Whistler, Canada

Royal Roads University

www.royalroads.ca
Whistler, Canada

Royal Roads University is a public university located in Colwood, British Columbia. Wikipedia.

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VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA--(Marketwired - May 1, 2017) - StrikePoint Gold Inc. (TSX VENTURE:SKP)(OTCQX:STKXF) ("StrikePoint" or the Company) Shawn Khunkhun, CEO of StrikePoint, stated: "It is with great enthusiasm that I welcome Michael McPhie to the Board of Directors of StrikePoint Gold. Mr. McPhie epitomizes the consummate mining executive; making our team much stronger and validating our advancement in the Yukon." In a career spanning more than 20 years Michael has worked throughout Canada and globally as an executive in the mining and minerals industry and is a specialist in regulatory and permitting issues and project development and financing. In addition to serving as Executive Chairman of IDM Mining Ltd., a company he founded with his partner Rob McLeod who serves as CEO, Michael is the Founder and CEO of Falkirk Resource Consultants Ltd. and Managing Director of JDS Gold Ltd. Michael was CEO of Curis Resources Ltd., a copper development company that was taken over in 2014. Michael also served as a Director and Executive Vice President of Exeter Resource Corporation, CEO of the Mining Association of British Columbia (MABC) and a Policy Director with Canada's Department of Natural Resources. Michael is the recent past Chair of the Board of the Association for Mineral Exploration BC (AMEBC) and the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) and a current board member of the MABC. Michael earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Simon Fraser University, a Masters of Science degree from Royal Roads University and is a registered Qualified Environmental Professional (QEP). He is a strong advocate for responsible development, sustainability and good practice in the mining business globally. ON BEHALF OF THE BOARD of STRIKEPOINT GOLD INC. Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Strong customer growth with 75,000 new postpaid wireless, Internet and TELUS TV client additions, more than double from last year Industry-leading consolidated revenue and EBITDA growth of 2.9 per cent and 6.4 per cent respectively Wireless network revenue and EBITDA growth of 6.4 per cent and 7.4 per cent respectively; Best-in-class wireline EBITDA growth of 4.7 per cent Industry-leading wireless postpaid churn of 0.93 per cent combined with strong ARPU growth of 3.9 per cent, yields best-in-class lifetime revenue per client of $5,550 Updated industry-leading 2017 targets reflect higher revenue and EBITDA of up to 4 per cent and 7 per cent respectively Industry-best dividend increase of 7.1 per cent to $0.4925 cents per share; 13th dividend increase since 2011 TELUS Corporation's consolidated operating revenue increased 2.9 per cent to $3.2 billion in the first quarter of 2017, over the same period a year ago, reflecting higher revenue from data services and subscriber growth in both wireless and wireline operations. Earnings before interest, income taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) increased by 11 per cent to $1.3 billion. When excluding restructuring and other costs, adjusted EBITDA was up 6.4 per cent to $1.3 billion. This growth reflects higher revenue growth, as well as ongoing execution of operational efficiency and effectiveness initiatives. "TELUS continued to demonstrate the quality and effectiveness of the company's long-term strategy in the first quarter by delivering industry-leading revenue and EBITDA growth in conjunction with the best customer loyalty in our industry," said Darren Entwistle, President and CEO. "Through the consistency of our strong results owing to our skilled team's dedicated execution of our strategy, we are increasing our industry-leading 2017 financial targets to reflect additional revenue and EBITDA growth opportunities, including those associated with the acquisition of MTS customers. Moreover, we are once again raising our quarterly dividend by 7.1 per cent, commensurate with our dividend growth model that is underpinned by our strong financial and operational results." Mr. Entwistle added, "Our dividend increase reflects the thirteenth increase since 2011, and is the first of our new three year program that will target annual dividend growth between seven and 10 per cent from 2017 through to 2019. Our track record of delivering on our industry-leading shareholder-friendly initiatives continues to generate significant value for our shareholders. Notably, TELUS has now returned over $14 billion to shareholders, including $9 billion in dividends, representing $24 per share since 2004." Doug French, Executive Vice-President and CFO said, "TELUS' results for the first quarter of 2017 demonstrate our team's ability to successfully execute our national growth strategy by making smart, generational investments that further advance our network leadership and support continued profitable customer growth. Those investments coupled with our keen focus on effectiveness and efficiency initiatives are clearly paying off as evidenced by our strong first quarter results. This consistent execution gives us the confidence to deliver on our strategy while balancing our commitments to TELUS stakeholders." In wireless, network revenue growth was driven by a 12 per cent increase in data revenue, reflecting a larger proportion of higher-rate two-year plans in the revenue mix, including Premium Plus plans, increased adoption of larger data buckets or topping up of data buckets, continued subscriber growth, a more favourable postpaid subscriber mix, and higher data-related roaming revenues. In wireline, data services and equipment revenue growth of 4.2 per cent was generated by increased Internet and enhanced data service revenues from continued high-speed Internet subscriber growth and higher revenue per customer, growth in business process outsourcing revenues, an increase in TELUS TV revenues from subscriber growth and higher TELUS Health revenues. In the quarter, TELUS attracted 75,000 new wireless postpaid, high-speed Internet and TV customers, up 44,000 over the same quarter a year ago. The higher net additions included 44,000 wireless postpaid customers, 24,000 high-speed Internet subscribers, and 7,000 TELUS TV customers. TELUS' total wireless subscriber base of 8.6 million is up 2.3 per cent from a year ago, reflecting a 3.8 per cent increase in the postpaid subscriber base to 7.6 million. TELUS' high-speed Internet connections have increased 5.4 per cent to 1.7 million, while TELUS TV subscribers are higher by 5.3 per cent to 1.1 million. TELUS' continued focus on putting customers first, which has been underway since 2008, continued to deliver an industry-leading wireless monthly postpaid churn rate of 0.93 per cent. TELUS' postpaid churn rate has now been below 1 per cent for 14 of the past 15 quarters. For the quarter, net income of $441 million and basic earnings per share (EPS) of $0.73 increased by 17 per cent and 14 per cent respectively reflecting EBITDA growth, partially offset by higher depreciation and amortization expenses. When excluding restructuring and other costs and unfavourable income tax-related adjustments adjusted net income and adjusted basic EPS increased by 5.6 per cent and 5.7 per cent respectively. Free cash flow of $217 million in the first quarter doubled from $108 million a year ago due to lower cash taxes paid and higher EBITDA, partially offset by an increase in capital expenditures. TELUS' consolidated financial targets for 2017, including revenue, EBITDA excluding restructuring and other costs and basic earnings per share, are being updated now that TELUS and Bell have formally closed their deal to have approximately 100,000 Bell MTS postpaid wireless customers and 15 dealer locations acquired by TELUS. TELUS is also raising its consolidated capital expenditure target to reflect the ongoing fibre-optic network rollout and to support increased wireless network investments in Manitoba. The investments will support ongoing profitable customer growth and support TELUS' small-cell technology strategy to improve coverage and prepare for a more efficient and timely evolution to 5G. The preceding disclosure respecting TELUS' 2017 financial targets contains forward-looking information and is fully qualified by the 'Caution regarding forward-looking statements' at the beginning of the accompanying Management's discussion and analysis for the first quarter of 2017 and in the 2016 annual Management's discussion and analysis, especially Section 10 entitled 'Risks and Risk Management' thereof which is hereby incorporated by reference, and is based on management's expectations and assumptions as set out in Section 9 of the 2016 annual Management's discussion and analysis entitled 'General trends, outlook and assumptions'. This disclosure updates Section 1.7 entitled 'Financial and operating targets for 2017' of TELUS' fourth quarter 2016 results and 2017 financial target news release dated February 9, 2017. Kathy Kinloch and Claude Mongeau to join TELUS Board of Directors TELUS is pleased to announce Kathy Kinloch and Claude Mongeau as new nominees to our Board of Directors, to be elected at the TELUS Annual General Meeting held on May 11. Kathy currently serves as the President of the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT), a position she has held since January 2014. Previously, Kathy has held several leadership positions, including President of Vancouver Community College from 2010 to 2013 and Dean of Health Sciences at BCIT from 2007 to 2010. Kathy was also Senior Advisor to the Ministry of Health for the B.C. government from 2006 to 2007, the Chief Operating Officer of the Fraser Health Authority from 2002 to 2006, and a Vice-President at Surrey Memorial Hospital from 1981 to 2002. Kathy holds a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Alberta and a Master of Arts in Leadership from Royal Roads University. Claude Mongeau served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Canadian National Railway Company (CN) from 2010 to 2016. During his 22-year career at CN, he also served as Executive Vice-President and Chief Financial Officer from 2000 to 2009, Senior Vice-President and Chief Financial Officer from 1999 to 2000, Vice-President, Strategic and Financial Planning from 1995 to 1999, and Assistant Vice-President, Corporate Development from 1994 to 1995. Claude holds a Bachelor in Psychology from the University of Quebec and an MBA from McGill University. Micheline Bouchard, who has been a TELUS director since 2004, is retiring today from our Board of Directors. We thank Micheline for her many contributions to TELUS, including her service as a member of the Audit, Human Resources and Compensation, and Pension committees. The TELUS Board of Directors has declared a quarterly dividend of $0.4925 Canadian per share on the issued and outstanding Common Shares of the Company payable on July 4, 2017 to holders of record at the close of business on June 9, 2017. This second quarter dividend represents a 7.1 per cent increase from the $0.46 quarterly dividend paid on July 4, 2016 and is the thirteenth dividend increase since TELUS announced its original multi-year dividend growth program in May 2011. Over this period, TELUS' dividend is higher by 88 per cent. TELUS makes significant contributions and investments in the communities where team members live, work and serve and to the Canadian economy on behalf of customers, shareholders and team members. These include: TELUS (TSX:T)(NYSE:TU) is Canada's fastest-growing national telecommunications company, with $12.9 billion of annual revenue and 12.7 million subscriber connections, including 8.6 million wireless subscribers, 1.7 million high-speed Internet subscribers, 1.4 million residential network access lines and 1.1 million TELUS TV customers. TELUS provides a wide range of communications products and services, including wireless, data, Internet protocol (IP), voice, television, entertainment and video. TELUS is also Canada's largest healthcare IT provider, and TELUS International delivers business process solutions around the globe. In support of our philosophy to give where we live, TELUS, our team members and retirees have contributed over $482 million to charitable and not-for-profit organizations and volunteered more than 7.7 million hours of service to local communities since 2000. Created in 2005 by President and CEO Darren Entwistle, TELUS' 12 Canadian community boards and 5 International boards have led the Company's support of grassroots charities and have contributed more than $60 million in support of 5,595 local charitable projects, enriching the lives of more than 2 million children and youth, annually. TELUS was honoured to be named the most outstanding philanthropic corporation globally for 2010 by the Association of Fundraising Professionals, becoming the first Canadian company to receive this prestigious international recognition. For more information about TELUS, please visit telus.com. Interested investors, the media and others may review this quarterly earnings news release, management's discussion and analysis, quarterly results slides, audio and transcript of the investor webcast call, supplementary financial information, and our full 2016 annual report at telus.com/investors. TELUS' first quarter 2017 conference call is scheduled for Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 12:30pm ET (9:30am PT) and will feature a presentation followed by a question and answer period with investment analysts. Interested parties can access the webcast at telus.com/investors. A telephone playback will be available on May 11 until June 15, 2017 at 1-855-201-2300. Please use reference number 1216329# and access code 77377#. An archive of the webcast will also be available at telus.com/investors and a transcript will be posted on the website within a few business days. This document contains forward-looking statements about expected events and the financial and operating performance of TELUS Corporation. The terms TELUS, the Company, we, us and our refer to TELUS Corporation and, where the context of the narrative permits or requires, its subsidiaries. Forward-looking statements include any statements that do not refer to historical facts. They include, but are not limited to, statements relating to our objectives and our strategies to achieve those objectives, our targets, outlook, updates, our multi-year dividend growth program, and our multi-year share purchase program. Forward-looking statements are typically identified by the words assumption, goal, guidance, objective, outlook, strategy, target and other similar expressions, or future or conditional verbs such as aim, anticipate, believe, could, expect, intend, may, plan, predict, seek, should, strive and will. By their nature, forward-looking statements are subject to inherent risks and uncertainties and are based on assumptions, including assumptions about future economic conditions and courses of action. These assumptions may ultimately prove to have been inaccurate and, as a result, our actual results or events may differ materially from our expectations expressed in or implied by the forward-looking statements. An update to our assumptions for 2017 is presented in Section 9 Update to assumptions in this Management's discussion and analysis (MD&A). Risks and uncertainties that could cause actual performance or events to differ materially from the forward-looking statements made herein and in other TELUS filings include, but are not limited to, the following: These risks are described in additional detail in Section 9 General trends, outlook and assumptions and Section 10 Risks and risk management in our 2016 annual MD&A. That description is incorporated by reference in this cautionary statement but is not intended to be a complete list of the risks that could affect the Company. Many of these factors are beyond our control or our current expectations or knowledge. