waste to another country for production. It all stays here," Yuan said. "It would put agriculture production and industry together in a bioeconomy making renewable products." His research is supported with a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technology Office.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

The Company's geologists concluded that the drilling does not add to the project's open-pit mineral resources. GoviEx's CEO, Daniel Major, said, "The latest drilling results will not add to our near-surface resource. Based on all the Miriam drilling results to date, the Company remains confident of the prospective nature of the Madaouela Project and will continue to target further project optimization opportunities."(1) Based on the GoviEx's 2015 Integrated Development Plan, the fully-permitted Madaouela Project represents a proposed base case envisioning a 2.69 Mlb per year U3O8 yellowcake production rate over an 18-year mine life, and a total production of 45.6 Mlb U3O8, with forecasted cash operating costs of US $24.49/lb U3O8, excluding royalties. (1) The Company remains focused on implementing its integrated four-step strategy to advance the Madaouela Project towards a production decision. The strategy includes: 1. Debt finance structuring, including engagement of various export credit agencies; 2. Project optimization and completion of detailed engineering; 3. Off-take structuring; and 4. Project equity financing. Further updates on each of the steps will be provided as new information become available. (1) An independent NI 43-101 technical report was prepared for the Madaouela Project in 2015 to a pre-feasibility level of confidence. The report, titled "An Updated Integrated Development Plan for the Madaouela Project, Niger," has an effective date of August 11, 2015, and a revision date of August 20, 2015, and is available at GoviEx's profile on SEDAR at www.sedar.com. The scientific and technical information disclosed in this release has been reviewed, verified and approved by Dr. Rob Bowell, a chartered chemist of the Royal Society of Chemistry, a chartered geologist of the Geological Society of London and Fellow of the Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Materials, who is an independent Qualified Person under the terms of National Instrument 43-101 for uranium deposits. GoviEx is a mineral resource company focused on the exploration and development of uranium properties. GoviEx's principal objective is to become a significant uranium producer through the continued exploration and development of its mine-permitted Madaouela Project in Niger, and its other uranium properties in Africa. This press release may contain forward-looking information within the meaning of applicable securities laws. All information and statements other than statements of current or historical facts contained in this press release are forward-looking information. Forward-looking statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties concerning the specific factors disclosed here and elsewhere in GoviEx's periodic filings with Canadian securities regulators. When used in this news release, words such as "will," "could," "plan," "estimate," "expect," "intend," "may," "potential," "should," and similar expressions, are forward-looking statements. Information provided in this document is necessarily summarized and may not contain all available material information. Forward-looking statements include, without limitation, statements regarding GoviEx continuing to target further project optimization opportunities at the Madaouela Project, statements regarding GoviEx implementing its integrated four-step strategy to advance the Madaouela Project towards a production decision, and other statements that are not facts. Forward-looking statements are based on a number of assumptions and estimates that, while considered reasonable by management based on the business and markets in which GoviEx operates, are inherently subject to significant operational, economic, and competitive uncertainties and contingencies. Assumptions upon which forward-looking statements have been made include that the Company will be able to identify and execute on further project optimization opportunities at the Madaouela Project and implement its integrated four-step strategy to advance the Madaouela Project towards a production decision. In addition, the factors described or referred to in the section entitled "Financial Risks and Management Objectives" in the MD&A for the year ended December 31, 2016, of GoviEx, which is available on the SEDAR website at www.sedar.com, should be reviewed in conjunction with the information found in this news release. GoviEx has attempted to identify important factors that could cause actual results, performance, or achievements to differ materially from those contained in the forward-looking statements, including the failure to identify