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News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

The housing market slowed down in October, with the number of mortgages granted to home movers down 20% on a year ago, according to data from the Council of Mortgage Lenders. There was also a fall in the buy-to-let market, where activity has been hit by tax changes. But the lending market was bolstered by the amount of remortgage activity which hit its highest level since January 2009. The data was seized upon as evidence that the EU referendum in June had dented confidence and a sign that home owners were responding to the Bank of England’s rate cut to 0.25% after the vote for Brexit. The CML said the amount borrowers were paying as a percentage of their household income to service repayments fell to a record low for both first-time buyers and home movers at 17.6%. Paul Smee, its director general, said that while buy-to-let lending was weak, the remortgage market was strong. “This appears to be linked to borrowers taking advantage of the repricing of mortgages following the base rate cut,” he said. About 28,900 loans were granted to home movers in October, a 20% decrease on a year ago and 8% down month on month. Home movers borrowed £5.9bn, down 9% on a the previous month and 18% on a year ago. The figures followed last month’s warning from the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors that number of properties on the market fell in October while the number of buyers rose. Remortgage activity totalled £6.1bn, up 11% on September and 7% on a year ago. There was also a rise in the number of loans to 34,700, up 10% month on month and 5% on a year ago. Andy Knee, the chief executive of legal services provider LMS, said: “October was a strong month for the remortgage market, with activity hitting an eight-year high, while the rest of the market stood still. The ramifications of June’s referendum result are hitting home. “Homeowners are taking advantage of low rates to secure reduced monthly repayments.” Activity in the buy-to-let market – which is being monitored by the Bank of England – has been slowing as a result of the 3% stamp duty surcharge on second properties introduced in April. Lending increased 7% month on month to £3bn, but remains 21% lower year on year. Nearly two-thirds of buy-to-let loans were remortgages rather than for house purchases.