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem to be immaterial may also have a material adverse effect on our financial position, financial performance, cash flows, business or reputation. Except as otherwise indicated in this document, the forward-looking statements made herein do not reflect the potential impact of any non-recurring or special items or any mergers, acquisitions, dispositions or other business combinations or transactions that may be announced or that may occur after the date of this document. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements in this document describe our expectations and are based on our assumptions as at the date of this document and are subject to change after this date. Except as required by law, we disclaim any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements. This cautionary statement qualifies all of the forward-looking statements in this document. The forward-looking statements in this section, including estimates regarding economic growth, are qualified by the Caution regarding forward-looking statements at the beginning of this Management's discussion and analysis (MD&A). The following sections are a discussion of the consolidated financial position and financial performance of TELUS for the three-month period ended March 31, 2017, and should be read together with TELUS' March 31, 2017, condensed interim consolidated financial statements (subsequently referred to as the interim consolidated financial statements). The generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) we use are the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB). Our interim consolidated financial statements comply with IFRS-IASB and Canadian GAAP and have been prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard 34, Interim Financial Reporting. Our use of the term IFRS in this MD&A is a reference to these standards. In our discussion, we also use certain non-GAAP financial measures to evaluate our performance, monitor compliance with debt covenants and manage our capital structure. These measures are defined, qualified and reconciled with their nearest GAAP measures in Section 11.1. All currency amounts are in Canadian dollars, unless otherwise specified. Additional information relating to the Company, including our annual information form and other filings with securities commissions or similar regulatory authorities in Canada, is available on SEDAR (sedar.com). Our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission in the United States, including Form 40-F, are available on EDGAR (sec.gov). Our disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance that all relevant information is gathered and reported to senior management on a timely basis, so that appropriate decisions can be made regarding public disclosure. This MD&A and the interim consolidated financial statements were reviewed by our Audit Committee and approved by our Board of Directors (our Board) for issuance on May 11, 2017. In this MD&A, unless otherwise indicated, results for the first quarter of 2017 (three-month period ended March 31, 2017) are compared with results from the first quarter of 2016 (three-month period ended March 31, 2016). 1.2 The environment in which we operate The success of our business and the challenges we face can best be understood with reference to the environment in which we operate, including broader economic factors that affect our customers and us, and the competitive industry in which we operate. Our estimates regarding our environment also form an important part of the assumptions on which our targets are based. We currently estimate that the annual rate of economic growth in Canada in 2017 will be 2.2%, based on a composite of estimates from Canadian banks and other sources. For our incumbent local exchange carrier (ILEC) provinces in Western Canada, we currently estimate that annual rates of economic growth in British Columbia (B.C.) will be 2.3% in 2017 and in Alberta will be 2.4% in 2017. The Bank of Canada's April 2017 Monetary Policy Report estimated annual economic growth in Canada will be 2.6% in 2017. In respect of the national unemployment rate, Statistics Canada's Labour Force Survey reported a rate of 6.7% for March 2017 (6.9% for December 2016 and 7.1% for March 2016). The unemployment rate for B.C. was 5.4% for March 2017 (5.8% for December 2016 and 6.5% for March 2016), while the unemployment rate for Alberta was 8.4% for March 2017 (8.5% in December 2016 and 7.1% for March 2016). Agreement with BCE Inc. regarding Manitoba Telecom Services Inc. In May 2016, the Company announced an agreement with BCE Inc. (BCE), pursuant to which it would acquire a portion of Manitoba Telecom Services Inc.'s (MTS) postpaid wireless subscribers and dealer locations in Manitoba, dependent on the successful completion of BCE's acquisition of MTS and subject to regulatory approvals. On March 17, 2017, BCE completed its transaction with MTS. The transaction with TELUS closed on April 1, 2017, and customers will be actively migrated to TELUS over several months in a customer-friendly manner. We acquired approximately one-quarter of MTS' postpaid wireless subscribers, certain network assets and rights to 15 MTS retail locations in Manitoba for cash consideration of approximately $300 million; our total price of the transaction with BCE will vary depending upon the actual number of qualifying postpaid wireless subscribers who migrate from MTS. On March 6, 2017, we issued U.S.$500 million of senior unsecured notes with a 10.5-year maturity at 3.70% and $325 million of senior unsecured notes with a 31-year maturity at 4.70%. The proceeds were used to fund the repayment, on maturity, of $700 million of the principal amount outstanding on TELUS' Series CD Notes due March 2017, to repay a portion of outstanding commercial paper and for general corporate purposes. For the U.S. issuance, we have fully hedged the principal and interest obligations of the notes against fluctuations in the Canadian dollar foreign exchange rate for the entire term of the notes by entering into foreign exchange derivatives (cross currency interest rate exchange agreements) that effectively converted the principal payments and interest obligations to Canadian dollar obligations with an effective fixed interest rate of 3.41% and an effective issued and outstanding amount of $667 million (reflecting a fixed exchange rate of $1.3348). Our average term to maturity of long-term debt (excluding commercial paper and the revolving component of the TELUS International (Cda.) Inc. (TELUS International) credit facility) has increased to approximately 11.3 years at March 31, 2017, from approximately 10.4 years at December 31, 2016. Our weighted average interest rate on long-term debt (excluding commercial paper and the revolving component of the TELUS International credit facility) decreased to 4.16% at March 31, 2017, as compared to 4.22% at December 31, 2016 and 4.32% at March 31, 2016. Our core business was described in our 2016 annual MD&A. The following are business updates grouped under the applicable strategic imperatives. Focusing relentlessly on growth markets of data, IP and wireless External wireless revenues and wireline data revenues totalled $2.8 billion in 2017, up $123 million or 4.6%, while remaining revenues totalled $380 million in 2017, down $33 million or 8.0%. Combined wireless revenues and wireline data revenues represented 88% of our consolidated revenues for 2017, as compared to 87% in the same period in 2016. Providing integrated solutions that differentiate TELUS from our competitors In March 2017, TELUS Health's Med Access electronic medical record (EMR) solution, versions 4.9 and 5.0, successfully achieved Canada Health Infoway's EMR national class recertification. Med Access is a web-based, configurable EMR solution that adapts to individual clinic and user preferences and can be implemented in a clinical practice. It was originally certified in August 2012 and continues to conform to national and international standards for privacy, security and interoperability. Through our TELUS Mobility for Good pilot program, we are working with the Government of B.C.'s Ministry of Children and Family Development to support young adults transitioning from foster care into independent living by providing these youth with a smartphone and subsidized TELUS Mobility rate plan. The pilot program will start in B.C. and expand to Ontario later in 2017. TELUS Mobility for Good builds on our TELUS Internet for Good program introduced in the fourth quarter of 2016, which provides low-income, single parents on income or disability assistance with TELUS-subsidized home Internet service and access to a low-cost computer and free digital literacy training including TELUS WISE. During the quarter, we announced $250 million and $55 million fibre-optic investments in the cities of Surrey, B.C. and Chilliwack, B.C., respectively, to connect more than 90% of homes and businesses to the TELUS PureFibre ™ network before the end of 2018. Additionally, we announced a $150 million investment to connect the TELUS PureFibre network to the city of Burnaby, B.C. before the end of 2019 and announced a $12 million investment to connect the network to the city of Kitimat, B.C. before the end of 2017. Subsequent to March 31, 2017, we announced fibre-optic investments in the province of Quebec including $80 million in the Quebec City region, $30 million in the Lower St-Lawrence region, $30 million in the Gaspe Peninsula and $15 million in the North Shore region. Partnering, acquiring and divesting to accelerate the implementation of our strategy and focus our resources on core business As discussed in Section 1.3, BCE has divested approximately one-quarter of MTS' postpaid wireless subscribers, certain network assets and 15 MTS retail locations to TELUS. We look forward to actively migrating these subscribers and dealers to TELUS over several months in a customer-friendly manner. Additionally, we expanded and enhanced our network in Manitoba as described in Section 7.3. We also officially launched our TELUS Manitoba Community Board as described within the following strategic imperative. TELUS Health and Groupe DOmedic, Inc., have announced a partnership to provide better health monitoring and medication management for seniors. xPill PHARMA, offered by DOmedic to retirement homes and connected by TELUS Health to pharmacists through TELUS Health's pharmacy management solution, is an integrated medication management platform technology allowing a continuous, real-time flow of information between retirement homes and Canadian pharmacists to enable an optimized administering and dispensing medication cycle. Going to market as one team under a common brand, executing a single strategy In February 2017, we officially launched our TELUS Manitoba Community Board which will provide $500,000 in funding to local charities each year focused on improving the lives of youth and families, concentrating on projects in health, education, and the environment. This contribution is part of TELUS' total $1 million commitment in 2017 for community investment in Manitoba. Our team works together to implement our top corporate priority: putting customers first, as we strive to consistently deliver exceptional client experiences and become the most recommended company in the markets we serve. In April 2017, the Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services (CCTS) issued its mid-year report and TELUS continued to receive the fewest customer complaints of the national carriers while Koodo continued to receive the fewest customer complaints of the national flanker brands. TELUS, Koodo and Public Mobile received 7.0%, 2.9% and 1.4% of total customer complaints accepted by the CCTS, respectively, or 11.3% of total customer complaints, in aggregate, when we have approximately 28.0% of Canadian wireless customers. Our 2017 corporate priorities are provided in the table below. The forward-looking statements in this section, including statements regarding our dividend growth program and our financial objectives in Section 4.3, are qualified by the Caution regarding forward-looking statements at the beginning of this MD&A. For a discussion of our principal markets and an overview of competition, please refer to Section 4.1 of our 2016 annual MD&A. For a discussion of our operational resources, please refer to Section 4.2 of our 2016 annual MD&A. In the first quarter of 2017, we continued to deliver leading blended customer churn on a national basis. Our monthly postpaid churn rate was 0.93% in the first quarter of 2017 and has now been below 1% for 14 of the past 15 quarters despite strong competitive and economic pressures and higher churn from our CDMA customers as we approach the national shutdown date in the second quarter of 2017. Our monthly blended churn, defined in Section 11.2, was 1.18% in the first quarter of 2017, which represented our lowest first quarter churn rate since we became a national carrier 17 years ago. This further exemplifies the success of our differentiated customers first culture, our ongoing focus on delivering an outstanding customer experience, combined with attractive new products and services, and our retention programs. Since mid-2013, we have invested more than $3.6 billion to acquire wireless spectrum licences in spectrum auctions and other transactions, which has more than doubled our national spectrum holdings in support of our top corporate priority of putting customers first. Wireless data consumption has been increasing rapidly and we have responded by investing to extend the capacity of our network to support the additional data consumption and growth in our wireless customer base. As at March 31, 2017, our 4G long-term evolution (LTE) network covered 98% of Canada's population, up from nearly 97% at March 31, 2016. Furthermore, we have continued to invest in our LTE advanced network roll-out, which covered more than 80% of Canada's population at March 31, 2017. Outside of LTE advanced and LTE coverage areas, and for voice services, the LTE devices we offer also operate on our HSPA+ network, which covered 99% of Canada's population at March 31, 2017. We have continued to invest in urban and rural communities with commitments to deliver broadband network capabilities to as many Canadians as possible. We are expanding our fibre footprint by connecting more homes and businesses directly to fibre. Throughout 2016 and 2017, we have made announcements regarding investments to bring our fibre-optic network to cities across B.C., Alberta and Eastern Quebec. We have also increased broadband Internet speeds, expanded our IP TV video-on-demand library and high-definition content, including 4K TV, and enhanced marketing of data products and bundles. As at March 31, 2017, our high-speed broadband coverage reached approximately 3 million households and businesses in B.C., Alberta and Eastern Quebec, including approximately 1.15 million homes and businesses covered by fibre-optic cable, up from 0.75 million homes and businesses in the first quarter of 2016, which provides these premises with immediate access to our gigabit-capable fibre-optic network. Our objective when managing capital is to maintain a flexible capital structure that optimizes the cost and availability of capital at acceptable risk. In the management of capital and in its definition, we include Common Share equity (excluding Accumulated other comprehensive income), Long-term debt (including long-term credit facilities, commercial paper backstopped by long-term credit facilities and any associated hedging assets or liabilities, net of amounts recognized in Accumulated other comprehensive income), Cash and temporary investments, and securitized trade receivables. We manage our capital structure and make adjustments to it in light of changes in economic conditions and the risk characteristics of our telecommunications infrastructure. In order to maintain or adjust our capital structure, we may change the amount of dividends paid to holders of Common Shares, purchase shares for cancellation pursuant to our normal course issuer bid (NCIB) programs, issue new debt, issue new debt to replace existing debt with different characteristics, issue new shares, and/or increase or decrease the amount of trade receivables sold to an arm's-length securitization trust. We monitor capital by utilizing a number of measures, including net debt to EBITDA - excluding restructuring and other costs ratio and the dividend payout ratio. (See definitions in Section 11.1.) 