and/or execute on further project optimization opportunities at the Madaouela Project or to meet the contemplated timelines for implementing GoviEx's integrated four-part strategy that is anticipated to allow GoviEx to be in a position to make a production decision, if any. There can be other factors that cause results, performance or achievements not to be as anticipated, estimated, or intended. There can be no assurance that such information will prove to be accurate or that management's expectations or estimates of future developments, circumstances, or results will materialize. As a result of these risks and uncertainties, the results or events predicted in these forward-looking statements may differ materially from actual results or events. Accordingly, readers should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements in this news release are made as of the date of this news release, and GoviEx disclaims any intention or obligation to update or revise such information, except as required by applicable law. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Waste material from the paper and pulp industry soon could be made into anything from tennis rackets to cars. "We have overcome one of the industry's most challenging issues by discovering how to make good quality carbon fiber from waste," said Dr. Joshua Yuan, Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientist and associate professor of plant pathology and microbiology in College Station. The research was published recently in Green Chemistry, the peer-reviewed journal of the Royal Society of Chemistry. "People have been thinking about using lignin to make carbon fiber for many years, but achieving good quality has been an issue," Yuan said. About 50 million tons of lignin -- or structural part of a plant -- piles up each year as waste from the U.S. paper and pulping industry, he said. Additional lignin could come from biorefineries that use plants to produce ethanol, yielding another 100 million to 200 million tons of lignin waste each year. Yet only about 2 percent of the lignin waste is currently recycled into new products, Yuan said. "Lignin is considered as one of the most abundant biopolymers in the world," he said. "All this waste accumulates, and it will be great to use it for something." Yuan's research team has had several successes in making fuel and bioproducts from lignin. But even the biofuel making process leaves a large stockpile of waste. That led them to consider the possibility of making carbon fiber material. Carbon fiber is not a new concept. It has been toyed with since 1860 -- mostly for light bulbs originally -- and is known for high strength, low weight and heat tolerance. But it has been expensive to produce by traditional means. "If you cannot produce quality carbon material, it's really not useful," Yuan said. So the team examined lignin more closely. "What we found is that lignin is a mixture of many molecules of many sizes and different chemical properties. Through fractionation, we separated lignin into different parts, and then we found that certain parts of lignin are very good for high quality carbon fiber manufacturing," he explained. The researcher noted that lignin is a complex molecule, but when the high-density, high molecular weight portion is separated from the rest, it has a uniform structure that allows the formation of high quality carbon fiber. "We are still improving and fine-tuning the quality, but eventually this carbon fiber could be used for windmills, sport materials and even bicycles and cars," he said. "Carbon fiber is much lighter but has the same mechanical strength as other materials used for those products now. This material can be used for a lot of different applications. "The beauty of this technology is that it allows us to use lignin completely. Basically what we do is fractionate lignin so that the high molecular weight fraction can be used for carbon fiber and the low molecular weight fraction can be used use for bioplastics and products like asphalt binder modifier used on roads." Yuan envisions a multi-stream integrated biorefinery in which lignin is separated in one location so that a variety of materials -- the high density carbon fibers and the low density bioplastics, along with biofuels from plant feedstock like grasses -- could be made at one facility. "When we are able to use the same biomass to produce different things, that allows the best economic return by being sustainable," he said. "Eventually that would lead to increasing jobs and enhancing rural economic growth. "And the entire supply chain is in the United States, which means the jobs would be here. The biomass is grown, harvested and transported here. It would be difficult to ever ship that much waste to another country for production. It all stays here," Yuan said. "It would put agriculture production and industry together in a bioeconomy making renewable products."