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

Britain’s vote to leave the EU is finally feeding through to the UK economy, according to a Guardian analysis that shows rising inflation is offsetting brisk trade for businesses. Buoyant consumer spending, a low unemployment rate, rising house prices and continued growth for the country’s dominant services sector point to a strong finish to the year, defying earlier forecasts from the Bank of England and others that the economy would grind to a standstill. But worries are growing over prospects for 2017 as signs emerge that the Brexit vote’s blow to the pound is stoking inflation and hitting people’s spending power. As the starting date for negotiations over leaving the EU approaches, the pound has come under fresh pressure in recent weeks and been prone to further downward lurches with every political mention of Brexit – most recently from Scotland’s first minister Nicola Sturgeon raising the prospect of a new independence vote for Scotland. To track the impact of the Brexit vote on a monthly basis, the Guardian has chosen eight economic indicators, along with the value of the pound and the performance of the FTSE. The dashboard for December shows a better than expected performance in four of the eight categories. Two were as expected, one was worse and inflation was higher than economists had forecast, fanning fears that household budgets will be squeezed by higher prices next year. Six months on from the vote to leave the EU, the latest batch of figures show wage growth remains solid, headline unemployment remains low, business activity continues to expand and house prices are still rising. The FTSE 100 leading share index is close to an all-time high hit in October and the more domestically focused FTSE midcap index is above its pre-referendum level. But the pace of hiring has slowed, retail sales growth has eased off and inflation is at a two-year high as the weak pound raises the cost of imports to the UK. The public finances were in a worse state than forecast in November and, looking ahead, they are expected to be in deficit for far longer than had been predicted before the referendum. Britain’s trading position improved more than expected in the latest monthly figures but substantial revisions to earlier data show the trade gap with the rest of the world ballooned to a near three-year high in the three months following the referendum. Economists point to several indicators suggesting negative effects of the Brexit vote could be more keenly felt in 2017. Surveys and business investment figures suggest British-based firms are more reluctant to spend. Consumers have become more cautious and they expect inflation to quicken over the coming year. Writing in the Guardian, a former member of the Bank’s monetary policy committee, David Blanchflower, said some of the data since the Brexit vote had come in better than he had feared but that there were signs this could be as good as it gets for the economy. “Business confidence is low and there is evidence that optimism is falling among businesses and consumers. My suspicion is that the news is not going to get better,” said Blanchflower, professor of economics at Dartmouth College in the US. “The consumer has held up pretty well and still seems to be spending and GDP growth at 0.5% is not to be sneezed at. But the fall in the pound and the steady rise in inflation because of the rise in import prices was always going to have an impact,” he added. A report from the Bank of England’s regional agents on Wednesday flagged the impact of higher import prices on inflation. But the agents – the Bank’s eyes and ears on the ground – noted silver linings from the weaker pound. Tourist spending was rising and exports had also been helped by the currency’s fall, which makes UK goods more competitive overseas. Since the last dashboard, the government’s independent forecasters at the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) have published a new outlook for the the economy. They predict weaker business spending and a squeeze on consumers from higher inflation will dent the economy next year, but warnings for a post-referendum recession should prove unfounded. Publishing its forecasts alongside Philip Hammond’s autumn statement of tax and spending measures, the OBR said the economy would likely expand by just 1.4% in 2017, compared with the 2.2% it had predicted before the referendum. Hammond, was quick to point out that even that lower growth would still leave Britain outperforming France and Italy next year and possibly Germany too. Andrew Sentance, also a former member of the MPC, said the signs of weaker investment and employment and a squeeze on consumer spending pointed to slower growth for the UK economy next year. But much depended on the country’s key trading partners, the rest of the EU and the US, Sentance wrote in the Guardian. “Current forecasts suggest that Europe and the US will continue to grow reasonably well in 2017, which will help temper the UK slowdown. Next year may not be so bad for the UK after all, but we will need a reasonably healthy global economy to keep us moving forward.” Experts have warned that the potential Brexit blow to the economy, coupled with the government’s continued push to bring down spending will leave many households struggling with lower incomes next year. Mark Carney, the governor of the Bank of England, has warned that the UK is suffering its “first lost decade since the 1860s” and highlighted a squeeze on household budgets that predates the referendum. Respected thinktank the Institute for Fiscal Studies said workers in Britain face the longest squeeze on their pay for 70 years. This week, the Resolution Foundation thinktank warned the UK faces the risk next year of a return to the squeeze in real pay suffered earlier in the decade. It said 2015-16 had been the fastest year of real wage growth since 2001 but said the combination of low inflation and strongly rising employment would not be repeated. For the housing market, forecasters expect a slowdown next year. A longstanding shortage of homes will mean prices keep rising but at a much more modest pace of 3%, predicts the the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors. Property firm Savills has suggested that prices will remain flat across the UK. The UK’s largest building society, Nationwide, expects the UK average price to increase by 2% over the year, below the rate of growth it has reported in 2016.


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

MARRAKECH, Morocco--(BUSINESS WIRE)--RICS (Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors) is continuing to push for the built environment sector to lead in achieving its global climate change commitments as the 22nd Conference of the Parties (COP22) gets underway in Marrakech, Morocco from 7 – 18 November 2016. Last year, RICS joined governments, industry and civil society groups at the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21), in Paris, France. The global climate change summit, facilitated by the Uni


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: EE-19-2014 | Award Amount: 1.57M | Year: 2015

ReValue aims to lead the development of appraisal norms and standards that REcorgnise Energy Efficiency Value in social and private residential real estate. Financing decisions in real estate are often based on formal appraisals of value. Current norms on valuation, such as RICS, recognise Energy Effiency (EE) as a potential source of value, but do not require taking this into account in appraisals, nor provide clear guidance on how to do so. As a result, investors are not provided with the formal basis to invest in or to provide financing (eg through mortgages) for EE components. For a standard renovation of a residential unit, up to 10k Euro in EE could be made bankable if valuation norms and standards would better reflect long term EE value. At EU level, this could potentially unlock 20Bn Euro per year in financing of EE measures. Since 26% of EUs energy is consumed in homes, increasing investment on EE could significantly contribute to H2020 targets. Specific ReValue objectives are: 1 develop and propose a set of norms and policies in the valuation of residential property that recognise EE 2 align valuation techniques with such norms 3 validate the framework in 4 pilot projects across Europe 4 Stimulate uptake of the framework through widely recognised norms and support from key industry stakeholders ReValues consortium is industry-lead, including RICS, one of the globally recognised standardisation bodies, and Savills, a leading valuer, and academic and professional experts in accounting, economics and EE design. Through observer roles, the project collaborates with building owners across Europe, investors and a range of entities that support exploitation and dissemination of project results. In doing so, ReValue will contribute to reaching EE19s expected impact, by aligning valuation norms for optimal levels of investment of energy efficiency, and by increasing trust of investors and financiers in the financial viability of energy efficient measures.