4.4 Changes in internal control over financial reporting There were no changes in internal control over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting. This section contains forward-looking statements, including those with respect to our deployment of wireless spectrum licences, average revenue per subscriber unit per month (ARPU) growth, wireless retention spending, high-speed Internet subscriber growth, cash tax payments and restructuring and other costs trends as they relate to the future. There can be no assurance that we have accurately identified the trends based on past results or that these trends will continue. See Caution regarding forward-looking statements at the beginning of this MD&A. Our operating segments and reportable segments are wireless and wireline. Segmented information in Note 5 of the interim consolidated financial statements is regularly reported to our Chief Executive Officer (CEO) (the chief operating decision-maker). 5.2 Summary of consolidated quarterly results and trends The consolidated revenue trend reflects year-over-year increases in: (i) wireless network revenue generated from growth in both our ARPU and subscriber base; and (ii) wireline data service revenue, driven by Internet and enhanced data, business process outsourcing, TELUS TV services and TELUS Health revenues. Increased Internet and TV service revenues are being generated by subscriber growth. Consolidated revenue growth was partially offset by the continued decline in wireline voice revenues and the decline in wireless equipment revenues. For additional information on wireless and wireline revenue and subscriber trends, see Section 5.4 Wireless segment and Section 5.5 Wireline segment. The general trend in Goods and services purchased expense reflects increasing equipment expenses associated with higher-value smartphones in the sales mix and increased handset costs (which includes the effect of the decline in the Canadian dollar exchange rate compared to the U.S. dollar); increasing wireless customer service, administrative, external labour and distribution channel expenses to support growth in our subscriber base; and increased wireline TV costs of sales associated with a growing subscriber base. These were partly offset by lower wireline equipment costs. The general trend in Employee benefits expense reflects moderating wages and salaries resulting from a decrease in the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) domestic employees and the impact of the immediately vesting transformative compensation described in our 2016 annual MD&A, partly offset by increases in TELUS International compensation and in the number of TELUS International employees to support increased business process outsourcing revenue growth. The general trend in Depreciation and amortization historically reflected increases due to the impact of our continuing program of asset life studies and growth in capital assets supporting the expansion of our broadband footprint and enhanced long-term evolution (LTE) network coverage. The investments in our fibre-optic network also support our small-cell technology strategy to improve coverage and prepare for a more efficient and timely evolution to 5G. The general trend in Financing costs reflects an increase in long-term debt outstanding, mainly associated with significant investments in wireless spectrum licences acquired during wireless spectrum licence auctions in 2014 and 2015 and our generational investments in fibre to homes and businesses. However, Financing costs are net of capitalized interest related to spectrum licences acquired during the wireless spectrum licence auctions and capitalization of interest has ceased in the first quarter of 2017, as cell sites are now capable of being built to utilize those spectrum frequencies. Financing costs also include the Employee defined benefit plans net interest expense. Additionally for the eight periods shown, Financing costs included varying amounts of foreign exchange gains or losses and varying amounts of interest income, including $20 million of interest income in the second quarter of 2015 resulting from the settlement of prior years' income tax-related matters. The trend in Net income reflects the items noted above, as well as non-cash adjustments arising from legislated income tax changes and adjustments recognized in the current periods for income tax of prior periods, including any related after-tax interest on reassessments. Historically, the trend in basic EPS was also impacted by share purchases under our normal course issuer bid (NCIB) programs. The trend in Cash provided by operating activities reflects generally higher consolidated Adjusted EBITDA offset by increased interest payments. Both income tax payments and restructuring and other costs have generally increased in 2016 but we have assumed that cash tax payments will decrease in fiscal 2017, as described in Section 9.3 of our 2016 annual MD&A. The trend in free cash flow reflects the factors affecting Cash provided by operating activities, as well as increases in capital expenditures. For further discussion on trends, see Section 5.4 Wireless segment and Section 5.5 Wireline segment. The following is a discussion of our consolidated financial performance. Segment information in Note 5 of the interim consolidated financial statements is regularly reported to our CEO. We discuss the performance of our segments in Section 5.4 Wireless segment, Section 5.5 Wireline segment and Section 7.3 Cash used by investing activities. Financing costs increased by $15 million in 2017, mainly due to the following factors: Total income tax expense increased by $11 million in 2017, primarily due to higher Income before income taxes, partly offset by reductions in foreign income taxes. Comprehensive income increased by $214 million in 2017, primarily due to changes in employee defined benefit plan re-measurement amounts and higher Net income. Items that may be subsequently reclassified to income are composed of changes in the unrealized fair value of derivatives designated as cash flow hedges, foreign currency translation adjustments arising from translating financial statements of foreign operations, and changes in the unrealized fair value of available-for-sale investments. The historical trend in wireless network revenue reflects growth in both ARPU and subscriber base. This growth, coupled with higher-value smartphones in the sales mix, was partially offset by the decline in wireless equipment revenues, reflecting higher per-unit subsidies and lower retention volumes. Retention volumes declined due to the effects on contract renewals of higher handset prices (including the effect of higher handset acquisition costs due to depreciation of the Canadian dollar relative to the U.S. dollar over the last two years and a shorter renewal cycle from the impact of two-year rate plans), and an increasing number of customers choosing to stay on month-to-month service. The wireless ARPU growth trend increased in 2017 due to a higher mix of data share plans and an emphasis on the marketing and increased mix of higher-rate plans, including the new Premium Plus plans launched in June 2016. This was partly offset by competitive pressures driving larger allotments of data provided in rate plans, including data sharing and international data roaming features and plans, consumer response to increased frequency of customer data usage notifications and offloading of data traffic to increasingly available Wi-Fi hotspots. ARPU is expected to continue to increase modestly throughout 2017, as a result of the continued growth in data usage and the ongoing shift in our subscriber base towards higher-value postpaid customers. However, the level of ARPU is highly dependent on competition, the economic environment, consumer behaviour, the regulatory environment, device selection and other factors, and, as a consequence, there cannot be assurance that ARPU growth will continue to materialize. We may experience pressure on our postpaid subscriber churn if competitive intensity continues, in part due to an increase in customers on expired contracts, as well as customers bringing their own devices and therefore not entering into new contracts. Accordingly, our wireless segment historical operating results and trends may not be reflective of results and trends for future periods. Historically, there have been significant third and fourth quarter seasonal effects reflected in higher wireless subscriber additions, an increase in related acquisition costs and equipment sales, and higher retention costs due to contract renewals in those quarters. These impacts can be more pronounced around popular device launches and seasonal events such as back to school, Black Friday and Christmas. The costs associated with higher seasonal loading volumes have typically resulted in sequential decreases in wireless EBITDA from the second quarter through to the fourth quarter, typically followed by sequential increases in wireless EBITDA from the fourth quarter through to the second quarter. Subscriber additions have generally been lowest in the first quarter. Historically, wireless ARPU has experienced seasonal sequential increases in the second and third quarters, reflecting higher levels of usage and roaming in the spring and summer, followed by seasonal sequential declines in the fourth and first quarters. This seasonal effect on ARPU has moderated, as unlimited nationwide voice plans have become more prevalent and chargeable voice and long distance spikes become less pronounced. In addition, customers are opting for higher-capacity data plans resulting in less variability in chargeable data usage. The trends in revenue and revenue-based operating metrics will be impacted by our adoption of IFRS 15, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, as discussed further in Section 8.2 Accounting policy developments of our 2016 annual MD&A. Network revenue from external customers increased $100 million in the first quarter of 2017. Data network revenue increased by 12.2% in 2017, reflecting: (i) a larger proportion of higher-rate plans in the revenue mix, including the Premium Plus plans launched in June 2016; (ii) a larger proportion of customers selecting plans with larger data buckets or periodically topping up their data buckets; (iii) growth in the subscriber base; (iv) a higher postpaid subscriber mix; and (v) higher data-related roaming revenues. Voice network revenue decreased by 1.2% in 2017 due to the increased adoption of unlimited nationwide voice plans and continued but moderating substitution to data services and lower voice-related roaming revenues, partly offset by growth in the subscriber base. Equipment and other service revenues decreased by $16 million in 2017, mainly from a combination of higher per-unit subsidies, lower retention volumes and competitive intensity, partly offset by increased postpaid gross additions. Other operating income decreased by $3 million in 2017, mainly due to lower gains from sales of property, plant and equipment. Intersegment revenue represents network services that are eliminated upon consolidation along with the associated wireline expenses. Equipment sales expenses increased by $3 million in 2017, reflecting an increase in higher-value smartphones in the sales mix, including premium devices on Premium Plus plans, increasing handset costs (including the effect of higher supplier costs due to depreciation of the Canadian dollar relative to the U.S. dollar over the last two years) and increased postpaid gross additions, partly offset by lower retention volumes. Network operating expenses increased by $11 million in 2017, mainly due to increased roaming rates. Marketing expenses declined by $5 million in 2017, primarily due to lower advertising and promotions expenses. Other goods and services purchased increased by $15 million in 2017, primarily due to an increase in external labour and higher administrative costs supporting the higher customer base, and higher non-labour restructuring and other costs. Employee benefits expense decreased by $10 million in 2017, primarily due to the non-recurrence of significant labour-related restructuring costs from efficiency initiatives in 2016, lower compensation and benefits costs resulting from a decrease in the number of domestic FTE employees and higher capitalized labour costs. Wireless EBITDA increased by $64 million in 2017. Wireless Adjusted EBITDA increased by $56 million in 2017, reflecting network revenue growth driven by higher ARPU and a larger customer base and lower employee benefits expense, partly offset by increased network operating, external labour and administrative expenses. The trend of increasing wireline data service revenue reflects growth in high-speed Internet and enhanced data services, business process outsourcing services, TELUS TV revenues and TELUS Health revenues, and is partly offset by declining wireline voice revenues and equipment revenues. The increases in Internet and TV service revenues are being generated by subscriber growth and higher Internet revenue per customer. The trend of declining wireline voice revenues is due to technological substitution, greater use of inclusive long distance and lower wholesale volumes competition from voice over IP (VoIP) service providers (including cable-TV competitors), resellers and facilities-based competitors, as well as technological substitution to wireless and IP-based services and applications, continuing increased competition in the small and medium-sized business market, and the lingering impacts of the economic slowdown, particularly in Alberta, which remain more prominent in the business markets. We expect continued high-speed Internet subscriber base growth in 2017, as the economy recovers and as we continue our investments in expanding our fibre-optic network. The TELUS TV subscriber base growth has moderated due to a declining overall market for paid TV services resulting from the high rate of market penetration and increased competition, including from over-the-top (OTT) services. Residential network access line (NAL) losses continue to reflect the ongoing trend of substitution to wireless and Internet-based services. Other operating income increased by $4 million in 2017, mainly due to the non-recurrence of a provision related to written put options in respect of non-controlling interests in 2016, and gains on the sale of investments, partly offset by a decrease in amounts recognized from the regulatory price cap deferral account for provisioning broadband Internet services to eligible rural and remote communities. Intersegment revenue represents services provided to the wireless segment. Such revenue is eliminated upon consolidation together with the associated expenses in wireless. Total wireline operating expenses decreased by $43 million in 2017, primarily due to the following factors: Goods and services purchased decreased by $9 million in 2017, due to cost management and lower product costs related to decreases in data equipment revenues, partly offset by higher TV content costs which were driven by higher TV subscribers. Employee benefits expense decreased by $34 million in 2017, primarily due to the non-recurrence of significant labour-related restructuring costs from efficiency initiatives in 2016, lower compensation and benefits costs resulting from a decrease in the number of domestic FTE employees and higher capitalized labour costs, partly offset by an increase in TELUS International employees supporting growing business process outsourcing revenue. Wireline EBITDA increased by $57 million in 2017. Wireline Adjusted EBITDA increased by $21 million in 2017, due to growth in data service margins, including Internet, TELUS TV, TELUS Health services and business process outsourcing services, our execution of cost efficiency programs, partly offset by continued declines in legacy voice services. 