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: phys.org

"We have overcome one of the industry's most challenging issues by discovering how to make good quality carbon fiber from waste," said Dr. Joshua Yuan, Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientist and associate professor of plant pathology and microbiology in College Station. The research was published recently in Green Chemistry, the peer-reviewed journal of the Royal Society of Chemistry. "People have been thinking about using lignin to make carbon fiber for many years, but achieving good quality has been an issue," Yuan said. About 50 million tons of lignin—or structural part of a plant—piles up each year as waste from the U.S. paper and pulping industry, he said. Additional lignin could come from biorefineries that use plants to produce ethanol, yielding another 100 million to 200 million tons of lignin waste each year. Yet only about 2 percent of the lignin waste is currently recycled into new products, Yuan said. "Lignin is considered as one of the most abundant biopolymers in the world," he said. "All this waste accumulates, and it will be great to use it for something." Yuan's research team has had several successes in making fuel and bioproducts from lignin. But even the biofuel making process leaves a large stockpile of waste. That led them to consider the possibility of making carbon fiber material. Carbon fiber is not a new concept. It has been toyed with since 1860—mostly for light bulbs originally—and is known for high strength, low weight and heat tolerance. But it has been expensive to produce by traditional means. "If you cannot produce quality carbon material, it's really not useful," Yuan said. So the team examined lignin more closely. "What we found is that lignin is a mixture of many molecules of many sizes and different chemical properties. Through fractionation, we separated lignin into different parts, and then we found that certain parts of lignin are very good for high quality carbon fiber manufacturing," he explained. The researcher noted that lignin is a complex molecule, but when the high-density, high molecular weight portion is separated from the rest, it has a uniform structure that allows the formation of high quality carbon fiber. "We are still improving and fine-tuning the quality, but eventually this carbon fiber could be used for windmills, sport materials and even bicycles and cars," he said. "Carbon fiber is much lighter but has the same mechanical strength as other materials used for those products now. This material can be used for a lot of different applications. "The beauty of this technology is that it allows us to use lignin completely. Basically what we do is fractionate lignin so that the high molecular weight fraction can be used for carbon fiber and the low molecular weight fraction can be used use for bioplastics and products like asphalt binder modifier used on roads." Yuan envisions a multi-stream integrated biorefinery in which lignin is separated in one location so that a variety of materials—the high density carbon fibers and the low density bioplastics, along with biofuels from plant feedstock like grasses—could be made at one facility. "When we are able to use the same biomass to produce different things, that allows the best economic return by being sustainable," he said. "Eventually that would lead to increasing jobs and enhancing rural economic growth. "And the entire supply chain is in the United States, which means the jobs would be here. The biomass is grown, harvested and transported here. It would be difficult to ever ship that much waste to another country for production. It all stays here," Yuan said. "It would put agriculture production and industry together in a bioeconomy making renewable products." Explore further: Carbon fiber from wood is used to build car