HONG KONG--(BUSINESS WIRE)--RICS (Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors) kicked off its second International Heritage Conservation Conference today at the premises of The Hong Kong Jockey Club. Officiated by Mr Clement Lau FRICS, Chair of RICS Hong Kong, Mr Wong Kam-sing, GBS, JP, Secretary for the Environment of Hong Kong SAR Government, Mr Winfried Engelbrecht-Bresges, GBS, JP, Chief Executive Officer, The Hong Kong Jockey Club, Mr Chris Brooke FRICS, Senior Vice President of RICS, Prof Daniel Ho FRICS, Chair of Organising Committee, and Mrs Edith Chan, Managing Director of RICS East Asia, the Conference gathered more than 200 industry professionals, business leaders, operators and government representatives to explore the social and economic benefits of built heritage conservation. The Conference brought together leaders involved in planning, policy setting, preservation and the operation of built heritage properties to review revitalisation and adaptive reuse projects. Heritage conservation experts shared insights on planning policies to facilitate future projects in Hong Kong, and analysed adaptive reuse case studies including the former Central Police Station compound (Tai Kwun), Cangdong project in Kaiping, China, and the Crown Wine Cellars in Hong Kong. Participants of four breakout sessions explored conservation and planning policy, adaptive reuse design, economic feasibility, and operating heritage properties. Mr Clement Lau FRICS, Chair of RICS Hong Kong Board, said, “In an era of rapid urbanisation and population growth, where cities face complex redevelopment challenges, heritage conservation and adaptive reuse must be considered as primary solutions – not just alternatives – in the growth and transformation process.” Mr Wong Kam-sing, GBS, JP, Secretary for the Environment of Hong Kong SAR Government, said, “Hong Kong's unique architecture not only enriches its history and development, but also dotted its city landscape and community. For this reason, the government introduced the heritage conservation policy in 2007. In response to the policy, we respect private property ownership and consider cost-effective economic incentives to encourage owners of buildings with heritage value to support the conservation programme.” Following the completion of the Conference, RICS will consolidate the discussions and suggestions made relating to the social and economic benefits of built heritage conservation for reference by built environment professionals. RICS promotes and enforces the highest professional qualifications and standards in the development and management of land, real estate, construction and infrastructure. Our name promises the consistent delivery of standards – bringing confidence to the markets we serve. We accredit 125,000 professionals and any individual or firm registered with RICS is subject to our quality assurance. Their expertise covers property, asset valuation, real estate management; the development of infrastructure; and the management of natural resources, such as mining, farms and woodland. From environmental assessments and building controls to negotiating land rights in an emerging economy; if our members are involved the same professional standards and ethics apply. We believe that standards underpin effective markets. With up to seventy per cent of the world’s wealth bound up in land and real estate, our sector is vital to economic development, helping to support stable, sustainable investment and growth around the globe. With offices covering the major political and financial centres of the world, our market presence means we are ideally placed to influence policy and embed professional standards. We work at a cross-governmental level, delivering international standards that will support a safe and vibrant marketplace in land, real estate, construction and infrastructure, for the benefit of all. We are proud of our reputation and work hard to protect it, so clients who work with an RICS professional can have confidence in the quality and ethics of the services they receive.