6. Changes in financial position This section contains forward-looking statements, including those with respect to our dividend payout ratio and net debt to EBITDA - excluding restructuring and other costs ratio. See Caution regarding forward-looking statements at the beginning of this MD&A. Our capital structure financial policies and financing and capital structure management plans are described in Section 4.3. Cash provided by operating activities increased year over year by $146 million. Wireless segment capital expenditures increased by $69 million in 2017 due to continuing investments in our fibre-optic network to support our small-cell technology strategy to improve coverage and prepare for a more efficient and timely evolution to 5G. We also expanded our investment in Manitoba to improve coverage, capacity and speeds to significantly enhance our customer experience and supplement the business acquisition of MTS subscribers, dealers and network. Additionally, we continued to invest in system and network resiliency and reliability in support of our ongoing customers first initiatives and to ready the network and systems for future retirement of legacy assets. Wireline segment capital expenditures increased by $37 million in 2017 due to continuing investments in our broadband infrastructure, including connecting more homes and businesses directly to our fibre-optic network. This investment supports our high-speed Internet and Optik TV subscriber growth, as well as our customers' demand for faster Internet speeds, and extends the reach and functionality of our business and healthcare solutions. Dividends paid to the holders of Common Shares The increase in dividends paid to the holders of Common Shares reflects higher dividend rates under our dividend growth program (see Section 4.3). Subsequent to March 31, 2017, we paid dividends of $283 million to the holders of Common Shares in April 2017. Included in this amount is approximately $15 million or 350,000 Common Shares issued from treasury. No discount was applicable. Short-term borrowings are composed primarily of amounts advanced to us from an arm's-length securitization trust pursuant to the transfer of receivables securitization transactions (see Section 7.7 Sale of trade receivables). Such proceeds were $100 million at March 31, 2017, unchanged since March 31, 2016. For the first quarter of 2017, long-term debt issues, net of repayments, were $769 million, primarily composed of: In comparison, long-term debt issues, net of repayments were $675 million in 2016, primarily composed of: The average term to maturity of our long-term debt (excluding commercial paper and the revolving component of the TELUS International credit facility) increased to approximately 11.3 years at March 31, 2017, compared to approximately 10.8 years at March 31, 2016. Additionally, our weighted average cost of long-term debt was 4.16% at March 31, 2017, as compared to 4.22% at December 31, 2016 and 4.32% at March 31, 2016. Net debt was $13.1 billion at March 31, 2017, an increase of $0.7 billion when compared to one year earlier, resulting mainly from the issuances of the U.S.$500 million of senior unsecured notes and the $325 million of senior unsecured notes, as described in Section 7.4. Fixed-rate debt as a proportion of total indebtedness was 89% as at March 31, 2017, down from 92% one year earlier, mainly due to amounts drawn on the TELUS International credit facility and an increase in issued commercial paper. Net debt to EBITDA - excluding restructuring and other costs ratio was 2.73 times, as measured at March 31, 2017, down slightly from 2.74 one year earlier. Our long-term objective for this measure is within a range of 2.00 to 2.50 times, which we believe is consistent with maintaining investment grade credit ratings in the range of BBB+, or the equivalent and providing reasonable access to capital. As at March 31, 2017, this ratio remains outside of the long-term objective range due to prior issuance of incremental debt primarily for the acquisition in 2014 and 2015 of spectrum licences for approximately $3.6 billion, which were auctioned in unprecedented amounts and in atypical concentrations during those years, partially offset by growth in EBITDA - excluding restructuring and other costs. These acquired licences have more than doubled our national spectrum holdings and represent an investment to extend our network capacity to support continuing data consumption growth, as well as growth in our wireless customer base. We will endeavour to return this ratio to within the objective range in the medium term, as we believe that this range is supportive of our long-term strategy. While this ratio exceeds our long-term objective range, we are well in compliance with the leverage ratio covenant in our credit facilities, which states that we may not permit our net debt to operating cash flow ratio to exceed 4.00:1.00 (see Section 7.6 Credit facilities). Earnings coverage ratio for the 12-month period ended March 31, 2017, was 4.1 times, down from 4.6 times one year earlier. A decrease in income before borrowing costs and income taxes reduced the ratio by 0.3, while an increase in borrowing costs reduced the ratio by 0.2. EBITDA - excluding restructuring and other costs interest coverage ratio for the 12-month period March 31, 2017, was 8.5 times, down from 9.2 times one year earlier. An increase in net interest costs reduced the ratio by 1.2, while growth in EBITDA - excluding restructuring and other costs increased the ratio by 0.5. Dividend payout ratios: Actual dividend payout decisions will continue to be subject to our Board's assessment and the determination of our financial position and outlook, as well as our long-term dividend payout ratio guideline of 65 to 75% of prospective net earnings per share. The disclosed basic and adjusted dividend payout ratios are historical measures utilizing the last four quarters of dividends declared and earnings per share. We estimate that we are within our target guideline on a prospective dividend payout ratio basis. The historical measures for the 12-month period ended March 31, 2017, are presented for illustrative purposes in evaluating our target guideline and both exceeded the objective range. At March 31, 2017, we had available liquidity of more than $1.1 billion from the TELUS revolving credit facility, approximately $123 million available liquidity from the TELUS International credit facility and $127 million available from uncommitted letters of credit facilities. In addition, we had $400 million available under our trade receivables securitization program (see Section 7.7 Sale of trade receivables). We are well within our objective of generally maintaining at least $1.0 billion of available liquidity. We have a $2.25 billion (or U.S. dollar equivalent) revolving credit facility with a syndicate of financial institutions that expires on May 31, 2021. The revolving credit facility is used for general corporate purposes, including the backstop of commercial paper, as required. Our revolving credit facility contains customary covenants, including a requirement that we not permit our consolidated leverage ratio to exceed 4.00 to 1.00 and that we not permit our consolidated coverage ratio to be less than 2.00 to 1.00, at the end of any financial quarter. Our consolidated leverage ratio was approximately 2.73 to 1.00 as at March 31, 2017, and our consolidated coverage ratio was approximately 8.48 to 1.00 as at March 31, 2017. These ratios are expected to remain well above the covenants. There are certain minor differences in the calculation of the leverage ratio and coverage ratio under the revolving credit facility, as compared with the calculation of Net debt to EBITDA - excluding restructuring and other costs and EBITDA - excluding restructuring and other costs interest coverage. Historically, the calculations have not been materially different. The covenants are not impacted by revaluation, if any, of Property, plant and equipment, Intangible assets or Goodwill for accounting purposes. Continued access to our credit facilities is not contingent on maintaining a specific credit rating. TELUS Corporation has an unsecured commercial paper program, which is backstopped by our revolving credit facility, enabling us to issue commercial paper up to a maximum aggregate amount of $1.4 billion at March 31, 2017, including a U.S. dollar-denominated commercial paper program for up to U.S.$1.0 billion within this maximum aggregate amount. The commercial paper program is to be used for general corporate purposes, including, but not limited to, capital expenditures and investments. Our ability to reasonably access the commercial paper market in Canada and the U.S. is dependent on our credit ratings (see Section 7.8 Credit ratings). As at March 31, 2017, our subsidiary TELUS International (Cda) Inc. had a bank credit facility, secured by its assets, expiring on May 31, 2021, with a syndicate of financial institutions. The credit facility is composed of a revolving U.S.$115 million component and an amortizing U.S.$215 million term loan component. The credit facility is non-recourse to TELUS Corporation. As at March 31, 2017, $305 million ($298 million net of unamortized issue costs) was outstanding, all of which was denominated in U.S. dollars (U.S.$229 million), with a weighted average interest rate of 2.72%. At March 31, 2017, we had $214 million of letters of credit outstanding (December 31, 2016 - $210 million), issued under various uncommitted facilities; such letter of credit facilities are in addition to the ability to provide letters of credit pursuant to our committed bank credit facility. Available liquidity under various uncommitted letters of credit facilities was $127 million at March 31, 2017. TELUS Communications Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of TELUS, is a party to an agreement with an arm's-length securitization trust associated with a major Schedule I Canadian bank, under which it is able to sell an interest in certain trade receivables for an amount up to a maximum of $500 million. The agreement is in effect until December 31, 2018, and available liquidity was $400 million as at March 31, 2017. (See Note 22 of the interim consolidated financial statements.) Sales of trade receivables in securitization transactions are recognized as collateralized Short-term borrowings and thus do not result in our de-recognition of the trade receivables sold. TELUS Communications Inc. is required to maintain at least a BB credit rating by DBRS Ltd., or the securitization trust may require the sale program to be wound down prior to the end of the term. The necessary credit rating was exceeded as of May 11, 2017. There were no changes to our investment grade credit ratings as of May 11, 2017. Our financial instruments and the nature of certain risks that they may be subject to were described in Section 7.9 of our 2016 annual MD&A. As a component of our capital structure financial policies, discussed in Section 4.3 Liquidity and capital resources, we manage liquidity risk by: maintaining a daily cash pooling process that enables us to manage our available liquidity and our liquidity requirements according to our actual needs; maintaining an agreement to sell trade receivables to an arm's-length securitization trust; maintaining bilateral bank facilities and syndicated credit facilities; maintaining a commercial paper program; maintaining an in-effect shelf prospectus; continuously monitoring forecast and actual cash flows; and managing maturity profiles of financial assets and financial liabilities. As of the date of this MD&A, we can offer up to $1.2 billion of long-term debt or equity securities pursuant to a shelf prospectus that is effective until April 2018. At March 31, 2017, we had available liquidity of more than $1.1 billion from unutilized credit facilities and $127 million from uncommitted letters of credit facilities (see Section 7.6 Credit facilities), as well as $400 million available under our trade receivables securitization program (see Section 7.7 Sale of trade receivables). We also had $794 million in cash and temporary investments at March 31, 2017 of which a portion was used to close the MTS transaction as noted in Section 1.3. This adheres to our objective of generally maintaining at least $1 billion of available liquidity. We believe that our investment grade credit ratings contribute to reasonable access to capital markets. As at March 31, 2017, our contractual commitments related to the acquisition of property, plant and equipment were $270 million through to December 31, 2021, as compared to $436 million over a period ending December 31, 2020, reported in our 2016 annual report. The decrease was primarily due to the receipt of materials in connection with the execution of our planned capital program during the first quarter of 2017. A number of claims and lawsuits (including class actions and intellectual property infringement claims) seeking damages and other relief are pending against us and, in some cases, numerous other wireless carriers and telecommunications service providers. As well, we have received notice of, or are aware of, certain possible claims (including intellectual property infringement claims) against us. It is not currently possible for us to predict the outcome of such claims, possible claims and lawsuits due to various factors, including: the preliminary nature of some claims; uncertain damage theories and demands; an incomplete factual record; uncertainty concerning legal theories, procedures and their resolution by the courts, at both the trial and the appeal levels; and the unpredictable nature of opposing parties and their demands. However, when it is determined in respect of a particular claim that payments to claimants are probable, we accrue an estimate of the liability. Subject to the foregoing limitations, management is of the opinion, based upon legal assessments and information presently available, that it is unlikely that any liability, to the extent not provided for through insurance or otherwise, would have a material effect on our financial position and the results of our operations, including cash flows, with the exception of the items disclosed in Note 29 of the interim consolidated financial statements. At March 31, 2017, we had no liability recorded in respect of our indemnification obligations. As at March 31, 2017, TELUS Corporation controlled 100% of the equity of TELUS Communications Inc., which, in turn, ultimately controlled 100% of TELUS Communications Company and TELE-MOBILE COMPANY. This is unchanged from December 31, 2016. Our key management personnel have authority and responsibility for overseeing, planning, directing and controlling our activities. They consist of our Board of Directors and our Executive Leadership Team. Total compensation expense amounts for key management personnel were $8 million in the first quarter of 2017, as compared to $16 million in the corresponding period in 2016. See Note 30(a) of the interim consolidated financial statements for additional detail. We provided management and administrative services to our defined benefit pension plans. Charges for these services were on a cost recovery basis and were immaterial. In the first quarter of 2017, we had transactions with real estate joint ventures, which are related parties to us, as set out in Note 21 of our interim consolidated financial statements. As at March 31, 2017, the proportion of space leased in the TELUS Garden office tower was approximately 99%. Closing was completed for the majority of residential units in the TELUS Garden residential condominium project in the fourth quarter of 2016, with the remaining units expected to close in 2017. For the TELUS Sky™ real estate joint venture, commitments and contingent liabilities include construction-related contractual commitments through to 2018 (approximately $114 million at March 31, 2017) and construction credit facilities ($342 million with three Canadian financial institutions as 66 2/3% lender and TELUS as 33 1/3% lender). Our significant accounting policies are described in Note 1 of the Consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2016. