Royal Marsden NHS Hospital

Sutton, United Kingdom

Royal Marsden NHS Hospital

Sutton, United Kingdom
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Flux G.D.,Royal Marsden NHS Hospital | O'Sullivan J.,Queen's University of Belfast | Gaze M.N.,University College London | Prise K.M.,Queen's University of Belfast
British Journal of Radiology | Year: 2017

Cancer has been treated with radiopharmaceuticals for 80 years. A recent National Cancer Research Institute report from the Clinical and Translational Radiotherapy Research Working Group reviews the current status of molecular radiotherapy and has highlighted the barriers to and opportunities for increased research activities. The report recommends a number of actions to promote this field, which in the dawning age of personalized medicine and theragnostics is of increasing importance, particularly with the clinical introduction of a range of new commercial radiotherapeutics at costs in line with those seen for conventional chemotherapeutics. These recommendations recognize the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to the development of molecular radiotherapy and the particular need for investment in radiopharmacies and personalized dosimetry. There are many areas to be investigated including adaptive treatment planning, the use of radiosensitizers and translational radiation biology. Progress in these areas will result in significant patient benefit and more cost-effective use of increasingly expensive therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. A concerted effort from the community, from funding bodies and from health service providers is now needed to address the scientific and logistical changes necessary to realize the potential offered by this currently underused treatment modality. © 2017 The Authors.


Chittenden S.J.,Royal Marsden NHS Hospital | Hindorf C.,Skåne University Hospital | Parker C.C.,Royal Marsden Hospital | Lewington V.J.,Guys Hospital | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Nuclear Medicine | Year: 2015

The aim of this single-site, open-label clinical trial was to determine the biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, absorbed doses, and safety from 2 sequential weight-based administrations of 223Ra-dichloride in patients with bone metastases due to castration-refractory prostate cancer. Methods: Six patients received 2 intravenous injections of 223Radichloride, 6 wk apart, at 100 kBq/kg of whole-body weight. The pharmacokinetics and biodistribution as a function of time were determined, and dosimetry was performed for a range of organs including bone surfaces, red marrow, kidneys, gut, and whole body using scintigraphic imaging; external counting; and blood, fecal, and urine collection. Safety was assessed from adverse events. Results: The injected activity cleared rapidly from blood, with 1.1% remaining at 24 h. The main route of excretion was via the gut, although no significant toxicity was reported. Most of the administered activity was taken up rapidly into bone (61% at 4 h). The range of absorbed doses delivered to the bone surfaces from α emissions was 2,331-13,118 mGy/MBq. The ranges of absorbed doses delivered to the red marrow were 177-994 and 1-5 mGy/MBq from activity on the bone surfaces and from activity in the blood, respectively. No activity-limiting toxicity was observed at these levels of administration. The absorbed doses from the second treatment were correlated significantly with the first for a combination of the whole body, bone surfaces, kidneys, and liver. Conclusion: A wide range of interpatient absorbed doses was delivered to normal organs. Intrapatient absorbed doses were significantly correlated between the 2 administrations for any given patient. The lack of gastrointestinal toxicity is likely due to the low absorbed doses delivered to the gut wall from the gut contents. The lack of adverse myelotoxicity implies that the absorbed dose delivered from the circulating activity may be a more relevant guide to the potential for marrow toxicity than that due to activity on the bone surfaces. COPYRIGHT © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

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