News Article | December 3, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

Ongoing uncertainty over the manner of the UK’s departure from the EU is likely to weigh down the property market in 2017, say experts, who predict little or no growth in prices amid a slowdown in sales. The Brexit referendum result and government measures to cool the buy-to-let market have hit the property market in 2016, and are expected to keep the lid on house prices next year too. In the immediate aftermath of the Brexit vote, the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors reported that large numbers of buyers and sellers had withdrawn from the market. Its most recent report showed the number of homes on estate agents’ books remaining low. Figures from HM Revenue & Customs show transactions surging in March before higher stamp duty rates were imposed on second homes, but these have now fallen to lower than in 2015. In August, for example, 96,720 sales were registered, compared with 104,280 a year earlier. Tom Sharman, head of real estate finance at NatWest, said he expected sales to be slow going into 2017 as potential buyers and sellers awaited clarity on the EU negotiations. But he added: “High employment, tight supply and a healthy mortgage market mean a widespread decline in prices seems unlikely.” Richard Donnell of property consultancy Hometrack expects transaction numbers to fall by more than 8% in some parts of the UK, including London. He said the capital had lost its status as property powerhouse over the past year. “There has been a noticeable pick-up in large cities such as Birmingham and Manchester, where prices are rising well ahead of earnings – at close to the national average of 8%,” he said. “The outlook for house-price growth in 2017 will depend on how much growth is sustained in regional markets, and the scale of the slowdown across London.” Property firm Knight Frank said London and the wider UK market had exceeded expectations since June’s vote, but thought economic uncertainty would lead to weaker growth in 2017. Forecasting a 1% rise in prices across the UK in 2017, and a 1% fall in London, it said consumer confidence would be hit when the UK formally served notice to quit the EU, which it is set to do within the first three months of next year. Outside the capital, according to Knight Frank, prices in Wales were expected to flatline, while all other regions would see growth, although the biggest rise in prices would be of just 2% – in the south-west of England. Savills, the upmarket estate agency, has predicted that the property market as a whole will flatline in 2017, although that headline forecast disguises variations around Britain. In the south of England, prices are expected to continue to rise, with the east of England seeing the highest growth, of 2.5% over the year. London and the East Midlands would be static, it said, but in the north of England, Wales and Scotland there would be falls. Unveiling the forecasts earlier this month, Lucian Cook, head of residential research at Savills, said Brexit was “complicating a natural shift towards the later stages of the housing market cycle, when the strongest growth is seen beyond London and the south-east. What is clear is that the housing market does not like political and economic uncertainty, and this points to a lower-growth, lower-transaction market across the board.” Prices in London’s most expensive neighbourhoods have been falling since late 2014, when new stamp duty increased the cost of the most expensive properties. The higher stamp duty on second homes knocked buyers’ appetite further, and the referendum has led to even more uncertainty. By Knight Frank’s reckoning, prices in Notting Hill, Kensington, Chelsea and other parts of what it calls prime west London have fallen by 7% this year. Henry Pryor, a buying agent for wealthy clients, said that since the referendum his inbox had been full of emails offering properties at a reduced prices. “In 30 years of buying and selling, I have never witnessed such a good time to negotiate a great deal,” he said. Pryor said he expected the slowdown in London would “ripple out along the M4 and up the M1. It may not reach Norfolk and Shropshire until next summer, but the sellers’ market is turning into a buyer’s market.” Another buying agent, Tracy Kellett, said she had seen an increase in estate agents offering sales behind the scenes. “I think this is to test the market, without the properties getting stale,” she said. “It’s a strong indication that agents don’t know where the market is.” Kellett said she did not thinkers sellers in prime London were desperate, “but those who want to sell are aware that they may not get what they would have done two months ago – and will get even less in another two months.” High-end building firm Berkeley Homes said last week that between May and October demand for its upmarket homes in London and the south-east was 20% down on the same period in 2015. The firm’s chief executive said the fall in volume was due to higher stamp duty – “an extraordinary attack on buy-to-let landlords” – and the uncertainty caused by the Brexit vote. Islay Robinson, of Enness Private Clients, a mortgage broker with offices in Mayfair and Hampstead, said 2017 “could be the year in which we call the bottom of the market”. There had been a slowdown in the market, he said, particularly at the top end, and activity was unlikely to pick up until confidence returned. “This is what happened in 2008: after a short period, experts recognised the bottom of the market and activity started to return as buyers who were holding off began to transact again. Agents are beginning to speak of glimmers of life in prime central London, so we hope that in 2017 people will realise that the market has no further to fall, and they will be driven to invest in London.” Robinson said elections in France and Germany in 2017 could have an impact on the London market. “We have seen large amounts of French investment in London in recent years and could see more in the event of [Marine] Le Pen’s – nicknamed ‘Madame Frexit’ – success.” One thing is certain about the UK housing market: it will go on being vexed by events in the EU next year. Two private islands, a six-bedroom bungalow and 12.5 acres with majestic views of sea and mountains, all for £300,000. With a home like that selling for less than a small flat in a grotty part of London, it’s not hard to see how Orkney became Britain’s hottest property market in 2016. House prices in Orkney rose by 20.6% in the year to September, according to Land Registry data, faster than anywhere else in the country. Its capital Kirkwall (population 9,000), 530 miles from London (population nearly 9 million) topped the price rise table, while the London Borough of Westminster flopped towards the bottom. At £143,839, the average property price on the islands is still well below the UK average of £217,888, never mind Westminster’s £961,686. But your money stretches a tad further. Around £200,000 buys a detached period home with beams and stone floors, while just £70,000 bags a rustic cottage close to an idyllic sandy beach. Andrew Bonner of estate agent Low attributes the mini-boom to a bounce in confidence since the independence referendum in 2014 – plus an influx of southerners seeking a life change. “Before the referendum, people were holding back, maybe nervous about the outcome. But once the result was clear, the market recovered. We also have a lot of people who have come from south of the border, looking for a change in lifestyle.” He adds that the ONS figures for Orkney should also be taken with a pinch of salt, as the number of transactions in any one year is low and the sale of just one or two high-price properties can distort the averages. Between 25 and 30 properties a month usually change hands across the 70 islands that make up Orkney, compared with more than 1,000 a month in large local authorities such as Birmingham. How robust the Orkney market is is another question. The downturn in North Sea oil– which has hit the city of Aberdeen hard – has had a spillover effect, and farmers and fishermen worry about what will happen to subsidies when Britain leaves the EU. Patrick Collinson