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) requires us to make estimates, assumptions and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities as at the date of the financial statements, as well as the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Our critical accounting estimates and significant judgments are generally discussed with the Audit Committee each quarter and are described in Section 8.1 of our 2016 annual MD&A, which is hereby incorporated by reference. Our accounting policy developments were discussed in Section 8.2 Accounting policy developments of our 2016 annual MD&A. See Note 2 of the interim consolidated financial statements for additional details. This section contains forward-looking statements, which should be read together with the Caution regarding forward-looking statements at the beginning of this MD&A. The assumptions for our 2017 outlook, as described in Section 9 General trends, outlook and assumptions of our 2016 annual MD&A, remain the same, except as updated below. Our telecommunications, broadcasting and radiocommunication services are regulated under federal laws by various authorities, including the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) and the Minister of Canadian Heritage. The following are updates to Section 9.4 Telecommunications industry regulatory developments and proceedings in our 2016 annual MD&A. ISED regulates, among other matters, the allocation and use of radio spectrum in Canada and licenses radio apparatus, frequency bands and/or radio channels within various frequency bands to service providers and private users. The department also establishes the terms and conditions attaching to such radio authorizations, including restrictions on licence transfers, coverage obligations, research and development obligations, annual reporting, and obligations concerning mandated roaming and antenna site sharing with competitors. The CRTC and the federal government have initiated public proceedings to review various matters. They are discussed below. The CRTC has commenced Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2017-49 to review the regulatory framework for the competitor quality of service regime (CQoS). CQoS applies to certain wholesale services we provide to competitors. It establishes standards for certain aspects of service provision and requires TELUS to rebate a portion of rates where we fail to meet those standards. TELUS is also subject to tracking, reporting and auditing requirements. This proceeding will consider whether a regime is needed, what services should be subject to the regime, which service providers will be subject to the regime, the appropriateness of the rate rebates and other similar matters. A decision is not expected before the first quarter of 2018. This proceeding is not expected to have a material impact on TELUS. On February 2, 2017, the CRTC initiated a proceeding to review the regulatory framework and marketplace environment for text-based message relay services. Local exchange carriers are required to provide these services that enable people with a hearing or speech disability to make and receive telephone calls. The CRTC has initiated this review because these services are in declining use in light of technological developments that have made other text messaging services convenient for customers. The proceeding will conclude on June 2, 2017. TELUS will participate in this review. It is not expected that the outcome of this proceeding will have a material impact on TELUS. The CRTC has issued Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2017-92 in which it is seeking comments on its proposed approach to the phase-out of the local service subsidy regime and associated policies. This notice is part of the followup activities resulting from Modern Telecommunications Services - The path forward for Canada's digital economy, Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2016-496 issued on December 21, 2016. TELUS continues to have the obligation to serve to provide local telephone service in all exchanges which our competitors do not have. TELUS will participate in this proceeding to seek greater pricing flexibility in regulated high cost exchanges if subsidies are removed and ensure we are compensated for any obligation to serve. It is unknown at this time whether the outcome of this proceeding will have a material financial impact on TELUS. Development of the CRTC's New Broadband Funding Regime On April 25, 2017, the CRTC issued Development of the Commission's broadband funding regime, Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2017-112. This consultation follows on the CRTC's Modern Telecommunications Services decision issued on December 21, 2016, in which the CRTC set a new universal service objective that included fixed and mobile wireless broadband Internet access services, and stated that it would begin to shift the focus of its current regulatory frameworks from wireline voice services to broadband in order to assist in expanding the availability and adoption of broadband Internet access services. The CRTC also set out its preliminary views on the establishment of a new broadband funding mechanism at that time. The CRTC has now issued a notice calling for comments on the various issues pertaining to the establishment of the new broadband funding regime, including governance of the new fund, operating and accountability frameworks, as well as eligibility and assessment criteria for proposed projects. The CRTC is also seeking comments on its preliminary views on the new broadband fund set out in Telecom Regulatory Policy 2016-496, and is also seeking responses to a series of questions. It is too early to determine the potential impact that this proceeding may have on TELUS. Review and modernizing of the Broadcasting Act and Telecommunications Act In the federal government's budget announcement on March 22, 2017, the federal government recognized the impact of the digital age on Canada's media and broadcasting industries and indicated its intention to review and modernize the Broadcasting Act and the Telecommunications Act, looking specifically at issues relating to content creation in the digital age, net neutrality and cultural diversity. This announcement dovetails with the review of Canada's cultural policies as described in Section 9.4 of our 2016 annual MD&A. TELUS participated in all phases of that consultation and will continue to participate in the upcoming phases of this review of the Acts. Further details on this review will be announced in the coming months. It is unknown at this time whether there will be a material impact on TELUS' operations resulting from this review. The principal risks and uncertainties that could affect our future business results and associated risk mitigation activities were described in our 2016 annual MD&A. 11.1 Non-GAAP and other financial measures We have issued guidance on and report certain non-GAAP measures that are used to evaluate the performance of TELUS, as well as to determine compliance with debt covenants and to manage our capital structure. As non-GAAP measures generally do not have a standardized meaning, they may not be comparable to similar measures presented by other issuers. Securities regulations require such measures to be clearly defined, qualified and reconciled with their nearest GAAP measure. Adjusted Net income and adjusted basic earnings per share: These measures are used to evaluate performance at a consolidated level and exclude items that may obscure the underlying trends in business performance. These measures should not be considered alternatives to Net income and basic earnings per share in measuring TELUS' performance. Items that may, in management's view, obscure the underlying trends in business performance include significant gains or losses associated with real estate redevelopment partnerships, gains on the exchange of wireless spectrum licences, restructuring and other costs, long-term debt prepayment premiums (when applicable), income tax-related adjustments and asset retirements related to restructuring activities. (See Analysis of Net income and Analysis of basic EPS in Section 1.3). Capital intensity: This measure is calculated as capital expenditures (excluding spectrum licences) divided by total operating revenues. This measure provides a basis for comparing the level of capital expenditures to those of other companies of varying size within the same industry. Dividend payout ratio: This is a historical measure calculated as the sum of the last four quarterly dividends declared per Common Share, as reported in the financial statements, divided by the sum of basic earnings per share for the most recent four quarters for interim reporting periods. For fiscal years, the denominator is annual basic earnings per share. Our policy guideline for the annual dividend payout ratio is on a prospective basis, rather than on a trailing basis, and is 65 to 75% of sustainable earnings per share on a prospective basis. (See Section 7.5 Liquidity and capital resource measures.) Dividend payout ratio of adjusted net earnings: This ratio is a historical measure calculated as the sum of the last four quarterly dividends declared per Common Share, as reported in the financial statements, divided by adjusted net earnings per share. Adjusted net earnings per share is basic earnings per share, as used in the Dividend payout ratio, adjusted to exclude the gain on the exchange of wireless spectrum licences, net gains and equity income from real estate joint venture developments, business acquisition-related provisions, immediately vesting transformative compensation expense, long-term debt prepayment premium (when applicable) and income tax-related adjustments. Earnings coverage: This measure is defined in the Canadian Securities Administrators' National Instrument 41-101 and related instruments, and is calculated as follows: EBITDA (earnings before interest, income taxes, depreciation and amortization): We have issued guidance on and report EBITDA because it is a key measure used to evaluate performance at a consolidated level. EBITDA is commonly reported and widely used by investors and lending institutions as an indicator of a company's operating performance and ability to incur and service debt, and as a valuation metric. EBITDA should not be considered an alternative to Net income in measuring TELUS' performance, nor should it be used as an exclusive measure of cash flow. EBITDA as calculated by TELUS is equivalent to Operating revenues less the total of Goods and services purchased expense and Employee benefits expense. We calculate EBITDA - excluding restructuring and other costs, as it is a component of the EBITDA - excluding restructuring and other costs interest coverage ratio and the Net debt to EBITDA - excluding restructuring and other costs ratio. We may also calculate Adjusted EBITDA to exclude items of an unusual nature that do not reflect our ongoing operations and should not, in our opinion, be considered in a valuation metric, or should not be included in an assessment of our ability to service or incur debt. EBITDA - excluding restructuring and other costs interest coverage: This measure is defined as EBITDA -excluding restructuring and other costs, divided by Net interest cost, calculated on a 12-month trailing basis. This measure is similar to the coverage ratio covenant in our credit facilities, as described in Section 7.6 Credit facilities. Free cash flow: We report this measure as a supplementary indicator of our operating performance. It should not be considered an alternative to the measures in the interim consolidated statements of cash flows. Free cash flow excludes certain working capital changes (such as trade receivables and trade payables), proceeds from divested assets and other sources and uses of cash, as found in the Consolidated statements of cash flows. It provides an indication of how much cash generated by operations is available after capital expenditures (excluding purchases of spectrum licences) that may be used to, among other things, pay dividends, repay debt, purchase shares or make other investments. Free cash flow may be supplemented from time to time by proceeds from divested assets or financing activities. The following reconciles our definition of free cash flow with cash provided by operating activities. Net debt: We believe that net debt is a useful measure because it represents the amount of Short-term borrowings and long-term debt obligations that are not covered by available Cash and temporary investments. The nearest IFRS measure to net debt is Long-term debt, including Current maturities of Long-term debt. Net debt is a component of the Net debt to EBITDA - excluding restructuring and other costs ratio. Net debt to EBITDA - excluding restructuring and other costs: This measure is defined as net debt at the end of the period divided by 12-month trailing EBITDA - excluding restructuring and other costs. Our long-term policy guideline for this ratio is from 2.00 to 2.50 times. (See discussion in Section 7.5 Liquidity and capital resource measures.) This measure is similar to the leverage ratio covenant in our credit facilities, as described in Section 7.6 Credit facilities. Net interest cost: This measure is the denominator in the calculation of EBITDA - excluding restructuring and other costs interest coverage. Net interest cost is defined as financing costs, excluding capitalized long-term debt interest, employee defined benefit plans net interest and recoveries on redemption and repayment of debt, calculated on a 12-month trailing basis. No recoveries on redemption and repayment of debt were recorded in 2017 and 2016. Expenses recorded for the long-term debt prepayment premium, if any, are included in net interest cost. Net interest cost was $564 million in the 12-month period ended March 31, 2017, and $494 million in the 12-month period ended March 31, 2016. Restructuring and other costs: With the objective of reducing ongoing costs, we incur associated incremental, non-recurring restructuring costs. We may also incur atypical charges when undertaking major or transformational changes to our business or operating models. In addition, we include incremental external costs incurred in connection with business acquisition or disposition activity, as well as litigation costs, in the context of significant losses and settlements, in other costs. The following measures are industry metrics that are useful in assessing the operating performance of a wireless and wireline telecommunications entity, but do not have a standardized meaning under IFRS-IASB. Average revenue per subscriber unit per month (ARPU) for wireless subscribers is calculated as network revenue divided by the average number of subscriber units on the network during the period and is expressed as a rate per month. Churn per month (or churn) is calculated as the number of subscriber units deactivated during a given period divided by the average number of subscriber units on the network during the period and is expressed as a rate per month. A TELUS, Koodo or Public Mobile brand prepaid wireless subscriber is deactivated when the subscriber has no usage for 90 days following expiry of the prepaid credits. Wireless subscriber unit (subscriber) is defined as an active mobile recurring revenue-generating unit (e.g. mobile phone, tablet or mobile Internet key) with a unique subscriber identifier (SIM or IMEI number). In addition, TELUS has a direct billing or support relationship with the user of each device. Subscriber units exclude machine-to-machine devices (a subset of the Internet of Things), such as those used for asset tracking, remote control monitoring and meter readings, vending machines and wireless automated teller machines. Wireline subscriber connection is defined as an active recurring revenue-generating unit that has access to stand-alone services, including fixed Internet access, TELUS TV and residential network access lines (NALs). In addition, TELUS has a direct billing or support relationship with the user of each service. Reported subscriber units exclude business NALs as the impact of migrating from voice lines to IP services has led to business NAL losses without a similar decline in revenue, thus diminishing its relevance as a key performance indicator.