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.accesswire.com

VANCOUVER, BC / ACCESSWIRE / May 18, 2017 / GoviEx Uranium Inc. (TSX-V: GXU) (OTC PINK: GVXXF) ("GoviEx" or "Company") announced today that it has completed the previously announced exploration drilling program adjacent to the Miriam Deposit at its Madaouela Uranium Project in Niger ("Madaouela Project"). The Company's geologists concluded that the drilling does not add to the project's open-pit mineral resources. GoviEx's CEO, Daniel Major, said, "The latest drilling results will not add to our near-surface resource. Based on all the Miriam drilling results to date, the Company remains confident of the prospective nature of the Madaouela Project and will continue to target further project optimization opportunities."(1) Based on the GoviEx's 2015 Integrated Development Plan, the fully-permitted Madaouela Project represents a proposed base case envisioning a 2.69 Mlb per year U O yellowcake production rate over an 18-year mine life, and a total production of 45.6 Mlb U O , with forecasted cash operating costs of US $24.49/lb U O , excluding royalties. (1) The Company remains focused on implementing its integrated four-step strategy to advance the Madaouela Project towards a production decision. The strategy includes: 1. Debt finance structuring, including engagement of various export credit agencies; 2. Project optimization and completion of detailed engineering; 3. Off-take structuring; and 4. Project equity financing. Further updates on each of the steps will be provided as new information become available. (1) An independent NI 43-101 technical report was prepared for the Madaouela Project in 2015 to a pre-feasibility level of confidence. The report, titled "An Updated Integrated Development Plan for the Madaouela Project, Niger," has an effective date of August 11, 2015, and a revision date of August 20, 2015, and is available at GoviEx's profile on SEDAR at www.sedar.com. The scientific and technical information disclosed in this release has been reviewed, verified and approved by Dr. Rob Bowell, a chartered chemist of the Royal Society of Chemistry, a chartered geologist of the Geological Society of London and Fellow of the Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Materials, who is an independent Qualified Person under the terms of National Instrument 43-101 for uranium deposits. GoviEx is a mineral resource company focused on the exploration and development of uranium properties. GoviEx's principal objective is to become a significant uranium producer through the continued exploration and development of its mine-permitted Madaouela Project in Niger, and its other uranium properties in Africa. This press release may contain forward-looking information within the meaning of applicable securities laws. All information and statements other than statements of current or historical facts contained in this press release are forward-looking information. Forward-looking statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties concerning the specific factors disclosed here and elsewhere in GoviEx's periodic filings with Canadian securities regulators. When used in this news release, words such as "will," "could," "plan," "estimate," "expect," "intend," "may," "potential," "should," and similar expressions, are forward-looking statements. Information provided in this document is necessarily summarized and may not contain all available material information. Forward-looking statements include, without limitation, statements regarding GoviEx continuing to target further project optimization opportunities at the Madaouela Project, statements regarding GoviEx implementing its integrated four-step strategy to advance the Madaouela Project towards a production decision, and other statements that are not facts. Forward-looking statements are based on a number of assumptions and estimates that, while considered reasonable by management based on the business and markets in which GoviEx operates, are inherently subject to significant operational, economic, and competitive uncertainties and contingencies. Assumptions upon which forward-looking statements have been made include that the Company will be able to identify and execute on further project optimization opportunities at the Madaouela Project and implement its integrated four-step strategy to advance the Madaouela Project towards a production decision. In addition, the factors described or referred to in the section entitled "Financial Risks and Management Objectives" in the MD&A for the year ended December 31, 2016, of GoviEx, which is available on the SEDAR website at www.sedar.com, should be reviewed in conjunction with the information found in this news release. GoviEx has attempted to identify important factors that could cause actual results, performance, or achievements to differ materially from those contained in the forward-looking statements, including the failure to identify and/or execute on further project optimization opportunities at the Madaouela Project or to meet the contemplated timelines for implementing GoviEx's integrated four-part strategy that is anticipated to allow GoviEx to be in a position to make a production decision, if any. There can be other factors that cause results, performance or achievements not to be as anticipated, estimated, or intended. There can be no assurance that such information will prove to be accurate or that management's expectations or estimates of future developments, circumstances, or results will materialize. As a result of these risks and uncertainties, the results or events predicted in these forward-looking statements may differ materially from actual results or events. Accordingly, readers should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements in this news release are made as of the date of this news release, and GoviEx disclaims any intention or obligation to update or revise such information, except as required by applicable law. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Training Grant | Award Amount: 4.52M | Year: 2014

Moores Law states that the number of active components on an microchip doubles every 18 months. Variants of this Law can be applied to many measures of computer performance, such as memory and hard disk capacity, and to reductions in the cost of computations. Remarkably, Moores Law has applied for over 50 years during which time computer speeds have increased by a factor of more than 1 billion! This remarkable rise of computational power has affected all of our lives in profound ways, through the widespread usage of computers, the internet and portable electronic devices, such as smartphones and tablets. Unfortunately, Moores Law is not a fundamental law of nature, and sustaining this extraordinary rate of progress requires continuous hard work and investment in new technologies most of which relate to advances in our understanding and ability to control the properties of materials. Computer software plays an important role in enhancing computational performance and in many cases it has been found that for every factor of 10 increase in computational performance achieved by faster hardware, improved software has further increased computational performance by a factor of 100. Furthermore, improved software is also essential for extending the range of physical properties and processes which can be studied computationally. Our EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Computational Methods for Materials Science aims to provide training in numerical methods and modern software development techniques so that the students in the CDT are capable of developing innovative new software which can be used, for instance, to help design new materials and understand the complex processes that occur in materials. The UK, and in particular Cambridge, has been a pioneer in both software and hardware since the earliest programmable computers, and through this strategic investment we aim to ensure that this lead is sustained well into the future.

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