HONG KONG--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Q4 RICS (Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors) Hong Kong Commercial Property Monitor showed a slowdown in the decline in occupier and investor segments as hypothesised by built environment professionals. The sentiment surrounding retail remained downbeat with sustained weakness, while the office sector experienced a rebound in recent quarters. RICS’ two major headline indicators – the Occupier Sentiment Index (OSI) and the Investor Sentiment Index (ISI) – extrapolated this quarter with a +5 for both indicators. These indicators are constructed by taking the unweighted average of survey respondents’ analyses for three series relating to each market. Demand for office space remains at or near cyclical highs with a forecast for both capital values and rents revising sharply higher from Q3 to Q4. For the office occupier market, anecdotal reports state that mainland Chinese firms are paying above market values for prime office floor place. A 6.3% appreciation on capital values (vs 2.7% in Q3) and a 5.5% increase on prime office space rents (vs 3.2% in Q3) are expected in 2017. “The confidence in prime office space is largely a result of high demand from mainland financial and investment companies that are opening and expanding their offices in Hong Kong”, said Mr Frank Wong MRICS, RICS Hong Kong External Affairs and Public Concerns Committee Member, he added, “Hong Kong offers these companies a more corporate-friendly environment with a close proximity to mainland China.” “Various multinational and foreign financial companies are relocating their offices from Hong Kong Island to Kowloon East. As firms are displaced from prime locations, secondary office space receives a boost in capital value and rent forecast,” Mr Wong said. At a headline level, foreign enquiries remained flat in Q4 and were largely unchanged from Q3. Most contributors (47%) continued to see no change in credit conditions. This metric has been relatively unchanged for the past nine quarters. Interestingly, the US dollar’s appreciation has also increased the premium of Hong Kong dollar assets to foreigners. RICS Hong Kong Commercial Property Monitor is a quarterly sentiment index tracking trends in the commercial property market. It is a leading indicator for global investment and occupier markets. The full report is available at www.rics.org/economics. RICS promotes and enforces the highest professional qualifications and standards in the development and management of land, real estate, construction and infrastructure. Our name promises the consistent delivery of standards – bringing confidence to the markets we serve. We accredit 125,000 professionals and any individual or firm registered with RICS is subject to our quality assurance. Their expertise covers property, asset valuation, real estate management; the development of infrastructure; and the management of natural resources, such as mining, farms and woodland. From environmental assessments and building controls to negotiating land rights in an emerging economy; if our members are involved the same professional standards and ethics apply. We believe that standards underpin effective markets. With up to seventy per cent of the world’s wealth bound up in land and real estate, our sector is vital to economic development, helping to support stable, sustainable investment and growth around the globe. With offices covering the major political and financial centres of the world, our market presence means we are ideally placed to influence policy and embed professional standards. We work at a cross-governmental level, delivering international standards that will support a safe and vibrant marketplace in land, real estate, construction and infrastructure, for the benefit of all. We are proud of our reputation and work hard to protect it, so clients who work with an RICS professional can have confidence in the quality and ethics of the services they receive.