Gifford R.,University of Victoria | Comeau L.A.,Royal Roads University
Global Environmental Change | Year: 2011

The effect of motivational versus sacrifice message framing on perceived climate change competence, engagement, and 15 mitigative behavioral intentions was examined in a large Canadian community sample (n= 1038). Perceived competence, engagement, and several behavioral intentions were significantly greater after exposure to motivational framing than after sacrifice framing. Gender, age, income, and educational level moderated some results, and moral engagement and agentic language also played a role. The results support the use of motivational frames rather than sacrifice frames to increase the climate-related engagement and activation of community members. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

VICTORIA, BC--(Marketwired - February 17, 2017) - Victoria's Bob Strachan, FCPA, FCMA, C.Dir was honoured with a Lifetime Achievement Award by the Chartered Professional Accountants of British Columbia (CPABC). The award recognizes Strachan's sustained distinction in his career, community service, and work within the accounting profession. Bob Strachan, FCPA, FCMA, C.Dir is principal of Bob Strachan & Associates. Before founding his firm in 2013, he held a number of management positions as an accountant with the Capital Regional District (CRD) from 1986 to 2013. Previously, he held roles with the Vancouver Island Health Authority and the Province of BC. While at the CRD, Strachan was a lead in the implementation of a new enterprise risk management program, enterprise information system, and corporate asset management program. Under his leadership, the CRD received numerous awards from the Government Finance Officers Association for excellence in financial reporting. Strachan is highly regarded for his contributions to the accounting profession, and played a pivotal role in the unification of Canada's profession. He led the CMA Canada board through merger discussions and developed unification strategies. In 2012, he was co-chair of the National Steering Committee that helped to develop the CPA Collaboration Accord and oversaw the formation of CPA Canada. Strachan went on to serve as vice-chair and chair of the CPA Canada board. Strachan worked with CPA boards in every province to ensure that unification of the profession was fully integrated within the national and provincial partnership. In addition, Strachan served on the CMABC board, including as chair (2001-2003), and on the CMA Canada board, including as chair (2009-2011). He is the former chair of CPA Canada's Nominating and Governance Committee, and chaired CPA Canada's President and CEO Search Committee. Today, Strachan is a member of CPA Canada's Corporate Oversight and Governance Board and the Chartered Professional Accountants' Education Foundation of BC. Strachan has generously shared his expertise with other organizations, including by serving on the boards of the Financial Management Institute of Canada (Victoria chapter) and Camosun College Foundation (chair), as well as with Royal Roads University's Master of Arts in Leadership program and the Province of BC's Accounting Policy Advisory Committee. He also makes time to volunteer. Strachan has served as a director of Leadership Victoria, and coached and served in executive positions with amateur sports organizations. Strachan obtained his CMA and fellowship designations in 1995 and 2004, respectively. Quote Richard Rees, FCPA, FCA, president and CEO, CPABC "Bob is truly deserving of the Lifetime Achievement Award. Throughout his career, he has dedicated his time towards the betterment of the accounting profession and his community. His contributions are invaluable and we are extremely proud of Bob's achievements." NOTE TO JOURNALISTS: Publication quality photos of the recipients are available. About CPA British Columbia The Chartered Professional Accountants of British Columbia (CPABC) is the training, governing, and regulatory body for almost 35,000 CPA members and 5,500 CPA students and candidates. CPABC carries out its primary mission to protect the public by enforcing the highest professional and ethical standards and contributing to the advancement of public policy. CPAs are recognized internationally for bringing superior financial expertise, strategic thinking, business insight, and leadership to organizations.


VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA--(Marketwired - Feb. 22, 2017) - Benz Mining Corp. (the "Company" or "Benz") (NEX:BZ.H), is pleased to announce a non-brokered private placement of up to 4,166,666 units (each, a "Unit") at a price of $0.12 per Unit, for gross proceeds of up to $500,000 (the "Private Placement"). Each Unit consisting of one common share in the capital of the Company (each a "Share") and one whole common share purchase warrant (each a "Warrant"). Each Warrant will entitle the holder to purchase one Share (a "Warrant Share") at a price of $0.15 per Warrant Share for a period of 24 months following closing. The net proceeds from the Private Placement will be used to fund the identification and completion of a mineral property transaction and working capital. All of the Shares issued pursuant to the Private Placement will be subject to a four-month hold period from the date of issue. The Private Placement is subject to approval from the NEX board of the TSX Venture Exchange (the "Exchange"). The Company is also pleased to announce the appointment of Mr. Michael Konnert to the Company's board of directors and to the management team in the capacity of VP Finance & Corporate Development. Mr. Konnert will be responsible for directing the Company's efforts relating to project acquisition, capital raising and capital markets awareness. Mr. Konnert has nearly a decade of experience in the natural resources industry, specifically in executing successful corporate development and capital market strategies for leading mining companies. Mr. Konnert started his career with Pretium Resources in investor relations following their $265 million IPO, then moved to the role of Associate with Advanture Capital Partners, a mining focused merchant bank. Following that, he spent three years with Riverside Resources, a prospect generator. Most recently in a development role, Mr. Konnert helped grow SNL Financial's Metals and Mining arm, the industry's largest database, research and consulting group, toward their $2 billion merger with Standard and Poor's Capital IQ. After the sale of SNL, Mr. Konnert formed Mine Capital Corp., a private equity partnership, which acquires and develops mining assets. Mr. Konnert's specific skill set includes comprehensive investor communication, capital raising, restructuring and taking companies to market. He holds a Bachelor of Commerce from Royal Roads University and a Diploma in Entrepreneurship British Columbia Institute of Technology. After giving effect to the Private Placement, the Company will have an aggregate of 6,474,772 common shares issued and outstanding. On behalf of the Board of Directors of Benz Mining Corp. Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the accuracy or adequacy of this release.