News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

HONG KONG--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Against a backdrop of tightening public purse strings and growing investment demand, construction industry leaders have joined together to set out a radical new approach to calculate costs for the world’s building and civil engineering projects, according to RICS (Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors). The International Construction Measurement Standards (ICMS) Coalition, a group of over 40 professional bodies established at the IMF in Washington D.C. in 2015, is


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

House hunters are returning to the market after the Brexit vote but are struggling to find suitable homes, which means prices are going up in all parts of the country apart from central London, according to surveyors The number of properties on the market dropped again in October, continuing the trend of the past two years, the latest monthly housing snapshot from the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (Rics) shows. Interest from would-be buyers rose for the second month in a row, with a balance of 10% of Rics members reporting more demand. The survey showed a small fall in new instructions in October. The combination of growing demand and falling supply pushed up house prices further, with 23% more surveyors reporting growth than a decline, up from a net balance of 18% in September. London remained an exception where prices fell for the eighth month, with 16% more surveyors reporting falling rather than rising prices. This reflected affordability issues and the slump in luxury home sales in inner London owing to Brexit uncertainty and stamp duty changes, while the outer boroughs were still seeing significant price growth, Rics said. Land Registry data has also suggested that the wealthiest buyers are shunning London, with sales of £10m-plus homes collapsing 86% in the past year. Simon Rubinsohn, the Rics chief economist, said: “The dire shortage of available housing across the UK is continuing to push prices upwards, regardless of the uncertainty linked to the ongoing discussions surrounding Brexit. We are only weeks away from the autumn statement and it will be interesting to see what measures – if any - the chancellor will put in place to increase housing supply and create a more affordable market.” As the market recovers after the shock vote to leave the EU in June, agreed sales rose slightly last month, with a balance of 5% of surveyors seeing an increase. All regions of the country are expected to experience a further rise in property transactions in coming months. Prices are also expected to keep rising, with 18% more surveyors predicting growth in the next three months rather than a decline. Central London is the only exception where prices are forecast to be broadly flat in the near future. The lack of homes to buy has fuelled demand in the lettings market, where a balance of 29% of surveyors reported a rise. London bucked this trend, with a balance of 15% reporting falling demand. This means rents are likely to fall in the next three months in the capital, in marked contrast with the rest of the country where rental growth expectations picked up, to 34% from 15% in the three months to June. The booming rental market could outstrip house buying for the first time since the 1930s next year, the UK’s biggest estate agency chain Countrywide has predicted.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

香港--(BUSINESS WIRE)--(美國商業資訊)--皇家特許測量師學會(「Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors」或簡稱「RICS」) 於今日在假香港賽馬會舉辦第二屆文物保育國際研討會,並由香港特別行政區政府環境局局長黃錦星, JP、皇家特許測量師學會香港區理事會主席劉健民先生、香港賽馬會行政總裁應家柏GBS, JP、皇家特許測量師學會高級副會長蒲敬思先生、籌備委員會主席何志榮教授、皇家特許測量師學會東亞區總裁陳顏文玲女士主持研討會開幕儀式。是次研討會匯集超過200名業界專家、企業領袖、營運者及政府代表共同探討文物建築保育的社會及經濟效益。 業界領導者探討活化及改做再利用上的計劃、政策、保護及營運文物建築案例包括前中區警署建築群 (大館)、廣東開平倉東村及Crown Wine Cellars,同時分享有關規劃政策的見解以推動未來發展計劃。參加者亦會就保留文物的規劃政策、改做再利用上的設計、經濟可行性及營運歷史文物這四個分組會議上作深入探討。 皇家特許測量師學會(RICS)香港區理事會主席劉健民先生表示﹕「在快速城市化及人口增長的時代

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