Moran J.A.,Royal Roads University
Plant signaling & behavior | Year: 2012

Nepenthes pitcher plants deploy tube-shaped pitchers to catch invertebrate prey; those of Nepenthes aristolochioides possess an unusual translucent dome. The hypothesis was tested that N. aristolochioides pitchers operate as light traps, by quantifying prey capture under three shade treatments. Flies are red-blind, with visual sensitivity maxima in the UV, blue, and green wavebands. Red celluloid filters were used to reduce the transmission of these wavebands into the interior of the pitchers. Those that were shaded at the rear showed a 3-fold reduction in Drosophila caught, relative to either unshaded control pitchers, or pitchers that were shaded at the front. Thus, light transmitted through the translucent dome is a fundamental component of N. aristolochioides' trapping mechanism.


Cox R.S.,Royal Roads University | Perry K.-M.E.,Justice Institute of British Columbia
American Journal of Community Psychology | Year: 2011

In this paper we draw on the findings of a critical, multi-sited ethnographic study of two rural communities affected by a wildfire in British Columbia, Canada to examine the salience of place, identity, and social capital to the disaster recovery process and community disaster resilience. We argue that a reconfiguration of disaster recovery is required that more meaningfully considers the role of place in the disaster recovery process and opens up the space for a more reflective and intentional consideration of the disorientation and disruption associated with disasters and our organized response to that disorientation. We describe a social-psychological process, reorientation, in which affected individuals and communities navigate the psychological, social and emotional responses to the symbolic and material changes to social and geographic place that result from the fire's destruction. The reorientation process emphasizes the critical importance of place not only as an orienting framework in recovery but also as the ground upon which social capital and community disaster resilience are built. This approach to understanding and responding to the disorientation of disasters has implications for community psychologists and other service providers engaged in supporting disaster survivors. This includes the need to consider the complex dynamic of contextual and cultural factors that influence the disaster recovery process. © 2011 Society for Community Research and Action.


Kool R.,Royal Roads University
Ecological Economics | Year: 2013

The voice of the prophet has both disquieted the complacent and comfortable and provided direction for those willing to listen. I argue it is the environmental science community, and especially those engaged in ecological economics, sustainability analysis and climate change research, that are acting as modern-day prophets in direct continuation of the biblical prophetic voice, and using as an exemplar the 1972 text, Limits to Growth. Providing analysis of their contemporary situation and then projecting from those situations into the future, prophets describe the outcome of the trends they see and offer warnings about collective dangers being faced. The life of a prophet, both then and now, is not simple, and those offering penetrating analysis of their society face a variety of hardships and threats. © 2012 Elsevier B.V..


Drawing from three years of fieldwork - including over 250 journeys and about 400 interviews - conducted in ferry-dependent coastal and insular communities of British Columbia, this paper extends the concept of constellation of mobility and provides empirical evidence to argue for its relevance. Coined by Cresswell, the concept of constellations of mobility refers to historically and geographically specific formations of movement inclusive of relational experiences, practices, and politics. By focusing on two of the constitutive parts indicated by Cresswell (experience and route) and a third one originally developed here (remove) ethnographic data description and analysis show how ferry (im)mobility in ferry-dependent communities contributes to spatializing dynamics of insulation and isolation. Positive affective aspects of these spatializations, such as uniqueness and distinction, place-attachment, sense of place, place-identity, safety, connection, and remoteness, as well as negative aspects, such as marginalization, divisiveness, disconnection, fear, and confinement are outlined. © The Author(s) 2011.


Vannini P.,Royal Roads University
Environment and Planning D: Society and Space | Year: 2011

Drawing upon three years of ethnographic fieldwork conducted in the ferry-dependent islands and remote coastal communities of British Columbia, this paper examines the process of catching a ferry in time for a scheduled sailing. Through performance, interactionist, and nonrepresentational theory, I argue that the weaving of a journey toward the ferry terminal can be a suspenseful drama, within which a scheduled departure works as a potential to be actualized through the performance of skillful acts of mobility. The affective, ritualistic, and playful components of passengers' journeys are examined through the lens of performance. Timing, spacing, and acting occasion differential ecologies of affect.

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